Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of giving
Meaning of giving by Wiktionary Dictionary

giving


    Pronunciation

    • Rhymes: -ɪvɪŋ

    Verb

    giving

    1. Present participle of give .
      These bright surfaces are sprayed with a fine spray of ink, thus giving them an even surface.' - First Usenet use via Google Groups, fa.human-nets, 6 May 1981 0359-EDT, Gary Feldman at CMU-10A

    Adjective

    giving ( comparative more giving, superlative most giving )

    1. having the tendency to give; generous
      To become like Christ involves everything else: becoming a loving and giving person, having confidence enabling you to be vulnerable ( psychologically and physically; Jesus did both ), having the wisdom to see people's needs and the desire to meet them. - net.flame - 26 Mar 1984 by Jeff Sargent

    Statistics



Explanation of giving by Wordnet Dictionary

giving


    Adjective
    1. given or giving freely

    2. Saturday's child is loving and giving
    Noun
    1. disposing of property by voluntary transfer without receiving value in return

    2. the alumni followed a program of annual giving
    3. the act of giving

    4. the imparting of news or promises etc .

    5. he gave us the news and made a great show of the giving
      giving his word of honor seemed to come too easily


    Definition of giving by GCIDE Dictionary

    giving


    1. Give ( gĭv ), v. t. [imp. Gave ( gāv ); p. p. Given ( gĭv'n ); p. pr. & vb. n. Giving.] [OE. given, yiven, yeven, AS. gifan, giefan; akin to D. geven, OS. geðan, OHG. geban, G. geben, Icel. gefa, Sw. gifva, Dan. give, Goth. giban. Cf. Gift, n.]
      1. To bestow without receiving a return; to confer without compensation; to impart, as a possession; to grant, as authority or permission; to yield up or allow.

      For generous lords had rather give than pay. Young.

      2. To yield possesion of; to deliver over, as property, in exchange for something; to pay; as, “we give the value of what we buy”.

      What shall a man give in exchange for his soul ? Matt. xvi. 26.

      3. To yield; to furnish; to produce; to emit; as, “flint and steel give sparks”.

      4. To communicate or announce, as advice, tidings, etc.; to pronounce; to render or utter, as an opinion, a judgment, a sentence, a shout, etc.

      5. To grant power or license to; to permit; to allow; to license; to commission.

      It is given me once again to behold my friend. Rowe.

      Then give thy friend to shed the sacred wine. Pope.

      6. To exhibit as a product or result; to produce; to show; as, “the number of men, divided by the number of ships, gives four hundred to each ship”.

      7. To devote; to apply; used reflexively, to devote or apply one's self; as, “the soldiers give themselves to plunder”; also in this sense used very frequently in the past participle; as, “the people are given to luxury and pleasure; the youth is given to study.”

      8. ( Logic & Math. ) To set forth as a known quantity or a known relation, or as a premise from which to reason; -- used principally in the passive form given.

      9. To allow or admit by way of supposition.

      I give not heaven for lost. Mlton.

      10. To attribute; to assign; to adjudge.

      I don't wonder at people's giving him to me as a lover. Sheridan.

      11. To excite or cause to exist, as a sensation; as, “to give offense; to give pleasure or pain.”

      12. To pledge; as, “to give one's word”.

      13. To cause; to make; -- with the infinitive; as, “to give one to understand, to know, etc.”

      But there the duke was given to understand

      That in a gondola were seen together

      Lorenzo and his amorous Jessica. Shak.

      14. To afford a view of; as, “his window gave the park”.

      To give away, to make over to another; to transfer.

      Whatsoever we employ in charitable uses during our lives, is given away from ourselves. Atterbury.

      -- To give back, to return; to restore. Atterbury. -- To give the bag, to cheat. [Obs.]

      I fear our ears have given us the bag. J. Webster.

      -- To give birth to. To bear or bring forth, as a child. To originate; to give existence to, as an enterprise, idea. -- To give chase, to pursue. -- To give ear to. See under Ear. -- To give forth, to give out; to publish; to tell. Hayward. -- To give ground. See under Ground, n. -- To give the hand, to pledge friendship or faith. -- To give the hand of, to espouse; to bestow in marriage. -- To give the head. See under Head, n. -- To give in. To abate; to deduct. To declare; to make known; to announce; to tender; as, “to give in one's adhesion to a party”. -- To give the lie to ( a person ), to tell ( him ) that he lies. -- To give line. See under Line. -- To give off, to emit, as steam, vapor, odor, etc. -- To give one's self away, to make an inconsiderate surrender of one's cause, an unintentional disclosure of one's purposes, or the like. [Colloq.] -- To give out. To utter publicly; to report; to announce or declare.

      One that gives out himself Prince Florizel. Shak.

      Give out you are of Epidamnum. Shak.

      To send out; to emit; to distribute; as, a substance gives out steam or odors. -- To give over. To yield completely; to quit; to abandon. To despair of. To addict, resign, or apply ( one's self ).

      The Babylonians had given themselves over to all manner of vice. Grew.

      -- To give place, to withdraw; to yield one's claim. -- To give points. In games of skill, to equalize chances by conceding a certain advantage; to allow a handicap. To give useful suggestions. [Colloq.] -- To give rein. See under Rein, n. -- To give the sack. Same as To give the bag. -- To give and take. To average gains and losses. To exchange freely, as blows, sarcasms, etc. -- To give time ( Law ), to accord extension or forbearance to a debtor. Abbott. -- To give the time of day, to salute one with the compliment appropriate to the hour, as “good morning.” “good evening”, etc. -- To give tongue, in hunter's phrase, to bark; -- said of dogs. -- To give up. To abandon; to surrender. “Don't give up the ship.Give ( gĭv ), v. t. [imp. Gave ( gāv ); p. p. Given ( gĭv'n ); p. pr. & vb. n. Giving.] [OE. given, yiven, yeven, AS. gifan, giefan; akin to D. geven, OS. geðan, OHG. geban, G. geben, Icel. gefa, Sw. gifva, Dan. give, Goth. giban. Cf. Gift, n.]
      1. To bestow without receiving a return; to confer without compensation; to impart, as a possession; to grant, as authority or permission; to yield up or allow.

      For generous lords had rather give than pay. Young.

      2. To yield possesion of; to deliver over, as property, in exchange for something; to pay; as, “we give the value of what we buy”.

      What shall a man give in exchange for his soul ? Matt. xvi. 26.

      3. To yield; to furnish; to produce; to emit; as, “flint and steel give sparks”.

      4. To communicate or announce, as advice, tidings, etc.; to pronounce; to render or utter, as an opinion, a judgment, a sentence, a shout, etc.

      5. To grant power or license to; to pe
    2. Giving n.
      1. The act of bestowing as a gift; a conferring or imparting.

      2. A gift; a benefaction. [R.] Pope.

      3. The act of softening, breaking, or yielding. “Upon the first giving of the weather.” Addison.

      Giving in, a falling inwards; a collapse. -- Giving out, anything uttered or asserted; an outgiving.

      His givings out were of an infinite distance

      From his true meant design. Shak.