Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of dead
Meaning of dead by Wiktionary Dictionary

dead


    Etymology

    From Middle English ded, deed, from Old English dēad

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: dĕd, IPA: /dɛd/, X-SAMPA: /dEd/
    • Rhymes: -ɛd
    • ( New Zealand ) Homophone: did

    Adjective

    dead ( comparative deader, superlative deadest )

    1. ( not comparable ) No longer living .
      All of my grandparents are dead .
    2. ( hyperbolic ) Figuratively, not alive; lacking life
    3. ( of another person ) So hated that they are absolutely ignored .
      He is dead to me .
    4. Without emotion .
      She stood with dead face and limp arms, unresponsive to my plea .
    5. Stationary; static .
      the dead load on the floor; a dead lift .
    6. Without interest to one of the senses; dull; flat .
      dead air; a dead glass of soda .
    7. Unproductive .
      dead time; dead fields; also in compounds .
    8. ( not comparable, of a machine, device, or electrical circuit ) Completely inactive; without power; without a signal .
      OK, the circuit’s dead. Go ahead and cut the wire .
      Now that the motor’s dead you can reach in and extract the spark plugs .
    9. ( not comparable ) Broken or inoperable .
      That monitor is dead; don’t bother hooking it up .
    10. ( not comparable ) No longer used or required .
      There are several dead laws still on the books regulating where horses may be hitched .
      Is this beer glass dead?
    11. ( not comparable, sports ) Not in play .
      Once the ball crosses the foul line, it’s dead .
    12. ( not comparable ) Full and complete .
      dead stop; dead sleep; dead giveaway; dead silence
    13. ( not comparable ) Exact .
      dead center; dead aim; a dead eye; a dead level
    14. Experiencing pins and needles ( paresthesia ) .
      After sitting on my hands for a while, my arms became dead .
    15. ( informal ) ( Certain to be ) in big trouble .
      "You come back here this instant! Oh, when I get my hands on you, you're dead, mister!"

    Quotations

    Synonyms

    • See also Wikisaurus:dead

    Antonyms

    Noun

    dead ( plural: dead )

    1. singular Time when coldness, darkness, or stillness is most intense .
      The dead of night. The dead of winter .
    2. plural Those who have died .
      Have respect for the dead .

    Synonyms

    Adverb

    dead ( not comparable )

    1. Exactly right .
      He hit the target dead in the centre .
    2. ( slang ) Very, absolutely, extremely, suddenly .
      She’s dead sexy .
      He’s dead stupid .
      I’m dead tired .
      That’s dead sure!

    Verb

    dead ( third-person singular simple present deads present participle deading, simple past and past participle deaded )

    1. ( transitive ) to prevent by disabling; stop

    Related terms

    Statistics

    • frequency based on Project Gutenberg corpus">Most common English words before 1923: boy · c. · strong · #398: dead · bring · returned · seems

    Anagrams

    • adde, Dade, Edda

    Etymology

    Proto-Germanic *daudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰautós, originally a past participle. Cognate with Old Frisian dād ( West Frisian dead ), Old Saxon dōd, Dutch dood, Old High German tōt ( German tot ), Old Norse dauðr ( Swedish död ), Gothic ���������� ( dauþs ) .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /dæːɑd/

    Adjective

    dēad

    1. dead

    Declension

    WeakStrongsingularpluralsingularpluralmnfmnfmnfnominativedēadadēadedēadedēadannom.dēaddēadedēaddēada, -eaccusativedēadandēadedēadanacc.dēadnedēaddēadedēadedēaddēada, -egenitivedēadandēadra, dēadenagen.dēadesdēadesdēadredēadradativedēadandēadumdat.dēadumdēadumdēadredēaduminstrumentaldēade


    Related terms

    • dēaþ

    See also



Explanation of dead by Wordnet Dictionary

dead


    Adverb
    1. completely and without qualification

    2. you can be dead sure of my innocence
      was dead tired
      dead right
    3. quickly and without warning

    Adjective
    1. devoid of activity

    2. this is a dead town; nothing ever happens here
    3. physically inactive

    4. Crater Lake is in the crater of a dead volcano of the Cascade Range
    5. no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life

    6. the nerve is dead
      a dead pallor
      he was marked as a dead man by the assassin
    7. not showing characteristics of life especially the capacity to sustain life

