Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of broke
Meaning of broke by Wiktionary Dictionary

broke


    Pronunciation

    • ( RP ) enPR: brōk, IPA: /brəʊk/, SAMPA: /br@Uk/
    • ( GenAm ) enPR: brōk, IPA: /broʊk/, SAMPA: /broUk/
    • Rhymes: -əʊk

    Adjective

    broke ( comparative more broke, superlative most broke )

    1. ( informal ) Lacking money; bankrupt
    2. ( informal ) Broken .

    Synonyms

    Verb

    broke

    1. Simple past of break .
    2. ( archaic or poetic ) Past participle of break
      1. ( nautical ) Demoted, deprived an of a commission .
        He was broke and rendered unfit to serve His Majesty at sea .

    Statistics



Explanation of broke by Wordnet Dictionary

broke


    Adjective
    1. lacking funds



    Definition of broke by GCIDE Dictionary

    broke


    1. Break ( brāk ), v. t. [imp. broke ( brōk ), ( Obs. Brake ); p. p. Broken ( brōk'n ), ( Obs. Broke ); p. pr. & vb. n. Breaking.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka, bräkka to crack, Dan. brække to break, Goth. brikan to break, L. frangere. Cf. Bray to pound, Breach, Fragile.]
      1. To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, “to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock”. Shak.

      2. To lay open as by breaking; to divide; as, “to break a package of goods”.

      3. To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.

      Katharine, break thy mind to me. Shak.

      4. To infringe or violate, as an obligation, law, or promise.

      Out, out, hyena! these are thy wonted arts . . .

      To break all faith, all vows, deceive, betray. Milton

      5. To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, “to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey”.

      Go, release them, Ariel;

      My charms I'll break, their senses I'll restore. Shak.

      6. To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, “to break a set”.

      7. To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce; as, “the cavalry were not able to break the British squares”.

      8. To shatter to pieces; to reduce to fragments.

      The victim broke in pieces the musical instruments with which he had solaced the hours of captivity. Prescott.

      9. To exchange for other money or currency of smaller denomination; as, “to break a five dollar bill”.

      10. To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of; as, “to break flax”.

      11. To weaken or impair, as health, spirit, or mind.

      An old man, broken with the storms of state. Shak.

      12. To diminish the force of; to lessen the shock of, as a fall or blow.

      I'll rather leap down first, and break your fall. Dryden.

      13. To impart, as news or information; to broach; -- with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, “to break the news gently to the widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend”.

      14. To tame; to reduce to subjection; to make tractable; to discipline; as, “to break a horse to the harness or saddle”. “To break a colt.” Spenser.

      Why, then thou canst not break her to the lute? Shak.

      15. To destroy the financial credit of; to make bankrupt; to ruin.

      With arts like these rich Matho, when he speaks,

      Attracts all fees, and little lawyers breaks. Dryden.

      16. To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss.

      I see a great officer broken. Swift.

      With prepositions or adverbs: --

      To break down. To crush; to overwhelm; as, “to break down one's strength; to break down opposition”. To remove, or open a way through, by breaking; as, “to break down a door or wall”. -- To break in. To force in; as, “to break in a door”. To train; to discipline; as, “a horse well broken in”. -- To break of, to rid of; to cause to abandon; as, “to break one of a habit”. -- To break off. To separate by breaking; as, “to break off a twig”. To stop suddenly; to abandon. “Break off thy sins by righteousness.” Dan. iv. 27. -- To break open, to open by breaking. “Open the door, or I will break it open.” Shak. -- To break out, to take or force out by breaking; as, “to break out a pane of glass”. -- To break out a cargo, to unstow a cargo, so as to unload it easily. -- To break through. To make an opening through, as, as by violence or the force of gravity; to pass violently through; as, “to break through the enemy's lines; to break through the ice”.. To disregard; as, “to break
      through the ceremony”. -- To break up. To separate into parts; to plow ( new or fallow ground ). “Break up this capon.” Shak. “Break up your fallow ground.” Jer. iv. 3. To dissolve; to put an end to. “Break up the court.” Shak. -- To break ( one ) all up, to unsettle or disconcert completely; to upset. [Colloq.]

      With an immediate object: --

      To break the back. To dislocate the backbone; hence, to disable totally. To get through the worst part of; as, “to break the back of a difficult undertaking”. -- To break bulk, to destroy the entirety of a load by removing a portion of it; to begin to unload; also, to transfer in detail, as from boats to cars. -- To break a code to discover a method to convert coded messages into the original understandable text. -- To break cover, to burst forth from a protecting concealment, as game when hunted. -- To break a deer or To break a stag, to cut it up and apportion the parts among those entiBreak ( brāk ), v. t. [imp. broke ( brōk ), ( Obs. Brake ); p. p. Broken ( brōk'n ), ( Obs. Broke ); p. pr. & vb. n. Breaking.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka, bräkka to crack, Dan. brække to break, Goth. brikan to break, L. frangere. Cf. Bray to pound, Breach, Fragile.]
      1. To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, “to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock”. Shak.

      2. To lay open as by breaking; to divide; as, “to break a package of goods”.

      3. To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.

      Katharine, break thy mind to me. Shak.

      4. To infringe or violate, as an obligation, law, or promise.

      Out, out, hyena! these are thy wonted arts . . .

      To break all faith, all vows, deceive, betray. Milton

      5. To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, “to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey”.

      Go, release them, Ariel;

      My charms I'll break, their senses I'll restore. Shak.

