Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of fallen
Meaning of fallen by Wiktionary Dictionary

fallen


    Pronunciation

    • ( UK ): IPA: /ˈfɔːlən/, X-SAMPA: /"fO:l@n/

    Verb

    fallen

    1. Past participle of fall

    Adjective

    fallen ( not comparable )

    1. having dropped by the force of gravity
      fallen raindrops
    2. ( literary ) killed in battle
      to honor fallen soldiers
    3. having lost one's chastity
      a fallen woman
    4. having collapsed
      a fallen building

    Synonyms

    Derived terms

    Noun

    fallen ( plural: fallen )

    1. ( plural: only; not used in singular form ) The dead
    2. ( plural: only; not used in singular form ) Casualties of battle or war .
    3. ( countable, Christianity ) One who has fallen, as from grace.


Explanation of fallen by Wordnet Dictionary

fallen


    Adjective
    1. killed in battle

    2. to honor fallen soldiers
    3. having lost your chastity

    4. a fallen woman
    5. having fallen in or collapsed

    6. a fallen building
    7. having dropped by the force of gravity

    8. fallen leaves covered the forest floor
      sat on a fallen tree trunk


    Definition of fallen by GCIDE Dictionary

    fallen


    1. Fall ( fal ), v. i. [imp. Fell ( fĕl ); p. p. Fallen ( fal'n ); p. pr. & vb. n. Falling.] [AS. feallan; akin to D. vallen, OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. σφάλλειν to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]
      1. To Descend, either suddenly or gradually; particularly, to descend by the force of gravity; to drop; to sink; as, “the apple falls; the tide falls; the mercury falls in the barometer.”

      I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven. Luke x. 18.

      2. To cease to be erect; to take suddenly a recumbent posture; to become prostrate; to drop; as, “a child totters and falls; a tree falls; a worshiper falls on his knees.”

      I fell at his feet to worship him. Rev. xix. 10.

      3. To find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; -- with into; as, “the river Rhone falls into the Mediterranean”.

      4. To become prostrate and dead; to die; especially, to die by violence, as in battle.

      A thousand shall fall at thy side. Ps. xci. 7.

      He rushed into the field, and, foremost fighting, fell. Byron.

      5. To cease to be active or strong; to die away; to lose strength; to subside; to become less intense; as, “the wind falls”.

      6. To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; -- said of the young of certain animals. Shak.

      7. To decline in power, glory, wealth, or importance; to become insignificant; to lose rank or position; to decline in weight, value, price etc.; to become less; as, “the price falls; stocks fell two points.”

      I am a poor fallen man, unworthy now

      To be thy lord and master. Shak.

      The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished. Sir J. Davies.

      8. To be overthrown or captured; to be destroyed.

      Heaven and earth will witness,

      If Rome must fall, that we are innocent. Addison.

      9. To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin; to depart from the faith; to apostatize; to sin.

      Let us labor therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief. Heb. iv. 11.

      10. To become insnared or embarrassed; to be entrapped; to be worse off than before; as, “to fall into error; to fall into difficulties”.

      11. To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; -- said of the countenance.

      Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell. Gen. iv. 5.

      I have observed of late thy looks are fallen. Addison.

      12. To sink; to languish; to become feeble or faint; as, “our spirits rise and fall with our fortunes”.

      13. To pass somewhat suddenly, and passively, into a new state of body or mind; to become; as, “to fall asleep; to fall into a passion; to fall in love; to fall into temptation.”

      14. To happen; to to come to pass; to light; to befall; to issue; to terminate.

      The Romans fell on this model by chance. Swift.

      Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall. Ruth. iii. 18.

      They do not make laws, they fall into customs. H. Spencer.

      15. To come; to occur; to arrive.

      The vernal equinox, which at the Nicene Council fell on the 21st of March, falls now [1694] about ten days sooner. Holder.

      16. To begin with haste, ardor, or vehemence; to rush or hurry; as, “they fell to blows”.

      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul. Jowett ( Thucyd. ).

      17. To pass or be transferred by chance, lot, distribution, inheritance, or otherwise; as, “the estate fell to his brother; the kingdom fell into the hands of his rivals.”

      18. To belong or appertain.

      If to her share some female errors fall,

      Look on her face, and you'll forget them all. Pope.

