Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of dis-
Meaning of dis- by Wiktionary Dictionary

dis-


    Etymology

    From Middle English, from Old French des-, from Latin dis- .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /dɪs/

    Preposition

    dis-

    1. reversal or removal
      disassociate
      disarray
    2. apart
      disconnect
    3. Used as an intensifier of words with negative valence .
      disembowel
      disannul

    Usage notes

    When attached to a verbal root, prefixes often change the first vowel ( whether initial or preceded by a consonant/consonant cluster ) of that verb. These phonological changes took place in Latin and usually do not apply to words created ( as in Modern Latin ) from Latin components since Latin became a 'dead' language. Note: the combination of prefix and following vowel did not always yield the same change. ( see examples below at con- + -a- ) Also, these changes in vowels are not necessarily particular to being prefixed with dis- ( i.e. other prefixes sometimes cause the same vowel change- see con-, ex- ) .

    Derived terms

    See also


    Dis

    By Wiktionary ( 2010/07/28 08:40 UTC Version )

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: dĭs, IPA: /dɪs/, SAMPA: /dIs/
      Rhymes: -ɪs
    • Homophone: dis, diss

    Proper noun

    Dis

    1. Alternative name for Hades .

    See also

    • Dis Pater on Wikipedia .

    Anagrams

    • ids, IDs, IDS
    • ISD
    • SDI
    • Sid



Definition of dis- by GCIDE Dictionary

dis-


  1. dis- ( ?; 258 )
    1. A prefix from the Latin, whence F. dés, or sometimes dé-, dis-. The Latin dis-appears as di-before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, v, becomes dif-before f, and either dis-or di- before j. It is from the same root as bis twice, and duo, E. two. See Two, and cf. Bi-, Di-, Dia-. Dis- denotes separation, a parting from, as in distribute, disconnect; hence it often has the force of a privative and negative, as in disarm, disoblige, disagree. Also intensive, as in dissever.

    ☞ Walker's rule of pronouncing this prefix is, that the s ought always to be pronounced like z, when the next syllable is accented and begins with “a flat mute [b, d, v, g, z], a liquid [l, m, n, r], or a vowel; as, disable, disease, disorder, disuse, disband, disdain, disgrace, disvalue, disjoin, dislike, dislodge, dismay, dismember, dismiss, dismount, disnatured, disrank, disrelish, disrobe.” Dr. Webster's example in disapproving of Walker's rule and pronouncing dis-as diz in only one ( disease ) of the above words, is followed by recent orthoëpists. See Disable, Disgrace, and the other words, beginning with dis-, in this Dictionary.

    2. A prefix from Gr. δίσ- twice. See Di-.