Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of address
Meaning of address by Wiktionary Dictionary

address


    Etymology

    Middle English adressen ( “to raise erect, adorn” ), from Old French adrecier ( “to straighten, address” ), ( French adresser ), from a ( Latin ad ) ( "to" ) + Old French drecier, ( French dresser ( “to straighten, arrange” ) ); see dress. Originally from the Latin ad ( “to” ) and directus ( “straight or right” ), signifying "right to the point"; from di- + perfect passive participle rectus, from verb rego ( “rule or direct” ) .

    Pronunciation

    • Noun:
      • ( RP ) enPR: ədrĕs', IPA: /ə.ˈdrɛs/, X-SAMPA: /@"drEs/
        • Rhymes: -ɛs
      • ( US, Canada ) enPR: ă'drĕs, IPA: /ˈæ.dɹɛs/, X-SAMPA: /"{drEs/
    • Verb:
      • ( UK, US ) enPR: ədrĕs', IPA: /ə.ˈdɹɛs/, X-SAMPA: /@"drEs/

    Noun

    address ( plural: addresses )

    1. Direction or superscription of a letter, or the name, title, and place of residence of the person addressed .
    2. Act of addressing oneself to a person; a discourse or speech.
    3. Manner of speaking to another; delivery .
      a man of pleasing or insinuating address
    4. Attention in the way one addresses a lady .
    5. Skill; skillful management; dexterity; adroitness .
    6. ( obsolete ) Act of preparing oneself .
    7. street location .
    8. ( computing ) A location in computer memory .
      The program will crash if there is no valid data stored at that address .
    9. ( Internet ) An Internet address; URL .

    Derived terms

    • subaddress, subaddressing

    Verb

    address ( third-person singular simple present addresses, present participle addressing, simple past and past participle addressed or ( obsolete ) addrest )

    1. ( intransitive, obsolete ) To prepare one's self.
    2. ( intransitive, obsolete ) To direct speech.
    3. ( transitive, obsolete ) To aim; to direct.
    4. ( transitive, obsolete ) To prepare or make ready.
    5. ( transitive, reflexive ) To prepare one's self; to apply one's skill or energies ( to some object ); to betake.
    6. ( transitive, archaic ) To clothe or array; to dress.
    7. ( transitive ) To direct, as words ( to any one or any thing ); to make, as a speech, petition, etc. ( to any one, an audience ) .
      He addressed some portions of his remarks to his supporters, some to his opponents .
    8. ( transitive ) To direct speech to; to make a communication to, whether spoken or written; to apply to by words, as by a speech, petition, etc., to speak to; to accost.
    9. ( transitive ) To direct in writing, as a letter; to superscribe, or to direct and transmit .
      He addressed a letter .
    10. ( transitive ) To make suit to as a lover; to court; to woo .
    11. ( transitive ) To consign or intrust to the care of another, as agent or factor .
      The ship was addressed to a merchant in Baltimore .
    12. ( transitive ) To address one's self to; to prepare one's self for; to apply one's self to; to direct one's speech or discourse to .
    13. ( transitive, formal ) To direct attention towards a problem or obstacle, in an attempt to resolve it.
    14. ( intransitive, computing ) To refer a location in computer memory .


Explanation of address by Wordnet Dictionary

address


    Verb
    1. adjust and aim ( a golf ball ) at in preparation of hitting

    2. speak to

    3. He addressed the crowd outside the window
    4. give a speech to

    5. The chairman addressed the board of trustees
    6. speak to someone

    7. put an address on ( an envelope )

    8. act on verbally or in some form of artistic expression

    9. direct a question at someone

    10. address or apply oneself to something, direct one's efforts towards something, such as a question

    11. access or locate by address

    12. greet, as with a prescribed form, title, or name

    13. He always addresses me with `Sir'
    Noun
    1. social skill

    2. the stance assumed by a golfer in preparation for hitting a golf ball

    3. the code that identifies where a piece of information is stored

    4. written directions for finding some location

    5. a sign in front of a house or business carrying the conventional form by which its location is described

    6. the manner of speaking to another individual

    7. he failed in his manner of address to the captain
    8. the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience

    9. he listened to an address on minor Roman poets
    10. the place where a person or organization can be found or communicated with



    Definition of address by GCIDE Dictionary

    address


    1. Address ( ăddrĕs ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Addressed ( -drĕst ); p. pr. & vb. n. Addressing.] [OE. adressen to raise erect, adorn, OF. adrecier, to straighten, address, F. adresser, fr. à ( L. ad ) + OF. drecier, F. dresser, to straighten, arrange. See Dress, v.]
      1. To aim; to direct. [Obs.] Chaucer.

      And this good knight his way with me addrest. Spenser.

      2. To prepare or make ready. [Obs.]

      His foe was soon addressed. Spenser.

      Turnus addressed his men to single fight. Dryden.

      The five foolish virgins addressed themselves at the noise of the bridegroom's coming. Jer. Taylor.

      3. Reflexively: To prepare one's self; to apply one's skill or energies ( to some object ); to betake.

      These men addressed themselves to the task. Macaulay.

      4. To clothe or array; to dress. [Archaic]

      Tecla . . . addressed herself in man's apparel. Jewel.

      5. To direct, as words ( to any one or any thing ); to make, as a speech, petition, etc. ( to any one, an audience ).

      The young hero had addressed his players to him for his assistance. Dryden.

      6. To direct speech to; to make a communication to, whether spoken or written; to apply to by words, as by a speech, petition, etc., to speak to; to accost.

      Are not your orders to address the senate? Addison.

      The representatives of the nation addressed the king. Swift.

      7. To direct in writing, as a letter; to superscribe, or to direct and transmit; as, “he addressed a letter”.

      8. To make suit to as a lover; to court; to woo.

      9. ( Com. ) To consign or intrust to the care of another, as agent or factor; as, “the ship was addressed to a merchant in Baltimore”.

      To address one's self to. To prepare one's self for; to apply one's self to. To direct one's speech or discourse to. -- To address the ball ( Golf ), to take aim at the ball, adjusting the grip on the club, the attitude of the body, etc., to a convenient position.

    2. Address ( ăddrĕs ), v. i.
      1. To prepare one's self. [Obs.] “Let us address to tend on Hector's heels.” Shak.

      2. To direct speech. [Obs.]

      Young Turnus to the beauteous maid addrest. Dryden.

      ☞ The intransitive uses come from the dropping out of the reflexive pronoun.

    3. Address, n. [Cf. F. adresse. See Address, v. t.]

      1. Act of preparing one's self. [Obs.] Jer Taylor.

      2. Act of addressing one's self to a person; verbal application.

      3. A formal communication, either written or spoken; a discourse; a speech; a formal application to any one; a petition; a formal statement on some subject or special occasion; as, “an address of thanks, an address to the voters”.

      4. Direction or superscription of a letter, or the name, title, and place of residence of the person addressed.

      5. Manner of speaking to another; delivery; as, “a man of pleasing or insinuating address”.

      6. Attention in the way one's addresses to a lady. Addison.

      7. Skill; skillful management; dexterity; adroitness.

      Syn. -- Speech; discourse; harangue; oration; petition; lecture; readiness; ingenuity; tact; adroitness.