Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of AND
Meaning of and by Wiktionary Dictionary

AND


    Noun

    AND ( plural: ANDs )

    1. ( logic ) Alternative form of ∧, the conjunction operator .

    Verb

    to AND ( third-person singular simple present ANDs present participle ANDing, simple past and past participle ANDed )

    1. ( logic, transitive ) To combine ( a value ) with another value by means of this operator.

    See also

    Anagrams

    • ADN
    • dan, Dan, Dan., DAN
    • DNA
    • nad, NAD
    • NDA

    -and

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/04/30 19:48 UTC Version )

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English -and, -end, -ant, -nd, from Old English -ende, -ande, present participle ending of verbs, and Old English -end, -nd, agent ending, both from Proto-Germanic *-andz ( 現在分詞 suffix ), from Proto-Indo-European *-anto-. More at -ing .

    Alternative form

    • -ant, -nd, -on

    Suffix

    -and

    1. ( Now chiefly dialectal, Scotland ) Used to form the present participle of verbs, equivalent to -ing .
      livand, nurischand, ravand, snipand
    2. ( rare or no longer productive ) A suffix of Anglo-Saxon origin forming adjectives from verbs analogous to -ing .
      waniand, blatant, flippant, gainand, warkand
    3. ( no longer productive ) A noun suffix, usually denoting agency, similar to -er .
      errand, thousand, weasand
      friend, fiend, bond, husband, healand

    Etymology 2

    From Latin gerundive termination -andus, -endus. More at -end .

    Alternative form

    • -end

    Suffix

    -and

    1. A suffix forming nouns denoting patients or recipients of actions, such as compiland .
    Derived terms
    [+] English words suffixed with -and
    Synonyms
    Antonyms

    and-

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/04/12 20:49 UTC Version )

    Alternative forms

    • an-, on-

    Etymology

    From Middle English and-, ond-, from Old English and-, ond- ( “against, back” ), from Proto-Germanic *and-, *anda-, *andi- ( “across, opposite, against, away” ), from Proto-Indo-European *anta, *anti ( “across, forth” ), from Proto-Indo-European *ant- ( “forehead, foreside, end, limit” ). Cognate with Dutch ont-, German ant-, ent-, emp-, Icelandic and-, Gothic ( and- ), ( anda- ), Latin ante ( “before” ), Ancient Greek ἀντί ( anti, “against” ) .

    Preposition

    and-

    1. ( no longer productive ) A prefix of Old English origin meaning "against", "back", "in return", "away", represented in Modern English by a-, an-, on-, and in altered form by the reverse-action prefix un- ( i.e. unbuckle ). Also as the initial letter d in dread ( < Old English ondrǣdan ) .
      along
      answer
      onfang
      onset

    See also

    • and- in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

    Etymology

    Proto-Germanic *andi-, representive of a combining form of and ( “かつ” ). Cognate with Middle Dutch ont- ( Dutch ont- ), Old High German ant- ( German ant-, ent- ), Old Norse and- ( Icelandic and- ( “against, anti-, opposed to, in the face of” ), Swedish an- ), Gothic ������- .

    Pronunciation

    Preposition

    and-

    1. forming compounds words with the sense "against, opposing"; opposition
      andsaca ( “opponent, adversary” )
    2. in return, back
      andswaru "answer, reply"
    3. facing, toward; completely, fully
      andweard "present time"
      andlang "entire, continuous"
      andweorc ( “substance, matter, cause” ); andleofen, andleofa ( “nourishment, sustenance” )
    4. without



Definition of and by GCIDE Dictionary

AND


  1. And conj. [AS. and; akin to OS. endi, Icel. enda, OHG. anti, enti, inti, unti, G. und, D. en, OD. ende. Cf, An if, Ante-.]
    1. A particle which expresses the relation of connection or addition. It is used to conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.

    It is sometimes used emphatically; as, “there are women and women,” that is, two very different sorts of women.

    By a rhetorical figure, notions, one of which is modificatory of the other, are connected by and; as, “the tediousness and process of my travel,” that is, the tedious process, etc.; “thy fair and outward character,” that is, thy outwardly fair character, Schmidt's Shak. Lex.

    2. In order to; -- used instead of the infinitival to, especially after try, come, go.

    At least to try and teach the erring soul. Milton.

    3. It is sometimes, in old songs, a mere expletive.

    When that I was and a little tiny boy. Shak.

    4. If; though. See An, conj. [Obs.] Chaucer.

    As they will set an house on fire, and it were but to roast their eggs. Bacon.

    And so forth, and others; and the rest; and similar things; and other things or ingredients. The abbreviation, etc. ( et cetera ), or &c., is usually read and so forth.