Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of entail
Meaning of entail by Wiktionary Dictionary

entail


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /ɛnˈteɪl/
    • Rhymes: -eɪl

    Etymology

    From Old English entaile ( “carving” ), from Old French entaille ( “incision” ), from entailler ( “to cut away” ); from prefix en- + tailler ( “to cut” ), from Late Latin taliare, from Latin talea. Compare late Latin feudum talliatum ( “a fee entailed, i.e., curtailed or limited” ) .

    Noun

    entail ( plural: entails )

    1. That which is entailed. Hence:
      An estate in fee entailed, or limited in descent to a particular class of issue .
      The rule by which the descent is fixed .
    2. ( obsolete ) Delicately carved ornamental work; intaglio.
      • A work of rich entail. — Edmund Spenser .

    Verb

    entail ( third-person singular simple present entails present participle entailing, simple past and past participle entailed )

    1. ( transitive ) To imply or require .
      This activity will entail careful attention to detail .
    2. ( transitive ) To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain line of descendants; -- said especially of an estate; to bestow as a heritage.
    3. ( transitive ) ( obsolete ) To appoint hereditary possessor.
    4. ( transitive ) ( obsolete ) To cut or carve in an ornamental way.
      • Entailed with curious antics. — Edmund Spenser .

    Derived terms

    See also

    Anagrams

    • Latine


Explanation of entail by Wordnet Dictionary

entail


    Verb
    1. limit the inheritance of property to a specific class of heirs

    2. impose, involve, or imply as a necessary accompaniment or result

    3. What does this move entail?
    4. have as a logical consequence

    Noun
    1. the act of entailing property

    2. land received by fee tail



    Definition of entail by GCIDE Dictionary

    entail


    1. Entail n. [OE. entaile carving, OF. entaille, F., an incision, fr. entailler to cut away; pref. en- ( L. in ) + tailler to cut; LL. feudum talliatum a fee entailed, i. e., curtailed or limited. See Tail limitation, Tailor.]
      1. That which is entailed. Hence: ( Law ) An estate in fee entailed, or limited in descent to a particular class of issue. The rule by which the descent is fixed.

      A power of breaking the ancient entails, and of alienating their estates. Hume.

      2. Delicately carved ornamental work; intaglio. [Obs.] “A work of rich entail.” Spenser.

    2. Entail, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Entailed; p. pr. & vb. n. Entailing.] [OE. entailen to carve, OF. entailler. See Entail, n.]
      1. To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain line of descendants; -- said especially of an estate; to bestow as an heritage.

      Allowing them to entail their estates. Hume.

      I here entail

      The crown to thee and to thine heirs forever. Shak.

      2. To appoint hereditary possessor. [Obs.]

      To entail him and his heirs unto the crown. Shak.

      3. To cut or carve in an ornamental way. [Obs.]

      Entailed with curious antics. Spenser.