Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of GO
Meaning of go by Wiktionary Dictionary

GO


    Abbreviation

    GO

    1. Gorontalo, a province of Indonesia .
    2. Goiás, a state of Brazil .

    Anagrams

    • Og

    -go-

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/01/22 05:29 UTC Version )

    接中辞

    -go-

    1. ( pharmacology ) a shortened allomorph of the monoclonal antibody affixes -got- and -gov-, used before the affixes -xi- and -zu- for ease of pronunciation


Explanation of go by Wordnet Dictionary

GO


    Verb
    1. enter or assume a certain state or condition

    2. her face went red with anger
      She went into ecstasy
      Get going!
    3. follow a certain course

    4. The inauguration went well
      how did your interview go?
    5. pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life

    6. The patient went peacefully
    7. be abolished or discarded

    8. These ugly billboards have to go!
      These luxuries all had to go under the Khmer Rouge
    9. stop operating or functioning

    10. The engine finally went
      her eyesight went after the accident
    11. progress by being changed

    12. The speech has to go through several more drafts
    13. give support ( to ) or make a choice ( of ) one out of a group or number

    14. have a turn

    15. Can I go now?
    16. to be spent or finished

    17. The money had gone after a few days
    18. be spent

    19. All my money went for food and rent
    20. go through in search of something

    21. perform as expected when applied

    22. The washing machine won't go unless it's plugged in
    23. change location

    24. How fast does your new car go?
      The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect
    25. move away from a place into another direction

    26. Go away before I start to cry
    27. begin or set in motion

    28. Ready, set, go!
    29. make a certain noise or sound

    30. She went `Mmmmm'
      The gun went `bang'
    31. follow a procedure or take a course

    32. We should go farther in this matter
      She went through a lot of trouble
      go about the world in a certain manner
      Messages must go through diplomatic channels
    33. pass, fare, or elapse

    34. How is it going?
      The day went well until I got your call
    35. be or continue to be in a certain condition

    36. The children went hungry that day
    37. continue to live through hardship or adversity

    38. We went without water and food for 3 days
    39. be awarded

    40. The first prize goes to Mary
      Her money went on clothes
    41. be the right size or shape

    42. stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope

    43. His knowledge doesn't go very far
    44. lead, extend, or afford access

    45. This door goes to the basement
    46. blend or harmonize

    47. This sofa won't go with the chairs
    48. be sounded, played, or expressed

    49. How does this song go again?
    50. be contained in

    51. How many times does 18 go into 54?
    52. have a particular form

    53. as the saying goes...
    54. be ranked or compare

    55. This violinist is as Definition of go by GCIDE Dictionary

      GO


      1. Go ( gō ), obs. p. p. of Go. Gone. Chaucer.

      2. Go, v. i. [imp. Went ( wĕnt ); p. p. Gone ( gŏn; 115 ); p. pr. & vb. n. Going. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See Wend, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. gān, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. gēn, gān, SW. gå, Dan. gaae; cf. Gr. κιχάναι to reach, overtake, Skr. hā to go, AS. gangan, and E. gang. The past tense in AS., eode, is from the root i to go, as is also Goth. iddja went. √47a. Cf. Gang, v. i., Wend.]
        1. To pass from one place to another; to be in motion; to be in a state not motionless or at rest; to proceed; to advance; to make progress; -- used, in various applications, of the movement of both animate and inanimate beings, by whatever means, and also of the movements of the mind; also figuratively applied.

        2. To move upon the feet, or step by step; to walk; also, to walk step by step, or leisurely.

        ☞ In old writers go is much used as opposed to run, or ride. “Whereso I go or ride.” Chaucer.

        You know that love

        Will creep in service where it can not go. Shak.

        Thou must run to him; for thou hast staid so long that going will scarce serve the turn. Shak.

        He fell from running to going, and from going to clambering upon his hands and his knees. Bunyan.

        ☞ In Chaucer go is used frequently with the pronoun in the objective used reflexively; as, he goeth him home.

        3. To be passed on fron one to another; to pass; to circulate; hence, with for, to have currency; to be taken, accepted, or regarded.

        The man went among men for an old man in the days of Saul. 1 Sa. xvii. 12.

        [The money] should go according to its true value. Locke.

        4. To proceed or happen in a given manner; to fare; to move on or be carried on; to have course; to come to an issue or result; to succeed; to turn out.

        How goes the night, boy ? Shak.

        I think, as the world goes, he was a good sort of man enough. Arbuthnot.

        Whether the cause goes for me or against me, you must pay me the reward. I Watts.

