Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of done
Meaning of done by Wiktionary Dictionary

done


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /ˈdʌn/, X-SAMPA: /"dVn/
    • Rhymes: -ʌn
    • Homophone: dun, Donn, Donne, Dunn, Dunne

    Adjective

    done ( comparative more done, superlative most done )

    1. ( of food ) Ready, fully cooked .
      As soon as the potatoes are done we can sit down and eat .
    2. In a state of having completed or finished an activity .
      He pushed his empty plate away, sighed and pronounced "I am done."
      They were done playing and were picking up the toys when he arrived .
    3. Being exhausted or fully spent .
      When the water is done we will only be able to go on for a few days .
    4. Without hope or prospect of completion or success .
      He is done, after three falls there is no chance he will be able to finish .
    5. Fashionable, socially acceptable, tasteful .
      I can't believe he just walked up and spoke to her like that, those kind of things just aren't done!
      What is the done thing these days? I can't keep up!

    Derived terms

    Verb

    done

    1. Past participle of do
      I have done my work .
    2. ( African US Vernacular, Southern US English, auxiliary verb, taking a past tense ) Used in forming the perfective aspect .
      I done did my best to raise y'all .

    Statistics

    Anagrams

    • endo, Endo
    • node, NODE


Explanation of done by Wordnet Dictionary

done


    Adjective
    1. cooked until ready to serve

    2. having finished or arrived at completion

    3. certain to make history before he's done
      it's a done deed


    Definition of done by GCIDE Dictionary

    done


    1. do v. t. or auxiliary. [imp. did ( dĭd ); p. p. done ( dŭn ); p. pr. & vb. n. Doing ( dĭng ). This verb, when transitive, is formed in the indicative, present tense, thus: I do, thou doest ( dĕst ) or dost ( dŭst ), he does ( dŭz ), doeth ( dĕth ), or doth ( dŭth ); when auxiliary, the second person is, thou dost. As an independent verb, dost is obsolete or rare, except in poetry. “What dost thou in this world?” Milton. The form doeth is a verb unlimited, doth, formerly so used, now being the auxiliary form. The second pers, sing., imperfect tense, is didst ( dĭdst ), formerly didest ( dĭdĕst ).] [AS. dōn; akin to D. doen, OS. duan, OHG. tuon, G. thun, Lith. deti, OSlav. dēti, OIr. dénim I do, Gr. τιθέναι to put, Skr. dhā, and to E. suffix -dom, and prob. to L. facere to do, E. fact, and perh. to L. -dere in some compounds, as addere to add, credere to trust. √65. Cf. Deed, Deem, Doom, Fact, Creed, Theme.]
      1. To place; to put. [Obs.] Tale of a Usurer ( about 1330 ).

      2. To cause; to make; -- with an infinitive. [Obs.]

      My lord Abbot of Westminster did do shewe to me late certain evidences. W. Caxton.

      I shall . . . your cloister do make. Piers Plowman.

      A fatal plague which many did to die. Spenser.

      We do you to wit [i. e., We make you to know] of the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia. 2 Cor. viii. 1.

      ☞ We have lost the idiom shown by the citations ( do used like the French faire or laisser ), in which the verb in the infinitive apparently, but not really, has a passive signification, i. e., cause . . . to be made.

      3. To bring about; to produce, as an effect or result; to effect; to achieve.

      The neglecting it may do much danger. Shak.

      He waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither good not harm. Shak.

      4. To perform, as an action; to execute; to transact to carry out in action; as, “to do a good or a bad act; do our duty; to do what I can.”

      Six days shalt thou labor and do all thy work. Ex. xx. 9.

      We did not do these things. Ld. Lytton.

      You can not do wrong without suffering wrong. Emerson.

      Hence: To do homage, honor, favor, justice, etc., to render homage, honor, etc.

      5. To bring to an end by action; to perform completely; to finish; to accomplish; -- a sense conveyed by the construction, which is that of the past participle done. “Ere summer half be done.” “I have done weeping.” Shak.



      6. To make ready for an object, purpose, or use, as food by cooking; to cook completely or sufficiently; as, “the meat is done on one side only”.

      7. To put or bring into a form, state, or condition, especially in the phrases, to do death, to put to death; to slay; to do away ( often do away with ), to put away; to remove; to do on, to put on; to don; to do off, to take off, as dress; to doff; to do into, to put into the form of; to translate or transform into, as a text.

      Done to death by slanderous tongues. Shak.

      The ground of the difficulty is done away. Paley.

      Suspicions regarding his loyalty were entirely done away. Thackeray.

      To do on our own harness, that we may not; but we must do on the armor of God. Latimer.