    8. Mars is a dead planet
      dead soil
      dead coals
      the fire is dead
    9. drained of electric charge

    10. a dead battery
    11. complete

    12. came to a dead stop
    13. no longer having force or relevance

    14. a dead issue
    15. out of use or operation because of a fault or breakdown

    16. a dead telephone line
      the motor is dead
    17. lacking resilience or bounce

    18. a dead tennis ball
    19. not surviving in active use

    20. Latin is a dead language
    21. not circulating or flowing

    22. dead air
      dead water
    23. unerringly accurate

    24. a dead shot
      took dead aim
    25. not yielding a return

    26. dead capital
    27. lacking acoustic resonance

    28. dead sounds characteristic of some compact discs
      the dead wall surfaces of a recording studio
    29. devoid of physical sensation

    30. his gums were dead from the novocain
      she felt no discomfort as the dentist drilled her deadened tooth
    31. not showing human feeling or sensitivity

    32. passersby were dead to our plea for help
    33. very tired

    34. I'm dead after that long trip
    Noun
    1. people who are no longer living

    2. they buried the dead
    3. a time when coldness ( or some other quality associated with death ) is intense

    4. the dead of winter


    Definition of dead by GCIDE Dictionary

    dead


    1. Dead ( dĕd ), a. [OE. ded, dead, deed, AS. deád; akin to OS. dōd, D. dood, G. todt, tot, Icel. dauðr, Sw. & Dan. död, Goth. daubs; prop. p. p. of an old verb meaning to die. See Die, and cf. Death.]
      1. Deprived of life; -- opposed to alive and living; reduced to that state of a being in which the organs of motion and life have irrevocably ceased to perform their functions; as, “a dead tree; a dead man.” “The queen, my lord, is dead.” Shak.

      The crew, all except himself, were dead of hunger. Arbuthnot.

      Seek him with candle, bring him dead or living. Shak.

      2. Destitute of life; inanimate; as, “dead matter”.

      3. Resembling death in appearance or quality; without show of life; deathlike; as, “a dead sleep”.

      4. Still as death; motionless; inactive; useless; as, “dead calm; a dead load or weight.”

      5. So constructed as not to transmit sound; soundless; as, “a dead floor”.

      6. Unproductive; bringing no gain; unprofitable; as, “dead capital; dead stock in trade.”

      7. Lacking spirit; dull; lusterless; cheerless; as, “dead eye; dead fire; dead color, etc.”

      8. Monotonous or unvaried; as, “a dead level or pain; a dead wall.” “The ground is a dead flat.” C. Reade.

      9. Sure as death; unerring; fixed; complete; as, “a dead shot; a dead certainty.”

      I had them a dead bargain. Goldsmith.

      10. Bringing death; deadly. Shak.

      11. Wanting in religious spirit and vitality; as, “dead faith; dead works.” “Dead in trespasses.” Eph. ii. 1.

      12. ( Paint. ) Flat; without gloss; -- said of painting which has been applied purposely to have this effect. Not brilliant; not rich; “dead color, as compared with crimson”.

      13. ( Law ) Cut off from the rights of a citizen; deprived of the power of enjoying the rights of property; as, “one banished or becoming a monk is civilly dead”.

      14. ( Mach. ) Not imparting motion or power; as, “the dead spindle of a lathe, etc.” See Spindle.

      15. ( Elec. ) Carrying no current, or producing no useful effect; -- said of a conductor in a dynamo or motor, also of a telegraph wire which has no instrument attached and, therefore, is not in use.

      16. Out of play; regarded as out of the game; -- said of a ball, a piece, or a player under certain conditions in cricket, baseball, checkers, and some other games.

      [In golf], a ball is said to lie dead when it lies so near the hole that the player is certain to hole it in the next stroke. Encyc. of Sport.