        5. To proceed or tend toward a result, consequence, or product; to tend; to conduce; to be an ingredient; to avail; to apply; to contribute; -- often with the infinitive; as, “this goes to show”.

        Against right reason all your counsels go. Dryden.

        To master the foul flend there goeth some complement knowledge of theology. Sir W. Scott.

        6. To apply one's self; to set one's self; to undertake.

        Seeing himself confronted by so many, like a resolute orator, he went not to denial, but to justify his cruel falsehood. Sir P. Sidney.

        ☞ Go, in this sense, is often used in the present participle with the auxiliary verb to be, before an infinitive, to express a future of intention, or to denote design; as, I was going to say; I am going to begin harvest.



        7. To proceed by a mental operation; to pass in mind or by an act of the memory or imagination; -- generally with over or through.

        By going over all these particulars, you may receive some tolerable satisfaction about this great subject. South.

        8. To be with young; to be pregnant; to gestate.

        The fruit she goes with,

        I pray for heartily, that it may find

        Good time, and live. Shak.

        9. To move from the person speaking, or from the point whence the action is contemplated; to pass away; to leave; to depart; -- in opposition to stay and come.

        I will let you go, that ye may sacrifice to the Lord your God; . . . only ye shall not go very far away. Ex. viii. 28.

        10. To pass away; to depart forever; to be lost or ruined; to perish; to decline; to decease; to die.

        By Saint George, he's gone!

        That spear wound hath our master sped. Sir W. Scott.

        11. To reach; to extend; to lead; as, “a line goes across the street; his land goes to the river; this road goes to New York.”

        His amorous expressions go no further than virtue may allow. Dryden.

        12. To have recourse; to resort; as, “to go to law”.

        ☞ Go is used, in combination with many prepositions and adverbs, to denote motion of the kind indicated by the preposition or adverb, in which, and not in the verb, lies the principal force of the expression; as, to go against to go into, to go out, to go aside, to go astray, etc.

        Go to, come; move; go away; -- a phrase of exclamation, serious or ironical. -- To go a-begging, not to be in demand; to be undesired. -- To go about. To set about; to enter upon a scheme of action; to undertake. “They went about to slay him.” Acts ix. 29.

        They never go about . . . to hide or palliate their vices. Swift.

        ( Naut. ) To tack; to turn the head of a ship; to wear. -- To go abraod. To go to a foreign country. To go out of doors. To become public; to be published or disclosed; to be current.

        Then went this saying abroad among the brethren. John xxi. 23.Go, v. i. [imp. Went ( wĕnt ); p. p. Gone ( gŏn; 115 ); p. pr. & vb. n. Going. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See Wend, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. gān, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. gēn, gān, SW. gå, Dan. gaae; cf. Gr. κιχάναι to reach, overtake, Skr. hā to go, AS. gangan, and E. gang. The past tense in AS., eode, is from the root i to go, as is also Goth. iddja went. √47a. Cf. Gang, v. i., Wend.]
        1. To pass from one place to another; to be in motion; to be in a state not motionless or at rest; to proceed; to advance; to make progress; -- used, in various applications, of the movement of both animate and inanimate beings, by whatever means, and also of the movements of the mind; also figuratively applied.

        2. To move upon the feet, or step by step; to walk; also, to walk step by step, or leisurely.

        ☞ In old writers go is much used as opposed to run, or ride. “Whereso I go or ride.” Chaucer.

        You know that love

        Will creep in service where it can not go. Shak.

        Thou must run to him; for thou hast staid so long that going will scarce serve the turn. Shak.

        He fell from running to going, and from going to clambering upon his hands and his knees. Bunyan.

        ☞ In Chaucer go is used frequently with the pronoun in the objective used reflexively; as, he goeth him home.

        3. To be passed on fron one to another; to pass; to circulate; hence, with for, to have currency; to be taken, accepted, or regarded.

        The man went among men for an old man in the days of Saul. 1 Sa. xvii. 12.

        [The money] should go according to its true value. Locke.

        4. To proceed or happen in a given manner; to fare; to move on or be carried on; to have course; to come to an issue or result; to succeed; to turn out.

        How goes the night, boy ? Shak.

        I think, as the world goes, he was a good sort of man enough. Arbuthnot.

        Whether the cause goes for me or against me, you must pay me the reward. I Watts.

        5. To proceed or tend toward a result, consequence, or product; to tend; to conduce; to be an ingredient; to avail; to apply; to contribute; -- often with the infinitive; as, “this goes to show”.

        Against right reason all your counsels go. Dryden.

        To master the foul flend there goeth some complement knowledge of theology. Sir W. Scott.

