Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of discrete
Meaning of discrete by Wiktionary Dictionary

discrete


    Etymology

    From Old French discret, from Latin discretus, from past participle of discernere .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /dɪsˈkɹiːt/
    • Homophone: discreet
    • Rhymes: -iːt

    Adjective

    discrete ( comparative more discrete, superlative most discrete )

    1. Separate; distinct; individual; Non-continuous .
    2. That can be perceived individually and not as connected to, or part of something else .
    3. ( electrical 工学 ) Having separate electronic components, such as individual resistors and inductorsthe opposite of integrated circuitry .
    4. ( audio 工学 ) Having separate and independent channels of audio, as opposed to multiplexed stereo or quadraphonic, or other multi-channel sound .
    5. ( topology ) Having each singleton subset open: said of a topological space or a topology .

    Usage notes

    Antonyms

    Anagrams



Explanation of discrete by Wordnet Dictionary

discrete


    Adjective
    1. constituting a separate entity or part

    2. a government with three discrete divisions


    Definition of discrete by GCIDE Dictionary

    discrete


    1. Discrete a. [L. discretus, p. p. of discernere. See Discreet.]
      1. Separate; distinct; disjunct. Sir M. Hale.

      2. Disjunctive; containing a disjunctive or discretive clause; as, ““I resign my life, but not my honor,” is a discrete proposition”.

      3. ( Bot. ) Separate; not coalescent; -- said of things usually coalescent.

      Discrete movement. See Concrete movement of the voice, under Concrete, a. -- Discrete proportion, proportion where the ratio of the means is different from that of either couplet; as, 3:6::8:16, 3 bearing the same proportion to 6 as 8 does to 16. But 3 is not to 6 as 6 to 8. It is thus opposed to continued or continual proportion; as, 3:6::12:24. -- Discrete quantity, that which must be divided into units, as number, and is opposed to continued quantity, as duration, or extension.

    2. Discrete, v. t. To separate. [Obs.] Sir T. Browne.