Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of exact
Meaning of exact by Wiktionary Dictionary

exact


    Etymology

    From Old French, from Medieval Latin exactare, reg., from Latin exactus, perfect passive participle of exigō ( “demand, claim as due" or "measure by a standard, weigh, test” ), from ex ( “out” ) + agō ( “drive” ) .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /ˈɛɡˈzækt/
    • Rhymes: -ækt

    Adjective

    exact ( comparative more exact, superlative most exact )

    1. Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect .
      The clock keeps exact time .
      He paid the exact debt .
      an exact copy of a letter
      exact accounts
    2. Habitually careful to agree with a standard, a rule, or a promise; accurate; methodical; punctual
      a man exact in observing an appointment
      In my doings I was exact .
    3. Precisely or definitely conceived or stated; strict .
    4. ( algebra, of a sequence of groups connected by homomorphisms ) Such that the kernel of one homomorphism is the image of the preceding one .

    Synonyms

    Antonyms

    Derived terms

    External links

    • exact in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
    • exact in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
    • exact at OneLook Dictionary Search


Explanation of exact by Wordnet Dictionary

exact


    Verb
    1. take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs

    2. claim as due or just

    Adjective
    1. ( of ideas, images, representations, expressions ) characterized by perfect conformity to fact or truth

    2. marked by strict and particular and complete accordance with fact

    3. an exact mind
      an exact copy
      hit the exact center of the target


    Definition of exact by GCIDE Dictionary

    exact


    1. Exact a. [L. exactus precise, accurate, p. p. of exigere to drive out, to demand, enforce, finish, determine, measure; ex out + agere to drive; cf. F. exact. See Agent, Act.]
      1. Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect; true; correct; precise; as, “the clock keeps exact time; he paid the exact debt; an exact copy of a letter; exact accounts.”

      I took a great pains to make out the exact truth. Jowett ( Thucyd. )

      2. Habitually careful to agree with a standard, a rule, or a promise; accurate; methodical; punctual; as, “a man exact in observing an appointment; in my doings I was exact.” “I see thou art exact of taste.” Milton.

      3. Precisely or definitely conceived or stated; strict.

      An exact command,

      Larded with many several sorts of reason. Shak.

    2. Exact, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Exacted; p. pr. & vb. n. Exacting.] [From L. exactus, p. p. of exigere; or fr. LL. exactare: cf. OF. exacter. See Exact, a.] To demand or require authoritatively or peremptorily, as a right; to enforce the payment of, or a yielding of; to compel to yield or to furnish; hence, to wrest, as a fee or reward when none is due; -- followed by from or of before the one subjected to exaction; as, “to exact tribute, fees, obedience, etc., from or of some one”.

      He said into them, Exact no more than that which is appointed you. Luke. iii. 13.

      Years of servise past

      From grateful souls exact reward at last Dryden.

      My designs

      Exact me in another place. Massinger.

    3. Exact, v. i. To practice exaction. [R.]

      The anemy shall not exact upon him. Ps. lxxxix. 22.