Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of have
Meaning of have by Wiktionary Dictionary

have


    Etymology

    From Middle English haven, from Old English habban, hafian ( “to have” ), from Proto-Germanic *habjanan ( “to have” ), durative of Proto-Germanic *habjanan ( “to lift, take up” ), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂p- ( “to take, seize, catch” ). Cognate with West Frisian hawwe ( “to have” ), Dutch hebben ( “to have” ), Low German hebben, hewwen ( “to have” ), German haben ( “to have” ), Danish have ( “to have” ), Swedish hava ( “to have” ), Icelandic hafa ( “to have” ), Latin capiō ( “take”, v ), Russian хапать ( khapat', “to seize” ). More at heave .

    Since there is no common Indo-European root for a transitive possessive verb have ( notice that Latin "habeo" is not related to English "have" ), Proto-Indo-European probably lacked the have structure. Instead, the third person forms of be were used, with the possessor in dative case, cf. Latin mihi est / sunt, literally to me is / are. [1]

    Pronunciation

    • ( stressed ) IPA: /hæv/ X-SAMPA: /h{v/
    • ( unstressed ) IPA: /( h )əv/ X-SAMPA: /( h )@v/
    • ( have to ): IPA: /hæf/ X-SAMPA: /h{f/
    • Rhymes: -æv

    Verb

    have ( third-person singular simple present has, or archaic hath present participle having, simple past and past participle had )

    Additional archaic forms are second-person singular present tense hast and second-person singular past tense hadst or haddest .
    1. ( transitive ) To possess, own, hold .
      I have a house and a car .
      Look what I have here — a frog I found on the street!
    2. ( transitive ) To be related in some way to ( with the object identifying the relationship ) .
      I have two sisters .
      The dog down the street has a lax owner .
    3. ( transitive ) To partake of a particular substance ( especially a food or drink ) or action .
      I have breakfast at six o'clock .
      Can I have a look at that?
      I'm going to have some pizza and a beer right now .
    4. ( auxiliary verb, taking a past participle ) Used in forming the perfect aspect and the past perfect aspect .
      I have already eaten today .
      I had already eaten .
    5. ( auxiliary verb, taking a to-infinitive ) must .
      I have to go .
      Note: there's a separate entry for have to .
    6. ( transitive ) To give birth to .
      The couple always wanted to have children .
      My wife is having the baby right now!
    7. ( transitive ) To engage in sexual intercourse with .
      He's always bragging about how many women he's had .
    8. ( transitive with bare infinitive ) To cause to, by a command or request .
      They had me feed their dog while they were out of town .
    9. ( transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement ) To cause to be .
      He had him arrested for trespassing .
      The lecture's ending had the entire audience in tears .
    10. ( transitive with bare infinitive ) To be affected by an occurrence. ( Used in supplying a topic that is not a verb argument. )
      The hospital had several patients contract pneumonia last week .
      I've had three people today tell me my hair looks nice .
    11. ( transitive with adjective or adjective-phrase complement ) To depict as being .
      Their stories differed; he said he'd been at work when the incident occurred, but her statement had him at home that entire evening .
      Anton Rogan, 8, was one of the runners-up in the Tick Tock Box short story competition, not Anton Rogers as we had it. — The Guardian .
    12. Used as interrogative auxiliary verb with a following pronoun to form tag questions. ( For further discussion, see "Usage notes" below )
      We haven't eaten dinner yet, have we?
      Your wife hasn't been reading that nonsense, has she?
      ( UK usage ) He has some money, hasn't he?
    13. ( UK, slang ) To defeat in a fight; take .
      I could have him!
      I'm gonna have you!
    14. ( Ireland ) To be able to speak a language .
      I have no German
    15. To feel or be ( especially painfully ) aware of .
      Dan certainly has arms today, probably from scraping paint off four columns the day before .
    16. To be afflicted with, to suffer from, to experience something negative
      He had a cold last week .
      We had a hard year last year, with the locust swarms and all that .
    17. To trick, to deceive
      Yeah! You had me alright! Between your threatening stance and your armed-to-the-teeth men, I never would've thought that was just a joke .
    18. ( transitive, often with 現在分詞 ) Allow.