        6. To apply one's self; to set one's self; to undertake.

        Seeing himself confronted by so many, like a resolute orator, he went not to denial, but to justify his cruel falsehood. Sir P. Sidney.

        ☞ Go, in this sense, is often used in the present participle with the auxiliary verb to be, before an infinitive, to express a future of intention, or to denote design; as, I was going to say; I am going to begin harvest.



        7. To proceed by a mental operation; to pass in mind or by an act of the memory or imagination; -- generally with over or through.

        By going over all these particulars, you may receive some tolerable satisfaction about this great subject. South.

        8. To be with young; to be pregnant; to gestate.

        The fruit she goes with,

        I pray for heartily, that it may find

        Good time, and live. Shak.

        9. To move from the person speaking, or from the point whence the action is contemplated; to pass away; to leave; to depart; -- in opposition to stay and come.

        I will let you go, that ye may sacrifice to the Lord your God; . . . only ye shall not go very far away. Ex. viii. 28.

        10. To pass away; to depart forever; to be lost or ruined; to perish; to decline; to decease; to die.

        By Saint George, he's gone!

        That spear wound hath our master sped. Sir W. Scott.

        11. To reach; to extend; to lead; as, “a line goes across the street; his land goes to the river; this road goes to New York.”

        His amorous expressions go no further than virtue may allow. Dryden.

        12. To have recourse; to resort; as, “to go to law”.

        ☞ Go is used, in combination with many prepositions and adverbs, to denote motion of the kind indicated by the preposition or adverb, in which, and not in the verb, lies the principal force of the expression; as, to go against to go into, to go out, to go aside, to go astray, etc.

        Go to, come; move; go away; -- a phrase of exclamation, serious or ironical. -- To go a-begging, not to be in demand; to be undesired. -- To go about. To set about; to enter upon a scheme of action; to undertake. “They went about to slay him.” Acts ix. 29.

        They never go about . . . to hide or palliate their vices. Swift.

        ( Naut. ) To tack; to turn the head of a ship; to wear. -- To go abraod. To go to a foreign country. To go out of doors. To become public; to be published or disclosed; to be current.

        Then went this saying abroad among the brethren. John xxi. 23.Go, v. i. [imp. Went ( wĕnt ); p. p. Gone ( gŏn; 115 ); p. pr. & vb. n. Going. Went comes from the AS, wendan. See Wend, v. i.] [OE. gan, gon, AS. gān, akin to D. gaan, G. gehn, gehen, OHG. gēn, gān, SW. gå, Dan. gaae; cf. Gr. κιχάναι to reach, overtake, Skr. hā to go, AS. gangan, and E. gang. The past tense in AS., eode, is from the root i to go, as is also Goth. iddja went. √47a. Cf. Gang, v. i., Wend.]
        1. To pass from one place to another; to be in motion; to be in a state not motionless or at rest; to proceed; to advance; to make progress; -- used, in various applications, of the movement of both animate and inanimate beings, by whatever means, and also of the movements of the mind; also figuratively applied.

        2. To move upon the feet, or step by step; to walk
      3. Go , v. t.
        1. To take, as a share in an enterprise; to undertake or become responsible for; to bear a part in.

        They to go equal shares in the booty. L'Estrange.

        2. To bet or wager; as, “I'll go you a shilling”. [Colloq.]

        To go halves, to share with another equally. -- To go it, to behave in a wild manner; to be uproarious; to carry on; also, to proceed; to make progress. [Colloq.] -- To go it alone ( Card Playing ), to play a hand without the assistance of one's partner. -- To go it blind. To act in a rash, reckless, or headlong manner. [Slang] ( Card Playing ) To bet without having examined the cards. -- To go one's way, to set forth; to depart.

      4. Go, n.
        1. Act; working; operation. [Obs.]

        So gracious were the goes of marriage. Marston.

        2. A circumstance or occurrence; an incident. [Slang]

        This is a pretty go. Dickens.

        3. The fashion or mode; as, “quite the go”. [Colloq.]

        4. Noisy merriment; as, “a high go”. [Colloq.]

        5. A glass of spirits. [Slang]

        6. Power of going or doing; energy; vitality; perseverance; push; as, “there is no go in him”. [Colloq.]

        7. ( Cribbage ) That condition in the course of the game when a player can not lay down a card which will not carry the aggregate count above thirty-one.

        8. Something that goes or is successful; a success; as, “he made a go of it”; also, an agreement.

        “Well,” said Fleming, “is it a go?” Bret Harte.

        Great go, Little go, the final and the preliminary examinations for a degree. [Slang, Eng. Univ.] -- No go, a failure; a fiasco. [Slang] Thackeray. -- On the go, moving about; unsettled. [Colloq.]