Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of Case
Meaning of case by Wiktionary Dictionary

Case


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /keɪs/, SAMPA: /keIs/
    • Rhymes: -eɪs

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English cas < Old English cas, casus ( “noun case” ) < Old French cas ( “an event” ) < Latin casus ( “a falling, a fall; accident, event, occurrence; occasion, opportunity; noun case” ), perfect passive participle of cado ( “to fall, to drop” ) < Proto-Indo-European *kad- ( “to fall” ) .

    Noun

    case ( plural: cases )

    1. An actual event, situation, or fact .
      For a change, in this case, he was telling the truth .
      It is not the case that every unfamiliar phrase is an idiom .
      In case of fire, break glass. [sign on fire extinguisher holder in public space]
    2. A piece of work, specifically defined within a profession .
      It was one of the detective's easiest cases .
      Social workers should work on a maximum of forty active cases .
      The doctor told us of an interesting case he had treated that morning .
    3. ( law ) A legal proceeding, lawsuit .
    4. ( grammar ) A specific inflection of a word depending on its function in the sentence .
      The accusative case canonically indicates a direct object .
      Latin has six cases, and remnants of a seventh .
    5. ( grammar, uncountable ) Grammatical cases and their meanings taken either as a topic in general or within a specific language .
      Jane has been studying case in Caucasian languages .
      Latin is a language that employs case .
    6. ( medicine ) An instance of a specific condition or set of symptoms .
      There were another five cases reported overnight .
    Derived terms
    Hyponyms

    See also

    • Appendix:Grammatical cases

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English cas < Old Northern French casse, Old French chasse ( “box, chest, case” ) < Latin capsa ( “box, bookcase” ), from capio ( “to take, seize, hold” ) .

    Noun

    case ( plural: cases )

    1. A box that contains or can contain a number of identical items of manufacture .
    2. A piece of luggage that can be used to transport an apparatus such as a sewing machine .
    3. A suitcase .
    4. A piece of furniture, constructed partially of transparent glass or plastic, within which items can be displayed .
    5. The outer covering or framework of a piece of apparatus such as a computer .
    6. ( typography ) The nature of a piece of alphabetic type, whether a “capital” ( upper case ) or “small” ( lower case ) letter .
    7. ( poker slang ) Four of a kind .
    8. ( US ) A unit of liquid measure used to measure sales in the beverage industry equivalent to 192 fluid ounces .
    Derived terms
    References
    • Weisenberg, Michael ( 2000 ) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. ISBN 978-1880069523

    Adjective

    case ( not comparable )

    1. ( poker slang ) The last remaining card of a particular rank
      He drew the case eight!
    References
    • Weisenberg, Michael ( 2000 ) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. ISBN 978-1880069523

    Verb

    to case ( third-person singular simple present cases present participle casing, simple past and past participle cased )

    1. ( transitive ) To place ( an item or items of manufacture ) into a box, as in preparation for shipment .
    2. ( transitive, informal ) To survey ( a building or other location ) surreptitiously, as in preparation for a robbery.

    Statistics

    frequency based on Project Gutenberg corpus">Most common English words: hear « least « person « #312: case » fact » known » thee

    Anagrams

    • Aces, aces, æsc, ASCE, ESCA


Explanation of case by Wordnet Dictionary

Case


    Verb
    1. enclose in, or as if in, a case

    2. my feet were encased in mud
    3. look over, usually with the intention to rob

    4. They men cased the housed
    Noun
    1. a comprehensive term for any proceeding in a court of law whereby an individual seeks a legal remedy

    2. a portable container for carrying several objects

    3. the musicians left their instrument cases backstage
    4. a glass container used to store and display items in a shop or museum or home

    5. bed linen consisting of a cover for a pillow

    6. the burglar carried his loot in a pillowcase
    7. the receptacle in which a compositor has his type, which is divided into compartments for the different letters, spaces, or numbers

    8. for English, a compositor will ordinarily have two such cases, the upper case containing the capitals and the lower case containing the small letters
    9. the enclosing frame around a door or window opening

