Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of En-
Meaning of en- by Wiktionary Dictionary

En-


    Preposition

    en-

    1. in, into, on, onto
    2. covered
    3. caused
    4. as an intensifier

    Usage notes

    See also


    -en

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/07/31 03:16 UTC Version )

    Pronunciation

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English -n, -en, past participle ending of strong verbs ( compare Middle English take( n ), took, taken: "take, took, taken" ), from Old Norse -inn, past participle ending of strong verbs ( compare Old Norse taka, tōk, takinn: "take, took, taken" ). Replaced the native past participle ending of strong verbs ( from Old English -en ) in some words, which had weakened to -e or disappeared ( compare Southern Middle English do( n ), dud( e ), ydo : "do, did, done" ), but not in others ( compare cume( n ), com, ycume: "come, came, come" ) .

    Suffix

    -en

    1. Denotes the past participle form when attached to a verb .
      As in take, taken; forgive, forgiven; prove, proven
      The -en suffix is also used formally to denote any English past participle, even if it does not use the suffix .
      Such a use may be described formally as cook + -en > cooked
    2. Denotes a quasi-past participle or participle-like adjective when attached to a noun or verb .
      As in forken ( "forked" )
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    • Proto-Germanic

    From Middle English -n ( in words ending in a vowel: flee: fleen "flea: fleas" ) and -en. Noun plural marker ( predominantly in Southern dialects of Middle English ), from Old English Nominative-Accusative plural ending of Weak nouns ( n-stem declension ); compare nama: naman ( masc. ) "name: names"; hlǣfdige: hlǣfdigan ( fem. ) "lady: ladies"; ēare: ēaran ( neut. ) "ear: ears". Assisted by M.E. dative plural ending -n, -en from late O.E. -un, -on, weakened form of earlier -um. Akin to Old High German n-stem ( compare namo: namon "name: names" ), Latin n-stem ( compare homo: homin- )

    Suffix

    -en

    1. Can be used to denote the plural form of a small number of English words, the majority of whose etymology goes back to the N-stem ( i.e. Weak noun ) declension of Germanic languages .
      Examples: aurochs, aurochsen[2]; bee, been; brother, brethren[2]; child, children[2]; cow, kine; knee, kneen; eye, eyen; hose, hosen; house, housen; ox, oxen[2]; shoe, shoon; sister, sistren; tree, treen
    Usage notes

    No longer productive, outside of occasional humorous use, particularly in computer hacker subculture. Notable examples are boxen, Unixen, VAXen .

    Derived terms

    Etymology 3

    from Middle English -( e )nen, -( e )nien, from Old English -nian, from Proto-Germanic *-inōnan. Cognate with Old Norse -na .

    Suffix

    -en

    1. When attached to certain adjectives, it formed a transitive verb whose meaning is, to make ( adjective ). Usually, the verb is ergative, sometimes not. The same construction could also be done to certain ( fewer ) nouns, as, strengthen, in which case the verb means roughly, to give ( noun ) to .
    solid #DDD">Examples

    From adjectives: whiten, quicken
    From nouns: strengthen, hasten

    Usage notes
    Derived terms

    Etymology 4

    Middle English, from Old English -en, from Proto-Germanic *-īnaz; suffix meaning "made of, consisting of, having the qualities of" applied to nouns to form adjectives. Akin to Old High German -īn, Latin -īnus. See -ine .

    Alternative form

    • -in

    Suffix

    -en

    1. Suffix meaning "pertaining to", "having the qualities of", "resembling", "like" .
      elfin, wolven, peachen
    2. When attached to certain nouns that are the names of a material, it forms an adjective whose meaning is, made of ( noun ). This is a formative pattern with many obsolescent remnants. Changes in the form of the root noun, and the dropping of the "e" in the suffix occur. There are also orphan formations whose root has been lost to the current language .
      Current examples: wood, wooden; gold, golden; brass, brazen
      Obsolete examples: bronze, bronzen; silver, silvern
      Orphan examples: linen ( flax was called lin ) .
    Derived terms

    Etymology 5

    From Middle English, from Old English -en, from the neuter form of -en4 .

    Suffix

    -en

    1. Used to form the diminutives of certain nouns
      chicken
      maiden
      kitten

    See also

    [+] English words suffixed with -en

    See also

    1. ^ Urban Dictionary entry for enlightning
    2. ↑ 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language by David Crystal ( 1995, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0521401798 ), page 200

    Etymology 1

    Proto-Germanic *-īnan

    Suffix

    -en n .

    1. ( causes i-mutation ) used to create diminutive neuter nouns
      mæġden ( “little girl” ), from mæġþ ( “girl, woman” )
      cycen, cicen ( “chick” ), from cocc ( “cock, fowl” )
    Declension
    Neuter

    Etymology 2

    From Proto-Germanic *-njō, *-injō, *-unjō

    Alternative form

    • -in

    Suffix

    -en f .

    1. ( often causes i-mutation ) used to create feminine nouns from other nouns
      gyden "goddess", from god "( male ) god" ( with i-muation )
      þēowen ( “female servant” ), from þēow ( “( male ) servant” ) ( without i-mutation )
    Declension
    Feminine

    Etymology 3

    Proto-Germanic *-īnaz

    Suffix

    -en

    1. ( causes i-mutation ) adjectival suffix meaning "material made of, consisting of"
      gylden ( “golden” ), from gold "gold"
      ǣtren ( “venomous, poisonous” ), from ātor ( “poison” )

    Etymology 4

    Proto-Germanic *-anaz

    Suffix

    -en

    1. ( verbal suffix ) past participle ending of strong verbs
      ġecumen "come"
      ġecorfen "carved"

    Etymology 5

    Proto-Germanic *-an-

    Suffix

    -en

    1. ( adjective suffix ) meaning belonging to or characterized by
      tunglen "of the stars, sidereal, starry", from tungol "star"
      fæderen "paternal, of a father", from fæder "father"
      hunden "canine", from hund "dog, hound"

    EN

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/07/23 18:29 UTC Version )

    Etymology

    The initials of either the Latin Ēthica Nicomachēa or the Ancient Greek Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια ( Ēthika Nikomakheia ) .

    Initialism

    EN

    1. ( academic philosophy ) Nicomachean Ethics

    See also

    • EE



Definition of en- by GCIDE Dictionary

En-


  1. En-
    1. [F. en-, L. in.] A prefix signifying in or into, used in many English words, chiefly those borrowed from the French. Some English words are written indifferently with en-or in-. For ease of pronunciation it is commonly changed to em-before p, b, and m, as in employ, embody, emmew. It is sometimes used to give a causal force, as in enable, enfeeble, to cause to be, or to make, able, or feeble; and sometimes merely gives an intensive force, as in enchasten. See In-.

    2. A prefix from Gr. in, meaning in; as, “encephalon, entomology”. See In-.