Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of AN
Meaning of an by Wiktionary Dictionary

AN


    Etymology

    Derived from the first letters of Army and Navy .

    Noun

    AN ( uncountable )

    1. A set of sizes for screw threads agreed upon and jointly used by the United States Army and Navy .

    Anagrams

    • N.A., NA, n.a., n/a, na

    -an

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/07/15 08:35 UTC Version )

    Alternative forms

    • -ian

    Etymology

    From Latin -ānus, which forms adjectives of belonging or origin from a noun .

    Suffix

    -an

    1. of or pertaining to; adjective suffix appended to various words, often nouns, to make an adjective form. Often added to words of Latin origin, but used with other words also .
      Rome, Roman
      Minnesota, Minnesotan
    2. Appended to nouns to form an agent noun .
      comedian, from comedy +‎ -an
      historian, from history +‎ -an

    Synonyms

    ( adjective-forming suffix ): -al, -ar, -ese, -ic, -id, -ish, -like, -oid, -ous, -y

    Etymology

    From Proto-Germanic *-anan

    Suffix

    -an

    1. ( verbal suffix ) used to form the infinitive of most verbs ( exceptions are verbs like flēon "to flee" )
      singan "to sing"
      niman "to take"

    n )">a( n )

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/03/29 10:46 UTC Version )

    Article

    a( n )

    1. a or an; the indefinite article ( when the initial sound of what will follow is unclear )
      • 2003, Wade E. Gaddy, Robert E. Hart, Judy Wolk, Real Estate Fundamentals ( page 62 )
        To be valid, a deed must contain a( n )
        a. grantee's signature.
        b. grantor's signature.
        c. acknowledgment.
        d. date .

    an'

    By Wiktionary ( 2011/07/05 15:46 UTC Version )

    短縮形

    an'

    1. and
      She'll be ridin' an' comin' up soon. The smart girl an' the silly boy .

    Anagrams

    • N.A., NA, n.a., n/a, na

    an-

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/07/27 04:49 UTC Version )

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English an-, from Old English an-, on- ( “on-” ), from Proto-Germanic *ana ( “on” ). More at on .

    Alternative form

    • on-, a-

    Preposition

    an-

    1. A prefix of Anglo-Saxon origin, the same as on- .
      ancome, aneal, anent

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English an-, and-, from Old English and-, ond- ( “and-, back, against” ). More at and- .

    Preposition

    an-

    1. A prefix of Anglo-Saxon origin, a reduced form of and- .
      answer

    Etymology 3

    From Ancient Greek ἀν- .

    Preposition

    an-

    1. not; used to make words that have a sense opposite to the word ( or stem ) to which the prefix is attached. Used with stems that begin with vowels and "h" .
    Related terms
    • a-
    Derived terms
    • anarchy
    • anechoic
    • anharmonic

    See also

    Alternative forms

    • ǣn-

    Etymology

    From ān "one". More at ān

    Preposition

    ān-

    1. one, uni-, only
      āncyn "only, unique"
    2. sole, single, solitary
      ānbūend "hermit"
      ānġilde "single payment"


Explanation of an by Wordnet Dictionary

AN


    Noun
    1. an associate degree in nursing



    Definition of an by GCIDE Dictionary

    AN


    1. An ( ăn ). [AS. ān one, the same word as the numeral. See One, and cf. A.] This word is properly an adjective, but is commonly called the indefinite article. It is used before nouns of the singular number only, and signifies one, or any, but somewhat less emphatically. In such expressions as “twice an hour,” “once an age,” a shilling an ounce ( see 2d A, 2 ), it has a distributive force, and is equivalent to each, every.

      ☞ An is used before a word beginning with a vowel sound; as, an enemy, an hour. It in also often used before h sounded, when the accent of the word falls on the second syllable; as, an historian, an hyena, an heroic deed. Many writers use a before h in such positions. Anciently an was used before consonants as well as vowels.

    2. An, conj. [Shortened fr. and, OE. an., and, sometimes and if, in introducing conditional clauses, like Icel. enda if, the same word as and. Prob. and was originally pleonastic before the conditional clause.] If; -- a word used by old English authors. Shak.

      Nay, an thou dalliest, then I am thy foe. B. Jonson.

      An if, and if; if.