    10. the casings had rotted away and had to be replaced
    11. the housing or outer covering of something

    12. the clock has a walnut case
    13. an enveloping structure or covering enclosing an animal or plant organ or part

    14. the actual state of things

    15. that was not the case
    16. nouns or pronouns or adjectives ( often marked by inflection ) related in some way to other words in a sentence

    17. a statement of facts and reasons used to support an argument

    18. he stated his case clearly
    19. a problem requiring investigation

    20. Perry Mason solved the case of the missing heir
    21. a specific size and style of type within a type family

    22. an occurrence of something

    23. it was a case of bad judgment
    24. a person requiring professional services

    25. a typical case was the suburban housewife described by a marriage counselor
    26. a person of a specified kind ( usually with many eccentricities )

    27. a mental case
    28. a person who is subjected to experimental or other observational procedures

    29. the cases that we studied were drawn from two different communities
    30. the quantity contained in a case

    31. a special set of circumstances

    32. it may rain in which case the picnic will be canceled
    33. a specific state of mind that is temporary

    34. a case of the jitters


    Definition of case by GCIDE Dictionary

    Case


    1. Case ( kās ), n. [OF. casse, F. caisse ( cf. It. cassa ), fr. L. capsa chest, box, case, fr. capere to take, hold. See Capacious, and cf. 4th Chase, Cash, Enchase, 3d Sash.]

      1. A box, sheath, or covering; as, “a case for holding goods; a case for spectacles; the case of a watch; the case ( capsule ) of a cartridge; a case ( cover ) for a book”.

      2. A box and its contents; the quantity contained in a box; as, “a case of goods; a case of instruments”.

      3. ( Print. ) A shallow tray divided into compartments or “boxes” for holding type.

      ☞ Cases for type are usually arranged in sets of two, called respectively the upper and the lower case. The upper case contains capitals, small capitals, accented and marked letters, fractions, and marks of reference: the lower case contains the small letters, figures, marks of punctuation, quadrats, and spaces.

      4. An inclosing frame; a casing; as, “a door case; a window case”.

      5. ( Mining ) A small fissure which admits water to the workings. Knight.

    2. Case, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Cased ; p. pr. & vb. n. Casing.]
      1. To cover or protect with, or as with, a case; to inclose.

      The man who, cased in steel, had passed whole days and nights in the saddle. Prescott.

      2. To strip the skin from; as, “to case a box”. [Obs.]

    3. Case, n. [F. cas, fr. L. casus, fr. cadere to fall, to happen. Cf. Chance.]
      1. Chance; accident; hap; opportunity. [Obs.]

      By aventure, or sort, or cas. Chaucer.

      2. That which befalls, comes, or happens; an event; an instance; a circumstance, or all the circumstances; condition; state of things; affair; as, “a strange case; a case of injustice; the case of the Indian tribes”.

      In any case thou shalt deliver him the pledge. Deut. xxiv. 13.

      If the case of the man be so with his wife. Matt. xix. 10.

      And when a lady's in the case

      You know all other things give place. Gay.

      You think this madness but a common case. Pope.

      I am in case to justle a constable, Shak.

      3. ( Med. & Surg. ) A patient under treatment; an instance of sickness or injury; as, “ten cases of fever”; also, the history of a disease or injury.

      A proper remedy in hypochondriacal cases. Arbuthnot.

      4. ( Law ) The matters of fact or conditions involved in a suit, as distinguished from the questions of law; a suit or action at law; a cause.

      Let us consider the reason of the case, for nothing is law that is not reason. Sir John Powell.

      Not one case in the reports of our courts. Steele.

      5. ( Gram. ) One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word.

      Case is properly a falling off from the nominative or first state of word; the name for which, however, is now, by extension of its signification, applied also to the nominative. J. W. Gibbs.

      ☞ Cases other than the nominative are oblique cases. Case endings are terminations by which certain cases are distinguished. In old English, as in Latin, nouns had several cases distinguished by case endings, but in modern English only that of the possessive case is retained.

