Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of for
Meaning of for by Wiktionary Dictionary

for


    Etymology

    From Middle English for, from Old English for ( “for, on account of, for the sake of, through, because of, owing to, from, by reason of, as to, in order to” ), from Proto-Germanic *furi ( “for” ), from Proto-Indo-European *peri- ( “around” ). Cognate with West Frisian for, foar ( “for” ), Dutch voor ( “for” ), German für ( “for” ), Danish for ( “for” ), Swedish för ( “for” ), Norwegian for ( “for” ), Icelandic fyrir ( “for” ), Latin per ( “by, through, for, by means of” ), Ancient Greek περί ( peri, “for, about, toward” ), Lithuanian per ( “by, through, during” ), Sanskrit परि ( pári, “over, around” ) .

    Pronunciation

    • ( stressed )
      • ( UK ) enPR: fôr, IPA: /fɔː( ɹ )/, X-SAMPA: /fO@( \r )/
      • ( US ) enPR: fôr, IPA: /fɔɹ/, /foʊɹ/, X-SAMPA: /fOr\/
      • Rhymes: -ɔː( r )
    • ( unstressed )
      • ( UK ) IPA: /fə( ɹ )/, X-SAMPA: /f@( \r )/
      • ( US ) IPA: /fɚ/, X-SAMPA: /f@`/
    • Homophone: fore, four

    Conjunction

    for

    1. because
      He lost his job, for he got into trouble .

    Preposition

    for

    1. Towards .
      The astronauts headed for the moon .
    2. Directed at, intended to belong to .
      I have something for you .
    3. Supporting ( opposite of against ) .
      All those for the motion raise your hands .
    4. Because of .
      He wouldn't apologize; and just for that, she refused to help him .
      ( UK usage ) He looks better for having lost weight .
    5. Over a period of time .
      They fought for days over a silly pencil .
    6. On behalf of .
      I will stand in for him .
    7. To obtain .
      I am aiming for completion by end of business Thursday .
      He's going for his doctorate .
      Do you want to go for coffee?
      People all over Greece looked to Delphi for answers .
      Can you go to the store for some eggs?
      I'm saving up for a car .
      Don't wait for an answer .
      What did he ask you for?
    8. In the direction of: marks a point one is going toward .
      Run for the hills!
      He was headed for the door when he remembered .
    9. By the standards of, usually with the implication of those standards being lower than one might otherwise expect .
      Fair for its day .
      She's spry for an old lady .
    10. Despite, in spite of.
    11. Used to indicate the subject of a to-infinitive .
      For that to happen now is incredibly unlikely. ( =It is incredibly unlikely that that will happen now. )
      All I want is for you to be happy. ( =All I want is that you be happy. )
    12. Used to construe various verbs. See the entry for the phrasal verb .

    Antonyms

    • against

    Derived terms

    Statistics

    See also

    • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

    Anagrams

    • fro, 'fro, ORF

    Etymology 1

    From Proto-Germanic *fura

    Preposition

    for

    1. for

    Etymology 2

    see faran

    Noun

    fōr f .

    1. journey, going, course, expedition, approach; passage, lifestyle, way of life
    Declension

    Etymology 3

    Old English

    Noun

    fōr m .

    1. hog, pig
    Declension

    for-

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/06/22 17:08 UTC Version )

    Etymology

    From Middle English for-, vor-, from Old English for-, fer-, fær-, fyr- ( “far, away, completely”, prefix ), from the merger of Proto-Germanic *fra- ( "away, away from"; see fro, from ) and Proto-Germanic *fur-, *far- ( “through, completely, fully”, prefix ), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr- ( prefix ). Cognate with Scots for-, West Frisian fer-, for-, Dutch ver-, German ver-, Swedish för-, Danish for-, Norwegian for-, Latin per-. More at for .