      19. To be dropped or uttered carelessly; as, “an unguarded expression fell from his lips; not a murmur fell from him.”

      To fall abroad of ( Naut. ), to strike against; -- applied to one vessel coming into collision with another. -- To fall among, to come among accidentally or unexpectedly. -- To fall astern ( Naut. ), to move or be driven backward; to be left behind; as, a ship falls astern by the force of a current, or when outsailed by another. -- To fall away. To lose flesh; to become lean or emaciated; to pine. To renounce or desert allegiance; to revolt or rebel. To renounce or desert the faith; to apostatize. “These . . . for a while believe, and in time of temptation fall away.” Luke viii. 13. To perish; to vanish; to be lost. “How . . . can the soul . . . fall away into nothing?” Addison. To decline gradually; to fade; to languish, or become faint. “One color falls away by just degrees, and another rises insensibly.” Addison. -- To fall back. To recede or retreat; to give way. Fall ( fal ), v. i. [imp. Fell ( fĕl ); p. p. Fallen ( fal'n ); p. pr. & vb. n. Falling.] [AS. feallan; akin to D.. vallen,
      OS. & OHG. fallan, G. fallen, Icel. Falla, Sw. falla, Dan. falde, Lith. pulti, L. fallere to deceive, Gr. σφάλλειν to cause to fall, Skr. sphal, sphul, to tremble. Cf. Fail, Fell, v. t., to cause to fall.]
      1. To Descend, either suddenly or gradually; particularly, to descend by the force of gravity; to drop; to sink; as, “the apple falls; the tide falls; the mercury falls in the barometer.”

      I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven. Luke x. 18.

      2. To cease to be erect; to take suddenly a recumbent posture; to become prostrate; to drop; as, “a child totters and falls; a tree falls; a worshiper falls on his knees.”

      I fell at his feet to worship him. Rev. xix. 10.

      3. To find a final outlet; to discharge its waters; to empty; -- with into; as, “the river Rhone falls into the Mediterranean”.

      4. To become prostrate and dead; to die; especially, to die by violence, as in battle.

      A thousand shall fall at thy side. Ps. xci. 7.

      He rushed into the field, and, foremost fighting, fell. Byron.

      5. To cease to be active or strong; to die away; to lose strength; to subside; to become less intense; as, “the wind falls”.

      6. To issue forth into life; to be brought forth; -- said of the young of certain animals. Shak.

      7. To decline in power, glory, wealth, or importance; to become insignificant; to lose rank or position; to decline in weight, value, price etc.; to become less; as, “the price falls; stocks fell two points.”

      I am a poor fallen man, unworthy now

      To be thy lord and master. Shak.

      The greatness of these Irish lords suddenly fell and vanished. Sir J. Davies.

      8. To be overthrown or captured; to be destroyed.

      Heaven and earth will witness,

      If Rome must fall, that we are innocent. Addison.

      9. To descend in character or reputation; to become degraded; to sink into vice, error, or sin; to depart from the faith; to apostatize; to sin.

      Let us labor therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief. Heb. iv. 11.

      10. To become insnared or embarrassed; to be entrapped; to be worse off than before; as, “to fall into error; to fall into difficulties”.

      11. To assume a look of shame or disappointment; to become or appear dejected; -- said of the countenance.

      Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell. Gen. iv. 5.

      I have observed of late thy looks are fallen. Addison.

      12. To sink; to languish; to become feeble or faint; as, “our spirits rise and fall with our fortunes”.

      13. To pass somewhat suddenly, and passively, into a new state of body or mind; to become; as, “to fall asleep; to fall into a passion; to fall in love; to fall into temptation.”

      14. To happen; to to come to pass; to light; to befall; to issue; to terminate.

      The Romans fell on this model by chance. Swift.

      Sit still, my daughter, until thou know how the matter will fall. Ruth. iii. 18.

      They do not make laws, they fall into customs. H. Spencer.

      15. To come; to occur; to arrive.

      The vernal equinox, which at the Nicene Council fell on the 21st of March, falls now [1694] about ten days sooner. Holder.

      16. To begin with haste, ardor, or vehemence; to rush or hurry; as, “they fell to blows”.

      They now no longer doubted, but fell to work heart and soul. Jowett ( Thucyd. ).

      17. To pass or be transferred by chance, lot, distribution, inheritance, or otherwise; as, “the estate fell to his brother; the kingdom fell into the hands of his rivals.”

      18. To belong or appertain.

      If to her share some female errors fall,

      Look on her face, and you'll forget them all. Pope.

      19. To be dropped or uttered carelessly; as, “an unguarded expression fell from his lips; not a murmur fell from him.”

      To fall abroad of ( Naut. ), to strike against; -- applied to one vessel coming into collision with another. -- To fall among, to come among accidentally or unexpectedly. -- To fall astern ( Naut. ), to mo
    2. Fallen , a. Dropped; prostrate; degraded; ruined; decreased; dead.

      Some ruined temple or fallen monument. Rogers.