      Action on the case ( Law ), according to the old classification ( now obsolete ), was an action for redress of wrongs or injuries to person or property not specially provided against by law, in which the whole cause of complaint was set out in the writ; -- called also trespass on the case, or simply case. -- All a case, a matter of indifference. [Obs.] “It is all a case to me.” L'Estrange. -- Case at bar. See under Bar, n. -- Case divinity, casuistry. -- Case lawyer, one versed in the reports of cases rather than in the science of the law. -- Case stated or Case agreed on ( Law ), a statement in writing of facts agreed on and submitted to the court for a decision of the legal points arising on them. -- A hard case, an abandoned or incorrigible person. [Colloq.] -- In any case, whatever may be the state of affairs; anyhow. -- In case, or In case that, if; supposing that; in the event or contingency; if it should happen that. “In case we are surprised, keep by me.” W. Irving. -- In good case, in good condition,
      health, or state of body. -- To put a case, to suppose a hypothetical or illustrative case.

      Syn. -- Situation, condition, state; circumstances; plight; predicament; occurrence; contingency; accident; event; conjuncture; cause; action; suit.

    4. Case, n. [F. cas, fr. L. casus, fr. cadere to fall, to happen. Cf. Chance.]
      1. Chance; accident; hap; opportunity. [Obs.]

      By aventure, or sort, or cas. Chaucer.

      2. That which befalls, comes, or happens; an event; an instance; a circumstance, or all the circumstances; condition; state of things; affair; as, “a strange case; a case of injustice; the case of the Indian tribes”.

      In any case thou shalt deliver him the pledge. Deut. xxiv. 13.

      If the case of the man be so with his wife. Matt. xix. 10.

      And when a lady's in the case

      You know all other things give place. Gay.

      You think this madness but a common case. Pope.

      I am in case to justle a constable, Shak.

      3. ( Med. & Surg. ) A patient under treatment; an instance of sickness or injury; as, “ten cases of fever”; also, the history of a disease or injury.

      A proper remedy in hypochondriacal cases. Arbuthnot.

      4. ( Law ) The matters of fact or conditions involved in a suit, as distinguished from the questions of law; a suit or action at law; a cause.

      Let us consider the reason of the case, for nothing is law that is not reason. Sir John Powell.

      Not one case in the reports of our courts. Steele.

      5. ( Gram. ) One of the forms, or the inflections or changes of form, of a noun, pronoun, or adjective, which indicate its relation to other words, and in the aggregate constitute its declension; the relation which a noun or pronoun sustains to some other word.

      Case is properly a falling off from the nominative or first state of word; the name for which, however, is now, by extension of its signification, applied also to the nominative. J. W. Gibbs.

      ☞ Cases other than the nominative are oblique cases. Case endings are terminations by which certain cases are distinguished. In old English, as in Latin, nouns had several cases distinguished by case endings, but in modern English only that of the possessive case is retained.

      Action on the case ( Law ), according to the old classification ( now obsolete ), was an action for redress of wrongs or injuries to person or property not specially provided against by law, in which the whole cause of complaint was set out in the writ; -- called also trespass on the case, or simply case. -- All a case, a matter of indifference. [Obs.] “It is all a case to me.” L'Estrange. -- Case at bar. See under Bar, n. -- Case divinity, casuistry. -- Case lawyer, one versed in the reports of cases rather than in the science of the law. -- Case stated or Case agreed on ( Law ), a statement in writing of facts agreed on and submitted to the court for a decision of the legal points arising on them. -- A hard case, an abandoned or incorrigible person. [Colloq.] -- In any case, whatever may be the state of affairs; anyhow. -- In case, or In case that, if; supposing that; in the event or contingency; if it should happen that. “In case we are surprised, keep by me.” W. Irving. -- In good case, in good condition,
      health, or state of body. -- To put a case, to suppose a hypothetical or illustrative case.

      Syn. -- Situation, condition, state; circumstances; plight; predicament; occurrence; contingency; accident; event; conjuncture; cause; action; suit.

    5. Case, v. i. To propose hypothetical cases. [Obs.] “Casing upon the matter.” L'Estrange.