Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of fright
Meaning of fright by Wiktionary Dictionary

fright


    Etymology

    From Middle English fright, furht, from Old English fryhtu, fyrhto ( “fright, fear, dread, trembling, horrible sight” ), from Proto-Germanic *furhtīn ( “fear” ), from Proto-Indo-European *perg- ( “to frighten; fear” ). Cognate with Scots fricht ( “fright” ), Old Frisian fruchte ( “fright” ), Gothic ( faúrhtei, “fear, horror, fright” ). Also related to Low German frucht ( “fright” ), German Furcht ( “fear, fright” ), Danish frygt ( “fear” ), Swedish fruktan ( “fear, fright, dread” ). Albanian frikë ( “fear, fright, dread, danger” ) and Romanian frǐca ( “fear, fright, dread” ) are also cognates, although probably influenced by an early Germanic variant .

    Pronunciation

    • ( US ) enPR: frīt, IPA: /fɹaɪt/, X-SAMPA: /fraIt/
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    • Rhymes: -aɪt
    • ( Canada ) IPA: /fɹʌit/, X-SAMPA: /frVit/

    Noun

    fright ( countable and uncountable; plural: frights )

    1. A state of terror excited by the sudden appearance of danger; sudden and violent fear, usually of short duration; a sudden alarm.
    2. Anything strange, ugly or shocking, producing a feeling of alarm or aversion.


Explanation of fright by Wordnet Dictionary

fright


    Verb
    1. cause fear in

    2. The stranger who hangs around the building frightens me
      Ghosts could never affright her
    Noun
    1. an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger ( usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight )



    Definition of fright by GCIDE Dictionary

    fright


    1. Fright ( frīt ), n. [OE. frigt, freyht, AS. fyrhto, fyrhtu; akin to OS. forhta, OHG. forhta, forahta, G. furcht, Dan. frygt, Sw. fruktan, Goth. faúrhtei fear, faúrhts timid.]

      1. A state of terror excited by the sudden appearance of danger; sudden and violent fear, usually of short duration; a sudden alarm.

      2. Anything strange, ugly or shocking, producing a feeling of alarm or aversion. [Colloq.]

      Syn. -- Alarm; terror; consternation. See Alarm.

    2. Fright v. t. [imp. Frighted; p. pr. & vb. n.. Frighting.] [OE. frigten to fear, frighten, AS. fyrhtan to frighten, forhtian to fear; akin to OS. forhtian, OHG. furihten, forahtan, G. fürchten, Sw. frukta, Dan. frygte, Goth. faurhtjan. See Fright, n., and cf. Frighten.] To alarm suddenly; to shock by causing sudden fear; to terrify; to scare.

      Nor exile or danger can fright a brave spirit. Dryden.

      Syn. -- To affright; dismay; daunt; intimidate.