      6. To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, “to break a set”.

      [
    2. Break ( brāk ), v. t. [imp. broke ( brōk ), ( Obs. Brake ); p. p. Broken ( brōk'n ), ( Obs. Broke ); p. pr. & vb. n. Breaking.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka, bräkka to crack, Dan. brække to break, Goth. brikan to break, L. frangere. Cf. Bray to pound, Breach, Fragile.]
      1. To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, “to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock”. Shak.

      2. To lay open as by breaking; to divide; as, “to break a package of goods”.

      3. To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.

      Katharine, break thy mind to me. Shak.

      4. To infringe or violate, as an obligation, law, or promise.

      Out, out, hyena! these are thy wonted arts . . .

      To break all faith, all vows, deceive, betray. Milton

      5. To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, “to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey”.

      Go, release them, Ariel;

      My charms I'll break, their senses I'll restore. Shak.

      6. To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, “to break a set”.

      7. To destroy the arrangement of; to throw into disorder; to pierce; as, “the cavalry were not able to break the British squares”.

      8. To shatter to pieces; to reduce to fragments.

      The victim broke in pieces the musical instruments with which he had solaced the hours of captivity. Prescott.

      9. To exchange for other money or currency of smaller denomination; as, “to break a five dollar bill”.

      10. To destroy the strength, firmness, or consistency of; as, “to break flax”.

      11. To weaken or impair, as health, spirit, or mind.

      An old man, broken with the storms of state. Shak.

      12. To diminish the force of; to lessen the shock of, as a fall or blow.

      I'll rather leap down first, and break your fall. Dryden.

      13. To impart, as news or information; to broach; -- with to, and often with a modified word implying some reserve; as, “to break the news gently to the widow; to break a purpose cautiously to a friend”.

      14. To tame; to reduce to subjection; to make tractable; to discipline; as, “to break a horse to the harness or saddle”. “To break a colt.” Spenser.

      Why, then thou canst not break her to the lute? Shak.

      15. To destroy the financial credit of; to make bankrupt; to ruin.

      With arts like these rich Matho, when he speaks,

      Attracts all fees, and little lawyers breaks. Dryden.

      16. To destroy the official character and standing of; to cashier; to dismiss.

      I see a great officer broken. Swift.

      With prepositions or adverbs: --

      To break down. To crush; to overwhelm; as, “to break down one's strength; to break down opposition”. To remove, or open a way through, by breaking; as, “to break down a door or wall”. -- To break in. To force in; as, “to break in a door”. To train; to discipline; as, “a horse well broken in”. -- To break of, to rid of; to cause to abandon; as, “to break one of a habit”. -- To break off. To separate by breaking; as, “to break off a twig”. To stop suddenly; to abandon. “Break off thy sins by righteousness.” Dan. iv. 27. -- To break open, to open by breaking. “Open the door, or I will break it open.” Shak. -- To break out, to take or force out by breaking; as, “to break out a pane of glass”. -- To break out a cargo, to unstow a cargo, so as to unload it easily. -- To break through. To make an opening through, as, as by violence or the force of gravity; to pass violently through; as, “to break through the enemy's lines; to break through the ice”.. To disregard; as, “to break
      through the ceremony”. -- To break up. To separate into parts; to plow ( new or fallow ground ). “Break up this capon.” Shak. “Break up your fallow ground.” Jer. iv. 3. To dissolve; to put an end to. “Break up the court.” Shak. -- To break ( one ) all up, to unsettle or disconcert completely; to upset. [Colloq.]

      With an immediate object: --

      To break the back. To dislocate the backbone; hence, to disable totally. To get through the worst part of; as, “to break the back of a difficult undertaking”. -- To break bulk, to destroy the entirety of a load by removing a portion of it; to begin to unload; also, to transfer in detail, as from boats to cars. -- To break a code to discover a method to convert coded messages into the original understandable text. -- To break cover, to burst forth from a protecting concealment, as game when hunted. -- To break a deer or To break a stag, to cut it up and apportion the parts among those entiBreak ( brāk ), v. t. [imp. broke ( brōk ), ( Obs. Brake ); p. p. Broken ( brōk'n ), ( Obs. Broke ); p. pr. & vb. n. Breaking.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka, bräkka to crack, Dan. brække to break, Goth. brikan to break, L. frangere. Cf. Bray to pound, Breach, Fragile.]
      1. To strain apart; to sever by fracture; to divide with violence; as, “to break a rope or chain; to break a seal; to break an axle; to break rocks or coal; to break a lock”. Shak.

      2. To lay open as by breaking; to divide; as, “to break a package of goods”.

      3. To lay open, as a purpose; to disclose, divulge, or communicate.

      Katharine, break thy mind to me. Shak.

      4. To infringe or violate, as an obligation, law, or promise.

      Out, out, hyena! these are thy wonted arts . . .

      To break all faith, all vows, deceive, betray. Milton

      5. To interrupt; to destroy the continuity of; to dissolve or terminate; as, “to break silence; to break one's sleep; to break one's journey”.

      Go, release them, Ariel;

      My charms I'll break, their senses I'll restore. Shak.

      6. To destroy the completeness of; to remove a part from; as, “to break a set”.

      [
    3. Broke ( ), v. i. [See Broker, and cf. Brook.]
      1. To transact business for another. [R.] Brome.

      2. To act as procurer in love matters; to pimp. [Obs.]

      We do want a certain necessary woman to broke between them, Cupid said. Fanshawe.

      And brokes with all that can in such a suit

      Corrupt the tender honor of a maid. Shak.


    4. Broke ( brōk ), imp. & p. p. of Break.