Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of coming
Meaning of coming by Wiktionary Dictionary

coming


    Etymology 1

    come +‎ -ing

    Verb

    coming

    1. Present participle of come .

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English present participle of comen

    Noun

    coming ( plural: comings )

    1. The act of arriving; an arrival
    Derived terms

    Adjective

    coming ( not comparable )

    1. Next .
      We expect great things from you this coming year .
    2. Deserved .
      When he was fired, nobody was surprised or upset because they thought he had it coming .
    3. Newly in fashion; advancing into maturity or achievement .
      Ergonomic wallets are the coming thing .

    Derived terms

    Anagrams



Explanation of coming by Wordnet Dictionary

coming


    Adjective
    1. of the relatively near future

    2. this coming Thursday
      the forthcoming holidays
      the upcoming spring fashions
    Noun
    1. arrival that has been awaited ( especially of something momentous )

    2. the moment of most intense pleasure in sexual intercourse

    3. the act of drawing spatially closer to something

    4. the temporal property of becoming nearer in time



    Definition of coming by GCIDE Dictionary

    coming


    1. Come v. i. [imp. Came ; p. p. Come ; p. pr & vb. n. Coming.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire ( gvenire ), Gr. to go, Skr. gam. √23. Cf. Base, n., Convene, Adventure.]
      1. To move hitherward; to draw near; to approach the speaker, or some place or person indicated; -- opposed to go.

      Look, who comes yonder? Shak.

      I did not come to curse thee. Tennyson.

      2. To complete a movement toward a place; to arrive.

      When we came to Rome. Acts xxviii. 16.

      Lately come from Italy. Acts xviii. 2.

      3. To approach or arrive, as if by a journey or from a distance. “Thy kingdom come.” Matt. vi. 10.

      The hour is coming, and now is. John. v. 25.

      So quick bright things come to confusion. Shak.

      4. To approach or arrive, as the result of a cause, or of the act of another.

      From whence come wars? James iv. 1.

      Both riches and honor come of thee ! 1 Chron. xxix. 12.

      5. To arrive in sight; to be manifest; to appear.

      Then butter does refuse to come. Hudibras.

      6. To get to be, as the result of change or progress; -- with a predicate; as, “to come untied”.

      How come you thus estranged? Shak.

      How come her eyes so bright? Shak.

      ☞ Am come, is come, etc., are frequently used instead of have come, has come, etc., esp. in poetry. The verb to be gives a clearer adjectival significance to the participle as expressing a state or condition of the subject, while the auxiliary have expresses simply the completion of the action signified by the verb.

      Think not that I am come to destroy. Matt. v. 17.

      We are come off like Romans. Shak.

      The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the year. Bryant.

      Come may properly be used ( instead of go ) in speaking of a movement hence, or away, when there is reference to an approach to the person addressed; as, I shall come home next week; he will come to your house to-day. It is used with other verbs almost as an auxiliary, indicative of approach to the action or state expressed by the verb; as, how came you to do it? Come is used colloquially, with reference to a definite future time approaching, without an auxiliary; as, it will be two years, come next Christmas; i. e., when Christmas shall come.

      They were cried

      In meeting, come next Sunday. Lowell.

      Come, in the imperative, is used to excite attention, or to invite to motion or joint action; come, let us go. “This is the heir; come, let us kill him.” Matt. xxi. 38. When repeated, it sometimes expresses haste, or impatience, and sometimes rebuke. “Come, come, no time for lamentation now.” Milton.

      To come, yet to arrive, future. “In times to come.” Dryden. “There's pippins and cheese to come.” Shak. -- To come about. To come to pass; to arrive; to happen; to result; as, how did these things come about? To change; to come round; as, the ship comes about. “The wind is come about.” Shak.

      On better thoughts, and my urged reasons,

      They are come about, and won to the true side. B. Jonson.

      -- To come abroad. To move or be away from one's home or country. “Am come abroad to see the world.” Shak. To become public or known. [Obs.] “Neither was anything kept secret, but that it should come abroad.” Mark. iv. 22. -- To come across, to meet; to find, esp. by chance or suddenly. “We come across more than one incidental mention of those wars.” E. A. Freeman. “Wagner's was certainly one of the strongest and most independent natures I ever came across.” H. R. Haweis. -- To come after. To follow. To come to take or to obtain; as, “to come after a book.” -- To come again, to return. “His spirit came again and he revived.” Judges. xv. 19. - - To come and go. To appear and disappear; to change; to alternate. “The color of the king doth come and go.” Shak. ( Mech. ) To play backward and forward. -- To come at. To reach; to arrive within reach of; to gain; as, “to come at a true knowledge of ourselves.” To come toward; to attack; as, “he came at me with fury.” -- To come away,
      to part or depart. -- To come between, to intervene; to separate; hence, to cause estrangement. -- To come by. To obtain, gain, acquire. “Examine how you came by all your state.” Dryden. To pass near or by way of. -- To come down. To descend. To be humbled. -- To come down upon, to call to account, to reprimand. [Colloq.] Dickens. -- To come home. To return to one's house or family. To come close; to press closely; to touch the feelings, interest, or reason. ( Naut. ) To be loosened from the ground; -- said of an anchor. -- To come in. Come v. i. [imp. Came ; p. p. Come ; p. pr & vb. n. Coming.] [OE. cumen, comen, AS. cuman; akin to OS.kuman, D. komen, OHG. queman, G. kommen, Icel. koma, Sw. komma, Dan. komme, Goth. giman, L. venire ( gvenire ), Gr. to go, Skr. gam. √23. Cf. Base, n., Convene, Adventure.]
      1. To move hitherward; to draw near; to approach the speaker, or some place or person indicated; -- opposed to go.

