Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of embrace
Meaning of embrace by Wiktionary Dictionary

embrace


    Alternative forms

    Etymology

    From Middle English embracen, from Old French embracier, equivalent to em- +‎ brace. Influenced by Middle English umbracen ( “to stretch out over, cover, engulf” ), from um- ( “around” ) + bracen ( “to brace” ) .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /ɪmˈbreɪs/, X-SAMPA: /Im"brEIs/
    • Rhymes: -eɪs

    Verb

    embrace ( third-person singular simple present embraces present participle embracing, simple past and past participle embraced )

    1. hug, put arms around
    2. ( 隠喩的用法 ) enfold, include ( ideas, principles, etc )

    Noun

    embrace ( plural: embraces )

    1. hug ( noun ); putting arms around someone
    2. ( 隠喩的用法 ) enfolding, including


Explanation of embrace by Wordnet Dictionary

embrace


    Verb
    1. take up the cause, ideology, practice, method, of someone and use it as one's own

    2. She embraced Catholicism
    3. squeeze ( someone ) tightly in your arms, usually with fondness

    4. They embraced
    5. include in scope

    Noun
    1. a close affectionate and protective acceptance

    2. his willing embrace of new ideas
    3. the act of clasping another person in the arms ( as in greeting or affection )

    4. the state of taking in or encircling

    5. an island in the embrace of the sea


    Definition of embrace by GCIDE Dictionary

    embrace


    1. Embrace ( ĕmbrās ), v. t. [Pref. em- ( intens. ) + brace, v. t.] To fasten on, as armor. [Obs.] Spenser.

    2. Embrace, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Embraced ( ĕmbrāst ); p. pr. & vb. n. Embracing ( ĕmbrāsĭng ).] [OE. embracier, F. embrasser; pref. em- ( L. in ) + F. bras arm. See Brace, n.]
      1. To clasp in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug.

      I will embrace him with a soldier's arm,

      That he shall shrink under my courtesy. Shak.

      Paul called unto him the disciples, and embraced them. Acts xx. 1.

      2. To cling to; to cherish; to love. Shak.

      3. To seize eagerly, or with alacrity; to accept with cordiality; to welcome. “I embrace these conditions.” “You embrace the occasion.” Shak.

      What is there that he may not embrace for truth? Locke.

      4. To encircle; to encompass; to inclose.

      Low at his feet a spacious plain is placed,

      Between the mountain and the stream embraced. Denham.

      5. To include as parts of a whole; to comprehend; to take in; as, “natural philosophy embraces many sciences”.

      Not that my song, in such a scanty space,

      So large a subject fully can embrace. Dryden.



      6. To accept; to undergo; to submit to. “I embrace this fortune patiently.” Shak.

      7. ( Law ) To attempt to influence corruptly, as a jury or court. Blackstone.

      Syn. -- To clasp; hug; inclose; encompass; include; comprise; comprehend; contain; involve; imply.

    3. Embrace v. i. To join in an embrace.

    4. Embrace, n. Intimate or close encircling with the arms; pressure to the bosom; clasp; hug.

      We stood tranced in long embraces,

      Mixed with kisses. Tennyson.