    Usage notes

    Interrogative auxiliary verb

    have ...? ( third-person singular has ...?, 三人称単数 negative hasn't ...? or has ... not?, negative for all other persons, singular and plural: haven't ...? or have ... not? ); in each case, the ellipsis stands for a pronoun

    Quotations

    Derived terms

    See also Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take

    See also

    1. ^ Internal Reconstruction in Indo-European: Methods, Results, and Problems

    Statistics



Explanation of have by Wordnet Dictionary

have


    Verb
    1. cause to be born

    2. suffer from

    3. undergo ( as of injuries and illnesses )

    4. cause to move

    5. undergo

    6. cause to do

    7. serve oneself to, or consume regularly

    8. Have another bowl of chicken soup!
    9. have sex with

    10. organize or be responsible for

    11. have, throw, or make a party
    12. go through ( mental or physical states or experiences )

    13. have a feeling
    14. have or possess, either in a concrete or an abstract sense

    15. have ownership or possession of

    16. How many cars does she have?
    17. have left

    18. I have two years left
      I don't have any money left
      They have two more years before they retire
    19. get something

    20. receive willingly something given or offered

    21. The only girl who would have him was the miller's daughter
      I won't have this dog in my house!
    22. achieve a point or goal

    23. have a personal or business relationship with someone

    24. have a postdoc
      have an assistant
      have a lover
    25. have as a feature

    26. be confronted with

    27. What do we have here?
      Now we have a fine mess
    Noun
    1. a person who possesses great material wealth



    Definition of have by GCIDE Dictionary

    have


    1. Have ( hăv ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Had ( hăd ); p. pr. & vb. n. Having. Indic. present, I have, thou hast, he has; we, ye, they have.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben ( imperf. hæfde, p. p. gehæfd ); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben, OFries. hebba, OHG. habēn, G. haben, Icel. hafa, Sw. hafva, Dan. have, Goth. haban, and prob. to L. habere, whence F. avoir. Cf. Able, Avoirdupois, Binnacle, Habit.]
      1. To hold in possession or control; to own; as, “he has a farm”.

      2. To possess, as something which appertains to, is connected with, or affects, one.

      The earth hath bubbles, as the water has. Shak.

      He had a fever late. Keats.

      3. To accept possession of; to take or accept.

      Break thy mind to me in broken English; wilt thou have me? Shak.

      4. To get possession of; to obtain; to get. Shak.

      5. To cause or procure to be; to effect; to exact; to desire; to require.

      I had the church accurately described to me. Sir W. Scott.

      Wouldst thou have me turn traitor also? Ld. Lytton.

      6. To bear, as young; as, “she has just had a child”.

      7. To hold, regard, or esteem.

      Of them shall I be had in honor. 2 Sam. vi. 22.

      8. To cause or force to go; to take. “The stars have us to bed.” Herbert. “Have out all men from me.” 2 Sam. xiii. 9.

      9. To take or hold ( one's self ); to proceed promptly; -- used reflexively, often with ellipsis of the pronoun; as, “to have after one; to have at one or at a thing, i. e., to aim at one or at a thing; to attack; to have with a companion.” Shak.

      10. To be under necessity or obligation; to be compelled; followed by an infinitive.

      Science has, and will long have, to be a divider and a separatist. M. Arnold.

      The laws of philology have to be established by external comparison and induction. Earle.

      11. To understand.

      You have me, have you not? Shak.

      12. To put in an awkward position; to have the advantage of; as, “that is where he had him”. [Slang]

      ☞ Have, as an auxiliary verb, is used with the past participle to form preterit tenses; as, I have loved; I shall have eaten. Originally it was used only with the participle of transitive verbs, and denoted the possession of the object in the state indicated by the participle; as, I have conquered him, I have or hold him in a conquered state; but it has long since lost this independent significance, and is used with the participles both of transitive and intransitive verbs as a device for expressing past time. Had is used, especially in poetry, for would have or should have.

      Myself for such a face had boldly died. Tennyson.

      To have a care, to take care; to be on one's guard. -- To have ( a man ) out, to engage ( one ) in a duel. -- To have done ( with ). See under Do, v. i. -- To have it out, to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion. -- To have on, to wear. -- To have to do with. See under Do, v. t.

      Syn. -- To possess; to own. See Possess.

    2. Have ( hăv ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Had ( hăd ); p. pr. & vb. n. Having. Indic. present, I have, thou hast, he has; we, ye, they have.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben ( imperf. hæfde, p. p. gehæfd ); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben, OFries. hebba, OHG. habēn, G. haben, Icel. hafa, Sw. hafva, Dan. have, Goth. haban, and prob. to L. habere, whence F. avoir. Cf. Able, Avoirdupois, Binnacle, Habit.]
      1. To hold in possession or control; to own; as, “he has a farm”.

      2. To possess, as something which appertains to, is connected with, or affects, one.

      The earth hath bubbles, as the water has. Shak.

      He had a fever late. Keats.

      3. To accept possession of; to take or accept.

      Break thy mind to me in broken English; wilt thou have me? Shak.

