Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of abstract
Meaning of abstract by Wiktionary Dictionary

abstract


    Etymology 1

    First attested before 1456. From the adjective abstract .

    Pronunciation

    • ( an abstraction ): ( US ) enPR: ăb'străkt", IPA: /ˈæb.ˌstrækt/, X-SAMPA: /"{b%str{kt/[1]
    • ( US ) IPA: /ˌæb.ˈstrækt/

    Noun

    abstract ( plural: abstracts )

    1. An abridgement or summary.
    2. Something that concentrates in itself the qualities of larger item, or multiple items.
    3. An abstraction; an abstract term; that which is abstract.
    4. A summary title of the key points detailing a tract of land, for ownership; abstract of title .
    5. ( art ) An abstract work of art .
    6. ( medicine ) A powdered solid extract of a vegetable substance mixed with sugar of milk in such proportion that one part of the abstract represents two parts of the original substance .
    Synonyms
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    Pronunciation

    • ( US ) enPR: ăb'străkt", IPA: /æb.ˈstrækt/, /ˈæb.ˌstrækt/, X-SAMPA: /"{b%str{kt/

    Adjective

    abstract ( comparative more abstract and sometimes abstracter, superlative most abstract and sometimes abstractest )[1]

    1. ( archaic ) Absent-minded .
    2. Considered apart from any application to a particular object .
    3. Difficult to understand; abstruse .
    4. Insufficiently factual.[1]
    5. Not concrete; ideal .
    6. A number or a unit that does not relate to an actual thing;
    7. ( archaic ) Drawn away; removed from; apart from; separate.
    8. Apart from practice or reality; vague; theoretical; impersonal .
    9. ( art ) Free from representational qualities .
    10. ( music ) Absolute .
    11. ( dance ) Lacking a story .
    12. ( logic ) General ( as opposed to particular ).
    13. ( computing ) Of a class in object-oriented programming, being a partial basis for subclasses rather than a complete template for objects .
    Synonyms
    Antonyms
    Derived terms
    See also

    Etymology 3

    First attested in 1542. From the adjective form of abstract .

    Pronunciation

    • ( US ) enPR: ăb"străkt', IPA: /æb.ˈstrækt/, X-SAMPA: /%{b"str{kt/
    • ( to summarize ): ( US ) IPA: /ˈæb.ˌstrækt/

    Verb

    abstract ( third-person singular simple present abstracts present participle abstracting, simple past and past participle abstracted )

    1. ( transitive ) To separate; to remove; to take away; withdraw.
    2. ( transitive ) To consider abstractly; to contemplate separately or by itself .
    3. ( transitive ) To summarize; to abridge; to epitomize .
    4. ( transitive ) To draw off ( interest or attention ).
      He was wholly abstracted by other objects .
    5. ( transitive, euphemistic ) To steal; to take away; to remove without permission.
    6. ( transitive, art ) To create artistic abstractions of .
    7. ( transitive, obsolete ) To extract by means of distillation .
    8. ( intransitive, rare ) To perform the process of abstraction.
    9. ( intransitive, fine arts ) To create abstractions .
    10. ( intransitive ) To withdraw oneself; to retire .
    11. ( intransitive, computing ) To produce an abstraction, usually by refactoring existing code. Generally used with "out" .
      He abstracted out the square root function .
    Usage notes
    Synonyms
    Derived terms
    • abstractable
    • abstracted
    • abstracter
    • abstractor
    Related terms
    • abstraction
    • abstractive
    • abstractum

    See also

    • abstract in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
    1. ↑ 1.0 1.1 1.2 1976 [1909], Gove, Philip Babcock editor, Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language Unabridged, Springfield, MA: G. & C. Merriam Co., ISBN 0-87779-101-5, page 8:


Explanation of abstract by Wordnet Dictionary

abstract


    Verb
    1. consider a concept without thinking of a specific example

    2. consider apart from a particular case or instance

    3. Let's abstract away from this particular example
    4. give an abstract ( of )

    5. make off with belongings of others

    Adjective
    1. existing only in the mind

    2. abstract words like `truth' and `justice'
    3. dealing with a subject in the abstract without practical purpose or intention

    4. abstract reasoning
      abstract science
    5. not representing or imitating external reality or the objects of nature

    6. a large abstract painting
    Noun
    1. a concept or idea not associated with any specific instance

    2. he loved her only in the abstract--not in person
    3. a sketchy summary of the main points of an argument or theory