Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of felt
Meaning of felt by Wiktionary Dictionary

felt


    Felt cloths.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /fɛlt/, X-SAMPA: /fElt/
    • Rhymes: -ɛlt

    Etymology 1

    Old English felt, from Proto-Germanic *feltaz ( compare Dutch vilt, German Filz, Danish filt ), from Proto-Indo-European *pilto, *pilso 'felt' ( compare Latin pilleus 'felt' ( adj. ), Old Church Slavonic plŭstĭ, Albanian plis, Ancient Greek πῖλος ( pilos ) ), from *pel- 'to beat'. More at anvil .

    Noun

    felt ( uncountable )

    1. A cloth or stuff made of matted fibres of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.
    2. A hat made of felt .
    3. ( obsolete ) A skin or hide; a fell; a pelt.
    Related terms

    Verb

    felt ( third-person singular simple present felts present participle felting, simple past and past participle felted )

    1. ( transitive ) To make into felt, or a feltlike substance; to cause to adhere and mat together .
      ( Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Matthew Hale to this entry? )
    2. ( transitive ) To cover with, or as if with, felt .
      to felt the cylinder of a steam engine

    Etymology 2

    Old English fēled, corresponding to feel +‎ -ed .

    Verb

    felt

    1. Simple past tense and past participle of feel .

    Adjective

    felt ( comparative more felt, superlative most felt )

    1. That has been experienced or perceived.

    Statistics

    Anagrams



Explanation of felt by Wordnet Dictionary

felt


    Verb
    1. change texture so as to become matted and felt-like

    2. The fabric felted up after several washes
    3. cover with felt

    4. felt a cap
    5. mat together and make felt-like

    6. felt the wool
    Noun
    1. a fabric made of compressed matted animal fibers



    Definition of felt by GCIDE Dictionary

    felt


    1. Feel ( fēl ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Felt ( fĕlt ); p. pr. & vb. n. Feeling.] [AS. fēlan; akin to OS. gifōlian to perceive, D. voelen to feel, OHG. fuolen, G. fühlen, Icel. fālma to grope, and prob. to AS. folm palm of the hand, L. palma. Cf. Fumble, Palm.]
      1. To perceive by the touch; to take cognizance of by means of the nerves of sensation distributed all over the body, especially by those of the skin; to have sensation excited by contact of ( a thing ) with the body or limbs.

      Who feel

      Those rods of scorpions and those whips of steel. Creecn.

      2. To touch; to handle; to examine by touching; as, “feel this piece of silk”; hence, to make trial of; to test; often with out.

      Come near, . . . that I may feel thee, my son. Gen. xxvii. 21.

      He hath this to feel my affection to your honor. Shak.

      3. To perceive by the mind; to have a sense of; to experience; to be affected by; to be sensible of, or sensitive to; as, “to feel pleasure; to feel pain.”

      Teach me to feel another's woe. Pope.

      Whoso keepeth the commandment shall feel no evil thing. Eccl. viii. 5.

      He best can paint them who shall feel them most. Pope.

      Mankind have felt their strength and made it felt. Byron.

      4. To take internal cognizance of; to be conscious of; to have an inward persuasion of.

      For then, and not till then, he felt himself. Shak.

      5. To perceive; to observe. [Obs.] Chaucer.

      To feel the helm ( Naut. ), to obey it.


    2. Felt imp. & p. p. or a. from Feel.

    3. Felt n. [AS. felt; akin to D. vilt, G. filz, and possibly to Gr. hair or wool wrought into felt, L. pilus hair, pileus a felt cap or hat.]
      1. A cloth or stuff made of matted fibers of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.

      It were a delicate stratagem to shoe

      A troop of horse with felt. Shak.

      2. A hat made of felt. Thynne.

      3. A skin or hide; a fell; a pelt. [Obs.]

      To know whether sheep are sound or not, see that the felt be loose. Mortimer.

      Felt grain, the grain of timber which is transverse to the annular rings or plates; the direction of the medullary rays in oak and some other timber. Knight.

    4. Felt, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Felted; p. pr. & vb. n. Felting.]
      1. To make into felt, or a feltike substance; to cause to adhere and mat together. Sir M. Hale.

      2. To cover with, or as with, felt; as, “to felt the cylinder of a steam engine”.