    Pronunciation

    • ( stressed ) IPA: /fɔː/
    • ( unstressed ) IPA: /fə/

    Preposition

    for-

    1. ( no longer productive ) Meaning "far", "away"; "from", "out" e.g. forbid, forget, forsay; forbear, fordeem .
    2. ( no longer productive ) Meaning "completely", "to the fullest extent" e.g. fordo; superseded by combinations with "up" in senses where no upward movement is involved, e.g. forgive = give up ( one's offenses ), forgather = "gather up", forbeat = "beat up", etc .
    3. ( dialectal ) Very; excessively .
      forolded ( “very old” )
      fornigh ( “very near” )

    Derived terms

    See also

    Etymology

    Proto-Germanic *fer-, *fur-, *fra- ( “away, far” ), from Proto-Indo-European *pro-, *per-, *pr- with a variety of meanings including ‘rejection, destruction, prohibition’. Cognate with Old Frisian for-, Old Saxon far-, for-, Dutch ver-, Old High German fir-, far- ( German ver- ), and, outside Germanic, with Ancient Greek περί, Latin per-, Old Church Slavonic пре- ( Russian пере- ) .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /for/

    Preposition

    for-

    1. forming verbs from verbs with various senses especially ‘wrongly, away from, astray, abstention, prohibition, perversion, destruction’
      forwyrcan ( “to do wrong, sin” )
      forstandan ( “to defend, protect, stand for” )
      forweorpan ( “to throw away, cast away, reject” )
      forstelan ( “to steal away, deprive” )
      fordēman ( “to condemn” )
      forlǣdan ( “to mislead” )
    2. used to create intensified adjectives and verbs from other adjectives and verbs, with the sense of completely or fully. Compare Modern English use of up
      forblāwan ( “to blow up, inflate” )
      forstoppian ( “to stop up, block, occlude” )
      forworen ( “decayed, decrepit” )
      forbrocen ( “broken down"; "broken up” )
    3. very
      forlȳtel ( “very little” )



Definition of for by GCIDE Dictionary

for


  1. For prep. [AS. for, fore; akin to OS. for, fora, furi, D. voor, OHG. fora, G. vor, OHG. furi, G. für, Icel. fyrir, Sw. för, Dan. for, adv. för, Goth. faúr, faúra, L. pro, Gr. , Skr. pra-. √ 202. Cf. Fore, First, Foremost, Forth, Pro-.] In the most general sense, indicating that in consideration of, in view of, or with reference to, which anything is done or takes place.

    1. Indicating the antecedent cause or occasion of an action; the motive or inducement accompanying and prompting to an act or state; the reason of anything; that on account of which a thing is or is done.

    With fiery eyes sparkling for very wrath. Shak.

    How to choose dogs for scent or speed. Waller.

    Now, for so many glorious actions done,

    For peace at home, and for the public wealth,

    I mean to crown a bowl for Cæsar's health. Dryden.

    That which we, for our unworthiness, are afraid to crave, our prayer is, that God, for the worthiness of his Son, would, notwithstanding, vouchsafe to grant. Hooker.

    2. Indicating the remoter and indirect object of an act; the end or final cause with reference to which anything is, acts, serves, or is done.

    The oak for nothing ill,

    The osier good for twigs, the poplar for the mill. Spenser.

    It was young counsel for the persons, and violent counsel for the matters. Bacon.

    Shall I think the worls was made for one,

    And men are born for kings, as beasts for men,

    Not for protection, but to be devoured? Dryden.

    For he writes not for money, nor for praise. Denham.

    3. Indicating that in favor of which, or in promoting which, anything is, or is done; hence, in behalf of; in favor of; on the side of; -- opposed to against.

    We can do nothing against the truth, but for the truth. 2 Cor. xiii. 8.

    It is for the general good of human society, and consequently of particular persons, to be true and just; and it is for men's health to be temperate. Tillotson.

    Aristotle is for poetical justice. Dennis.

    4. Indicating that toward which the action of anything is directed, or the point toward which motion is made; ntending to go to.

    We sailed from Peru for China and Japan. Bacon.

    5. Indicating that on place of or instead of which anything acts or serves, or that to which a substitute, an equivalent, a compensation, or the like, is offered or made; instead of, or place of.