      4. To get possession of; to obtain; to get. Shak.

      5. To cause or procure to be; to effect; to exact; to desire; to require.

      I had the church accurately described to me. Sir W. Scott.

      Wouldst thou have me turn traitor also? Ld. Lytton.

      6. To bear, as young; as, “she has just had a child”.

      7. To hold, regard, or esteem.

      Of them shall I be had in honor. 2 Sam. vi. 22.

      8. To cause or force to go; to take. “The stars have us to bed.” Herbert. “Have out all men from me.” 2 Sam. xiii. 9.

      9. To take or hold ( one's self ); to proceed promptly; -- used reflexively, often with ellipsis of the pronoun; as, “to have after one; to have at one or at a thing, i. e., to aim at one or at a thing; to attack; to have with a companion.” Shak.

      10. To be under necessity or obligation; to be compelled; followed by an infinitive.

      Science has, and will long have, to be a divider and a separatist. M. Arnold.

      The laws of philology have to be established by external comparison and induction. Earle.

      11. To understand.

      You have me, have you not? Shak.

      12. To put in an awkward position; to have the advantage of; as, “that is where he had him”. [Slang]

      ☞ Have, as an auxiliary verb, is used with the past participle to form preterit tenses; as, I have loved; I shall have eaten. Originally it was used only with the participle of transitive verbs, and denoted the possession of the object in the state indicated by the participle; as, I have conquered him, I have or hold him in a conquered state; but it has long since lost this independent significance, and is used with the participles both of transitive and intransitive verbs as a device for expressing past time. Had is used, especially in poetry, for would have or should have.

      Myself for such a face had boldly died. Tennyson.

      To have a care, to take care; to be on one's guard. -- To have ( a man ) out, to engage ( one ) in a duel. -- To have done ( with ). See under Do, v. i. -- To have it out, to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion. -- To have on, to wear. -- To have to do with. See under Do, v. t.

      Syn. -- To possess; to own. See Possess.

    3. Have ( hăv ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Had ( hăd ); p. pr. & vb. n. Having. Indic. present, I have, thou hast, he has; we, ye, they have.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben ( imperf. hæfde, p. p. gehæfd ); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben, OFries. hebba, OHG. habēn, G. haben, Icel. hafa, Sw. hafva, Dan. have, Goth. haban, and prob. to L. habere, whence F. avoir. Cf. Able, Avoirdupois, Binnacle, Habit.]
      1. To hold in possession or control; to own; as, “he has a farm”.

      2. To possess, as something which appertains to, is connected with, or affects, one.

      The earth hath bubbles, as the water has. Shak.

      He had a fever late. Keats.

      3. To accept possession of; to take or accept.

      Break thy mind to me in broken English; wilt thou have me? Shak.

      4. To get possession of; to obtain; to get. Shak.

      5. To cause or procure to be; to effect; to exact; to desire; to require.

      I had the church accurately described to me. Sir W. Scott.

      Wouldst thou have me turn traitor also? Ld. Lytton.

      6. To bear, as young; as, “she has just had a child”.

      7. To hold, regard, or esteem.

      Of them shall I be had in honor. 2 Sam. vi. 22.

      8. To cause or force to go; to take. “The stars have us to bed.” Herbert. “Have out all men from me.” 2 Sam. xiii. 9.

      9. To take or hold ( one's self ); to proceed promptly; -- used reflexively, often with ellipsis of the pronoun; as, “to have after one; to have at one or at a thing, i. e., to aim at one or at a thing; to attack; to have with a companion.” Shak.

      10. To be under necessity or obligation; to be compelled; followed by an infinitive.

      Science has, and will long have, to be a divider and a separatist. M. Arnold.

      The laws of philology have to be established by external comparison and induction. Earle.

      11. To understand.

      You have me, have you not? Shak.

      12. To put in an awkward position; to have the advantage of; as, “that is where he had him”. [Slang]

      ☞ Have, as an auxiliary verb, is used with the past participle to form preterit tenses; as, I have loved; I shall have eaten. Originally it was used only with the participle of transitive verbs, and denoted the possession of the object in the state indicated by the participle; as, I have conquered him, I have or hold him in a conquered state; but it has long since lost this independent significance, and is used with the participles both of transitive and intransitive verbs as a device for expressing past time. Had is used, especially in poetry, for would have or should have.

      Myself for such a face had boldly died. Tennyson.

      To have a care, to take care; to be on one's guard. -- To have ( a man ) out, to engage ( one ) in a duel. -- To have done ( with ). See under Do, v. i. -- To have it out, to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion. -- To have on, to wear. -- To have to do with. See under Do, v. t.

      Syn. -- To possess; to own. See Possess.