Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of for-
Meaning of for- by Wiktionary Dictionary

for-


    Etymology

    From Middle English for-, vor-, from Old English for-, fer-, fær-, fyr- ( “far, away, completely”, prefix ), from the merger of Proto-Germanic *fra- ( "away, away from"; see fro, from ) and Proto-Germanic *fur-, *far- ( “through, completely, fully”, prefix ), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr- ( prefix ). Cognate with Scots for-, West Frisian fer-, for-, Dutch ver-, German ver-, Swedish för-, Danish for-, Norwegian for-, Latin per-. More at for .

    Pronunciation

    • ( stressed ) IPA: /fɔː/
    • ( unstressed ) IPA: /fə/

    Preposition

    for-

    1. ( no longer productive ) Meaning "far", "away"; "from", "out" e.g. forbid, forget, forsay; forbear, fordeem .
    2. ( no longer productive ) Meaning "completely", "to the fullest extent" e.g. fordo; superseded by combinations with "up" in senses where no upward movement is involved, e.g. forgive = give up ( one's offenses ), forgather = "gather up", forbeat = "beat up", etc .
    3. ( dialectal ) Very; excessively .
      forolded ( “very old” )
      fornigh ( “very near” )

    Derived terms

    See also

    Etymology

    Proto-Germanic *fer-, *fur-, *fra- ( “away, far” ), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr- with a variety of meanings including ‘rejection, destruction, prohibition’. Cognate with Old Frisian for-, Old Saxon far-, for-, Dutch ver-, Old High German fir-, far- ( German ver- ), and, outside Germanic, with Ancient Greek περί, Latin per-, Old Church Slavonic пре- ( Russian пере- ) .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /for/

    Preposition

    for-

    1. forming verbs from verbs with various senses especially ‘wrongly, away from, astray, abstention, prohibition, perversion, destruction’
      forwyrcan ( “to do wrong, sin” )
      forstandan ( “to defend, protect, stand for” )
      forweorpan ( “to throw away, cast away, reject” )
      forstelan ( “to steal away, deprive” )
      fordēman ( “to condemn” )
      forlǣdan ( “to mislead” )
    2. used to create intensified adjectives and verbs from other adjectives and verbs, with the sense of completely or fully. Compare Modern English use of up
      forblāwan ( “to blow up, inflate” )
      forstoppian ( “to stop up, block, occlude” )
      forworen ( “decayed, decrepit” )
      forbrocen ( “broken down"; "broken up” )
    3. very
      forlȳtel ( “very little” )

    for

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/08/16 18:42 UTC Version )

    Etymology

    From Middle English for, from Old English for ( “for, on account of, for the sake of, through, because of, owing to, from, by reason of, as to, in order to” ), from Proto-Germanic *furi ( “for” ), from Proto-Indo-European *peri- ( “around” ). Cognate with West Frisian for, foar ( “for” ), Dutch voor ( “for” ), German für ( “for” ), Danish for ( “for” ), Swedish för ( “for” ), Norwegian for ( “for” ), Icelandic fyrir ( “for” ), Latin per ( “by, through, for, by means of” ), Ancient Greek περί ( peri, “for, about, toward” ), Lithuanian per ( “by, through, during” ), Sanskrit परि ( pári, “over, around” ) .

    Pronunciation

    • ( stressed )
      • ( UK ) enPR: fôr, IPA: /fɔː( ɹ )/, X-SAMPA: /fO@( \r )/
      • ( US ) enPR: fôr, IPA: /fɔɹ/, /foʊɹ/, X-SAMPA: /fOr\/
      • Rhymes: -ɔː( r )
    • ( unstressed )
      • ( UK ) IPA: /fə( ɹ )/, X-SAMPA: /f@( \r )/
      • ( US ) IPA: /fɚ/, X-SAMPA: /f@`/
    • Homophone: fore, four

    Conjunction

    for

    1. because
      He lost his job, for he got into trouble .

    Preposition

    for

    1. Towards .
      The astronauts headed for the moon .
    2. Directed at, intended to belong to .
      I have something for you .
    3. Supporting ( opposite of against ) .
      All those for the motion raise your hands .
    4. Because of .
      He wouldn't apologize; and just for that, she refused to help him .
      ( UK usage ) He looks better for having lost weight .
    5. Over a period of time .
      They fought for days over a silly pencil .
    6. On behalf of .
      I will stand in for him .
    7. To obtain .
      I am aiming for completion by end of business Thursday .
      He's going for his doctorate .
      Do you want to go for coffee?
      People all over Greece looked to Delphi for answers .
      Can you go to the store for some eggs?
      I'm saving up for a car .
      Don't wait for an answer .
      What did he ask you for?
    8. In the direction of: marks a point one is going toward .
      Run for the hills!
      He was headed for the door when he remembered .
    9. By the standards of, usually with the implication of those standards being lower than one might otherwise expect .
      Fair for its day .
      She's spry for an old lady .
    10. Despite, in spite of.
    11. Used to indicate the subject of a to-infinitive .
      For that to happen now is incredibly unlikely. ( =It is incredibly unlikely that that will happen now. )
      All I want is for you to be happy. ( =All I want is that you be happy. )
    12. Used to construe various verbs. See the entry for the phrasal verb .

    Antonyms

    • against

    Derived terms

    Statistics

    See also

    • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

    Anagrams

    • fro, 'fro, ORF

    Etymology 1

    From Proto-Germanic *fura

    Preposition

    for

    1. for

    Etymology 2

    see faran

    Noun

    fōr f .

    1. journey, going, course, expedition, approach; passage, lifestyle, way of life
    Declension

    Etymology 3

    Old English

    Noun

    fōr m .

    1. hog, pig
    Declension