      Then Jason rose and did on him a fair

      Blue woolen tunic. W. Morris ( Jason ).

      Though the former legal pollution be now done off, yet there is a spiritual contagion in idolatry as much to be shunned. Milton.

      It [“Pilgrim's Progress”] has been done into verse: it has been done into modern English. Macaulay.

      8. To cheat; to gull; to overreach. [Colloq.]

      He was not be done, at his time of life, by frivolous offers of a compromise that might have secured him seventy-five per cent. De Quincey.

      9. To see or inspect; to explore; as, “to do all the points of interest”. [Colloq.]

      10. ( Stock Exchange ) To cash or to advance money for, as a bill or note.

      11. To perform work upon, about, for, or at, by way of caring for, looking after, preparing, cleaning, keeping in order, or the like.

      The sergeants seem to do themselves pretty well. Harper's Mag.

      12. To deal with for good and all; to finish up; to undo; to ruin; to do for. [Colloq. or Slang]

      Sometimes they lie in wait in these dark streets, and fracture his skull, . . . or break his arm, or cut the sinew of his wrist; and that they call doing him. Charles Reade.

      ☞ Do and did are much employed as auxiliaries, the verb to which they are joined being an infinitive. As an auxiliary the verb do has no participle. “I do set my bow in the cloud.” Gen. ix. 13. [Now archaic or rare except for emphatic assertion.]

      Rarely . . . did the wrongs of individuals to the knowledge of the public. Macaulay.

      did ( dĭd ); p. p. done ( dŭn ); p. pr. & vb. n. Doing ( dĭng ). This verb, when transitive, is formed in the indicative, present tense, thus: I do, thou doest ( dĕst ) or dost ( dŭst ), he does ( dŭz ), doeth ( dĕth ), or doth ( dŭth ); when auxiliary, the second person is, thou dost. As an independent verb, dost is obsolete or rare, except in poetry. “What dost thou in this world?” Milton. The form doeth is a verb unlimited, doth, formerly so used, now being the auxiliary form. The second pers, sing., imperfect tense, is didst ( dĭdst ), formerly didest ( dĭdĕst ).] [AS. dōn; akin to D. doen, OS. duan, OHG. tuon, G. thun, Lith. deti, OSlav. dēti, OIr. dénim I do, Gr. τιθέναι to put, Skr. dhā, and to E. suffix -dom, and prob. to L. facere to do, E. fact, and perh. to L. -dere in some compounds, as addere to add, credere to trust. √65. Cf. Deed, Deem, Doom, Fact, Creed, Theme.]
      1. To place; to put. [Obs.] Tale of a Usurer ( about 1330 ).

      2. To cause; to make; -- with an infinitive. [Obs.]

      My lord Abbot of Westminster did do shewe to me late certain evidences. W. Caxton.

      I shall . . . your cloister do make. Piers Plowman.

      A fatal plague which many did to die. Spenser.

      We do you to wit [i. e., We make you to know] of the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia. 2 Cor. viii. 1.

      ☞ We have lost the idiom shown by the citations ( do used like the French faire or laisser ), in which the verb in the infinitive apparently, but not really, has a passive signification, i. e., cause . . . to be made.

      3. To bring about; to produce, as an effect or result; to effect; to achieve.

      The neglecting it may do much danger. Shak.

      He waved indifferently 'twixt doing them neither good not harm. Shak.

      4. To perform, as an action; to execute; to transact to carry out in action; as, “to do a good or a bad act; do our duty; to do what I can.”

      Six days shalt thou labor and do all thy work. Ex. xx. 9.

      We did not do these things. Ld. Lytton.

      You can not do wrong without suffering wrong. Emerson.

      Hence: To do homage, honor, favor, justice, etc., to render homage, honor, etc.

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    2. Done p. p. from Do, and formerly the infinitive.
      1. Performed; executed; finished.

      2. It is done or agreed; let it be a match or bargain; -- used elliptically.

      Done brown, a phrase in cookery; applied figuratively to one who has been thoroughly deceived, cheated, or fooled. [Colloq.] -- Done for, tired out; used up; collapsed; destroyed; dead; killed. [Colloq.] -- Done up. Wrapped up. Worn out; exhausted. [Colloq.]

    3. Done, a. [Prob. corrupted from OF. doné, F. donné, p. p. of OF. doner, F. donner, to give, issue, fr. L. donare to give. See Donate, and cf. Donee.] Given; executed; issued; made public; -- used chiefly in the clause giving the date of a proclamation or public act.

    4. Doni n. [Tamil tnī.] ( Naut. ) A clumsy craft, having one mast with a long sail, used for trading purposes on the coasts of Coromandel and Ceylon. [Written also dhony, doney, and done.] Balfour.