      Dead ahead ( Naut. ), directly ahead; -- said of a ship or any object, esp. of the wind when blowing from that point toward which a vessel would go. -- Dead angle ( Mil. ), an angle or space which can not be seen or defended from behind the parapet. -- Dead block, either of two wooden or iron blocks intended to serve instead of buffers at the end of a freight car. -- Dead calm ( Naut. ), no wind at all. -- Dead center, or Dead point ( Mach. ), either of two points in the orbit of a crank, at which the crank and connecting rod lie a straight line. It corresponds to the end of a stroke; as, A and B are dead centers of the crank mechanism in which the crank C drives, or is driven by, the lever L. -- Dead color ( Paint. ), a color which has no gloss upon it. -- Dead coloring ( Oil paint. ), the layer of colors, the preparation for what is to follow. In modern painting this is usually in monochrome. -- Dead door ( Shipbuilding ), a storm shutter fitted to the outside of the quarter-gallery door. -- Dead flat ( Naut. ), the
      widest or midship frame. -- Dead freight ( Mar. Law ), a sum of money paid by a person who charters a whole vessel but fails to make out a full cargo. The payment is made for the unoccupied capacity. Abbott. -- Dead ground ( Mining ), the portion of a vein in which there is no ore. -- Dead hand, a hand that can not alienate, as of a person civilly dead. “Serfs held in dead hand.” Morley. See Mortmain. -- Dead head ( Naut. ), a rough block of wood used as an anchor buoy. -- Dead heat, a heat or course between two or more race horses, boats, etc., in which they come out exactly equal, so that neither wins. -- Dead horse, an expression applied to a debt for wages paid in advance. [Law] -- Dead language, a language which is no longer spoken or in common use by a people, and is known only in writings, as the Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. -- Dead letter. A letter which, after lying for a certain fixed time uncalled for at the post office to which it was directed, is then sent to the general post office to be opened.
      That which has lost its force or authority; as, the law has become a dead letter. -- Dead-letter office, a department of the general post office where dead letters are examined and disposed of. -- Dead level, a term applied to a flat country. -- Dead lift, a direct lift, without assistance from mechanical advantage, as from levers, pulleys, etc.; hence, an extreme emergency. “( As we say ) at a dead lift.” Robynson ( More's Utopia ). ( Weighlifting ) The lifting of a weight from the ground, without raising it to the shoulders. -- Dead line ( Mil. ), a line drawn within or around a military prison, to cross which involves for a prisoner the penalty of being instantly sDead ( dĕd ), a. [OE. ded, dead, deed, AS. deád; akin to OS. dōd, D. dood, G. todt, tot, Icel. dauðr, Sw. & Dan. död, Goth. daubs; prop. p. p. of an old verb meaning to die. See Die, and cf. Death.]
      1. Deprived of life; -- opposed to alive and living; reduced to that state of a being in which the organs of motion and life have irrevocably ceased to perform their functions; as, “a dead tree; a dead man.” “The queen, my lord, is dead.” Shak.

      The crew, all except himself, were dead of hunger. Arbuthnot.

      Seek him with candle, bring him dead or living. Shak.

      2. Destitute of life; inanimate; as, “dead matter”.

      3. Resembling death in appearance or quality; without show of life; deathlike; as, “a dead sleep”.

      4. Still as death; motionless; inactive; useless; as, “dead calm; a dead load or weight.”

      5. So constructed as not to transmit sound; soundless; as, “a dead floor”.

      6. Unproductive; bringing no gain; unprofitable; as, “dead capital; dead stock in trade.”

      7. Lacking spirit; dull; lusterless; cheerless; as, “dead eye; dead fire; dead color, etc.”

      8. Monotonous or unvaried; as, “a dead level or pain; a dead wall.” “The ground is a dead flat.” C. Reade.

      9. Sure as death; unerring; fixed; complete; as, “a dead shot; a dead certainty.”

      I had them a dead bargain. Goldsmith.

      10. Bringing death; deadly. Shak.

      11. Wanting in religious spirit and vitality; as, “dead faith; dead works.” “Dead in trespasses.” Eph. ii. 1.

      [
    2. Dead ( dĕd ), adv. To a degree resembling death; to the last degree; completely; wholly. [Colloq.]

      I was tired of reading, and dead sleepy. Dickens.

      Dead drunk, so drunk as to be unconscious.

    3. Dead ( dĕd ), n.
      1. The most quiet or deathlike time; the period of profoundest repose, inertness, or gloom; as, “the dead of winter”.

      When the drum beat at dead of night. Campbell.

      2. One who is dead; -- commonly used collectively.

      And Abraham stood up from before his dead. Gen. xxiii. 3.

    4. Dead, v. t. To make dead; to deaden; to deprive of life, force, or vigor. [Obs.]

      Heaven's stern decree,

      With many an ill, hath numbed and deaded me. Chapman.

    5. Dead, v. i. To die; to lose life or force. [Obs.]

      So iron, as soon as it is out of the fire, deadeth straightway. Bacon.

    6. Sainted, a.
      1. Consecrated; sacred; holy; pious. “A most sainted king.” Shak.

      Amongst the enthroned gods on sainted seats. Milton.

      2. Entered into heaven; -- a euphemism for dead.