      Look, who comes yonder? Shak.

      I did not come to curse thee. Tennyson.

      2. To complete a movement toward a place; to arrive.

      When we came to Rome. Acts xxviii. 16.

      Lately come from Italy. Acts xviii. 2.

      3. To approach or arrive, as if by a journey or from a distance. “Thy kingdom come.” Matt. vi. 10.

      The hour is coming, and now is. John. v. 25.

      So quick bright things come to confusion. Shak.

      4. To approach or arrive, as the result of a cause, or of the act of another.

      From whence come wars? James iv. 1.

      Both riches and honor come of thee ! 1 Chron. xxix. 12.

      5. To arrive in sight; to be manifest; to appear.

      Then butter does refuse to come. Hudibras.

      6. To get to be, as the result of change or progress; -- with a predicate; as, “to come untied”.

      How come you thus estranged? Shak.

      How come her eyes so bright? Shak.

      ☞ Am come, is come, etc., are frequently used instead of have come, has come, etc., esp. in poetry. The verb to be gives a clearer adjectival significance to the participle as expressing a state or condition of the subject, while the auxiliary have expresses simply the completion of the action signified by the verb.

      Think not that I am come to destroy. Matt. v. 17.

      We are come off like Romans. Shak.

      The melancholy days are come, the saddest of the year. Bryant.

      Come may properly be used ( instead of go ) in speaking of a movement hence, or away, when there is reference to an approach to the person addressed; as, I shall come home next week; he will come to your house to-day. It is used with other verbs almost as an auxiliary, indicative of approach to the action or state expressed by the verb; as, how came you to do it? Come is used colloquially, with reference to a definite future time approaching, without an auxiliary; as, it will be two years, come next Christmas; i. e., when Christmas shall come.

      They were cried

      In meeting, come next Sunday. Lowell.

      Come, in the imperative, is used to excite attention, or to invite to motion or joint action; come, let us go. “This is the heir; come, let us kill him.” Matt. xxi. 38. When repeated, it sometimes expresses haste, or impatience, and sometimes rebuke. “Come, come, no time for lamentation now.” Milton.

      To come, yet to arrive, future. “In times to come.” Dryden. “There's pippins and cheese to come.” Shak. -- To come about. To come to pass; to arrive; to happen; to result; as, how did these things come about? To change; to come round; as, the ship comes about. “The wind is come about.” Shak.

      On better thoughts, and my urged reasons,

      They are come about, and won to the true side. B. Jonson.

      -- To come abroad. To move or be away from one's home or country. “Am come abroad to see the world.” Shak. To become public or known. [Obs.] “Neither was anything kept secret, but that it should come abroad.” Mark. iv. 22. -- To come across, to meet; to find, esp. by chance or suddenly. “We come across more than one incidental mention of those wars.” E. A. Freeman. “Wagner's was certainly one of the strongest and most independent natures I ever came across.” H. R. Haweis. -- To come after. To follow. To come to take or to obtain; as, “to come after a book.” -- To come again, to return. “His spirit came again and he revived.” Judges. xv. 19. - - To come and go. To appear and disappear; to change; to alternate. “The color of the king doth come and go.” Shak. ( Mech. ) To play backward and forward. -- To come at. To reach; to arrive within reach of; to gain; as, “to come at a true knowledge of ourselves.” To come toward; to attack; as, “he came at me with fury.” -- To come away,
      to part or depart. -- To come between, to intervene; to separate; hence, to cause estrangement. -- To come by. To obtain, gain, acquire. “Examine how you came by all your state.” Dryden. To pass near or by way of. -- To come down. To descend. To be humbled. -- To come down upon, to call to account, to reprimand. [Colloq.] Dickens. -- To come home. To return to one's house or family. To come close; to press closely; to touch the feelings, interest, or reason. ( Naut. ) To be loosened from the ground; -- said of an anchor. -- To come in. Come v. i. [
    2. Coming a.
      1. Approaching; of the future, especially the near future; the next; as, “the coming week or year; the coming exhibition”.

      Welcome the coming, speed the parting, guest. Pope.

      Your coming days and years. Byron.

      2. Ready to come; complaisant; fond. [Obs.] Pope.

    3. Coming, n.
      1. Approach; advent; manifestation; as, “the coming of the train”.

      2. Specifically: The Second Advent of Christ, called usually the second coming.

      Coming in. Entrance; entrance way; manner of entering; beginning. “The goings out thereof, and the comings in thereof.” Ezek. xliii. 11 Income or revenue. “What are thy comings in?” Shak.