    And if any mischief follow, then thou shalt give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot. Ex. xxi. 23, 24.

    6. Indicating that in the character of or as being which anything is regarded or treated; to be, or as being.

    We take a falling meteor for a star. Cowley.

    If a man can be fully assured of anything for a truth, without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace for tru? Locke.

    Most of our ingenious young men take up some cried-up English poet for their model. Dryden.

    But let her go for an ungrateful woman. Philips.

    7. Indicating that instead of which something else controls in the performing of an action, or that in spite of which anything is done, occurs, or is; hence, equivalent to notwithstanding, in spite of; -- generally followed by all, aught, anything, etc.

    The writer will do what she please for all me. Spectator.

    God's desertion shall, for aught he knows, the next minute supervene. Dr. H. More.

    For anything that legally appears to the contrary, it may be a contrivance to fright us. Swift.

    8. Indicating the space or time through which an action or state extends; hence, during; in or through the space or time of.

    For many miles about

    There 's scarce a bush. Shak.

    Since, hired for life, thy servile muse sing. prior.

    To guide the sun's bright chariot for a day. Garth.

    9. Indicating that in prevention of which, or through fear of which, anything is done. [Obs.]

    We 'll have a bib, for spoiling of thy doublet. Beau. & Fl.

    For, or As for, so far as concerns; as regards; with reference to; -- used parenthetically or independently. See under As.

    As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord. Josh. xxiv. 15.

    For me, my stormy voyage at an end,

    I to the port of death securely tend. Dryden.

    -- For all that, notwithstanding; in spite of. -- For all the world, wholly; exactly. “Whose posy was, for all the world, like cutlers' poetry.” Shak. -- For as much as, or Forasmuch as, in consideration that; seeing that; since. -- For by. See Forby, adv. -- For ever, eternally; at all times. See Forever. -- For me, or For all me, as far as regards me. -- For prep. [AS. for, fore; akin to OS. for, fora, furi, D. voor, OHG. fora, G. vor, OHG. furi, G. für, Icel. fyrir, Sw. för, Dan. for, adv. för, Goth. faúr, faúra, L. pro, Gr. , Skr. pra-. √ 202. Cf. Fore, First, Foremost, Forth, Pro-.] In the most general sense, indicating that in consideration of, in view of, or with reference to, which anything is done or takes place.

    1. Indicating the antecedent cause or occasion of an action; the motive or inducement accompanying and prompting to an act or state; the reason of anything; that on account of which a thing is or is done.

    With fiery eyes sparkling for very wrath. Shak.

    How to choose dogs for scent or speed. Waller.

    Now, for so many glorious actions done,

    For peace at home, and for the public wealth,

    I mean to crown a bowl for
  2. For conj.
    1. Because; by reason that; for that; indicating, in Old English, the reason of anything.

    And for of long that way had walkéd none,

    The vault was hid with plants and bushes hoar. Fairfax.

    And Heaven defend your good souls, that you think

    I will your serious and great business scant,

    For she with me. Shak.

    2. Since; because; introducing a reason of something before advanced, a cause, motive, explanation, justification, or the like, of an action related or a statement made. It is logically nearly equivalent to since, or because, but connects less closely, and is sometimes used as a very general introduction to something suggested by what has gone before.

    Give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good; for his mercy endureth forever. Ps. cxxxvi. 1.

    Heaven doth with us as we with torches do,

    Not light them for themselves; for if our virtues

    Did not go forth of us, 't were all alike

    As if we had them not. Shak.

    For because, because. [Obs.] “Nor for because they set less store by their own citizens.” Robynson ( More's Utopia ). -- For why. Why; for that reason; wherefore. [Obs.] Because. [Obs.] See Forwhy.

    Syn. -- See Because.

  3. For, n. One who takes, or that which is said on, the affrimative side; that which is said in favor of some one or something; -- the antithesis of against, and commonly used in connection with it.

    The fors and against. those in favor and those opposed; the pros and the cons; the advantages and the disadvantages. Jane Austen.