Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of conversation
Meaning of conversation by Wiktionary Dictionary

conversation


    Etymology

    From Old French conversation, from Latin conversātiōnem, accusative singular of conversātiō ( “conversation” ), from conversor ( “abide, keep company with” ) .

    Pronunciation

    • ( UK ) IPA: /ˌkɒnvəˈseɪʃən/
    • ( US ) IPA: /ˌkɑnvɚˈseɪʃən/
    • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

    Noun

    conversation ( plural: conversations )

    1. ( obsolete ) Interaction; commerce or intercourse with other people; dealing with others. [14th-18th c.]
    2. ( archaic ) Behaviour, the way one conducts oneself; a person's way of life. [from 14th c.]
    3. ( obsolete ) Sexual intercourse. [16th-19th c.]
    4. Expression and exchange of individual ideas through talking with other people; also, a set instance or occasion of such talking. [from 16th c.]
      I had an interesting conversation with Nicolas yesterday about how much he's getting paid .
    5. ( fencing ) The back-and-forth play of the blades in a bout .

    Related terms

    Derived terms

    Usage notes

    Verb

    conversation ( third-person singular simple present conversations present participle conversationing, simple past and past participle conversationed )

    1. ( nonstandard, ambitransitive ) To engage in conversation ( with ).

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Explanation of conversation by Wordnet Dictionary

conversation


    Noun
    1. the use of speech for informal exchange of views or ideas or information etc .



    Definition of conversation by GCIDE Dictionary

    conversation


    1. Conversation n. [OE. conversacio ( in senses 1 & 2 ), OF. conversacion, F. conversation, fr. L. conversatio frequent abode in a place, intercourse, LL. also, manner of life.]
      1. General course of conduct; behavior. [Archaic]

      Let your conversation be as it becometh the gospel. Philip. i. 27.

      2. Familiar intercourse; intimate fellowship or association; close acquaintance. “Conversation with the best company.” Dryden.

      I set down, out of long experience in business and much conversation in books, what I thought pertinent to this business. Bacon.

      3. Commerce; intercourse; traffic. [Obs.]

      All traffic and mutual conversation. Hakluyt.

      4. Colloquial discourse; oral interchange of sentiments and observations; informal dialogue.

      The influence exercised by his [Johnson's] conversation was altogether without a parallel. Macaulay.

      5. Sexual intercourse; as, “criminal conversation”.

      Syn. -- Intercourse; communion; commerce; familiarity; discourse; dialogue; colloquy; talk; chat. -- Conversation, Talk. There is a looser sense of these words, in which they are synonymous; there is a stricter sense, in which they differ. Talk is usually broken, familiar, and versatile. Conversation is more continuous and sustained, and turns ordinarily upon topics or higher interest. Children talk to their parents or to their companions; men converse together in mixed assemblies. Dr. Johnson once remarked, of an evening spent in society, that there had been a great deal of talk, but no conversation.