Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of hit
Meaning of hit by Wiktionary Dictionary

hit


    Pronunciation

    • enPR: hĭt, IPA: /hɪt/, X-SAMPA: /hIt/
    • Rhymes: -ɪt

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English hitten ( “to hit, strike, make contact with” ), from Old English hittan ( “to meet with, come upon, fall in with” ), probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse hitta ( “to strike, meet” ), from Proto-Germanic *hitjanan ( “to come upon, find” ), from Proto-Indo-European *k( ' )eid- ( “to fall, fall upon” ). Cognate with Icelandic hitta ( “to meet” ), Danish hitte ( “to find” ), Latin caedō ( “fall” ) .

    Verb

    hit ( third-person singular simple present hits present participle hitting, simple past and past participle hit )

    1. ( transitive ) To administer a blow to .
      One boy hit the other .
    2. ( transitive ) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly .
      The ball hit the fence .
    3. ( transitive, colloquial ) To briefly visit .
      We hit the grocery store on the way to the park .
    4. ( transitive, informal ) To encounter .
      We hit a lot of traffic coming back from the movies .
      You'll hit some nasty thunderstorms if you descend too late .
    5. ( transitive, informal ) To reach or achieve .
      We hit Detroit at one in the morning but kept driving through the night .
      The temperature could hit 110° F tomorrow .
      The movie hits theaters in December .
      I hit the jackpot .
    6. ( transitive ) To affect negatively .
      The economy was hit by a recession .
      The hurricane hit his fishing business hard .
    7. ( transitive, slang ) To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party .
      Hit him tonight and throw the body in the river .
    8. ( transitive, card games ) In blackjack, to deal a card to .
      Hit me .
    9. ( intransitive, baseball ) To come up to bat .
      Jones hit for the pitcher .
    10. ( transitive, computing, programming ) To use .
      The external web servers hit DBSRV7, the internal web server hits DBSRV3 .
    11. ( transitive, US, slang ) To have sex with .
      I'd hit that .
    Antonyms
    Derived terms

    Noun

    hit ( plural: hits )

    1. A blow; a punch .
      The hit was very slight .
    2. A success, especially in the entertainment industry .
      The band played their hit song to the delight of the fans .
    3. An attack on a location, person or people .
    4. ( computing ) ( Internet ) The result( s ) of a search of a computer system or, for example, the entire Internet using a search engine
    5. ( Internet ) A measured visit to a web site, a request for a single file from a web server .
      My site received twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine .
    6. An approximately correct answer in a test set .
    7. ( baseball ) The complete play, when the batter reaches base without the benefit of a walk, error, or fielder’s choice .
      The catcher got a hit to lead off the fifth .
    8. ( colloquial ) A dose of an illegal or addictive drug .
      Where am I going to get my next hit?
    9. A premeditated murder done for criminal or political purposes .
    10. In the game of Battleship, a correct guess where one's opponent ship is .
    Antonyms
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English hit ( “it” ), from Old English hit ( “it” ), from Proto-Germanic *hit ( “this, this one” ), from Proto-Indo-European *k'e-, *k'ey- ( “this, here” ). Cognate with Dutch het ( “it” ). More at it. Note 'it .

    Pronoun

    hit ( subjective and objective hit, reflexive and intensive hitself, possessive adjective and noun hits )

    1. ( dialectal ) It.
    Derived terms

    Anagrams

    Etymology

    From Proto-Germanic *hit ( “this, this one” ), from Proto-Indo-European *k'e-, *k'ey- ( “this, here” ). Cognate with Old Frisian hit ( “it” ), Old High German iz ( “it” ), Gothic �������� ( hita, “it” ). More at hē .

    Pronoun

    hit n. ( accusative hit, genitive his, dative him )

    1. it

    Descendants



Explanation of hit by Wordnet Dictionary

hit


    Verb
    1. pay unsolicited and usually unwanted sexual attention to

    2. He tries to hit on women in bars
    3. gain points in a game

    4. He hit a home run
      He hit .300 in the past season
    5. make a strategic, offensive, assault against an enemy, opponent, or a target

    6. hit with a missile from a weapon

    7. hit the intended target or goal

    8. consume to excess

    9. hit the bottle
    10. affect or afflict suddenly, usually adversely

    11. We were hit by really bad weather
    12. produce by manipulating keys or strings of musical instruments, also metaphorically

    13. hit against

    14. The car hit a tree
    15. deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument

    16. He hit her hard in the face
    17. cause to move by striking

    18. hit a ball
    19. reach a point in time, or a certain state or level

    20. The thermometer hit 100 degrees
    21. reach a destination, either real or abstract

    22. We hit Detroit by noon
      I have to hit the MAC machine before the weekend starts
    23. drive something violently into a location

    24. he hit his fist on the table
    25. cause to experience suddenly

    26. An interesting idea hit her
    27. encounter by chance

    28. kill intentionally and with premeditation

    Noun
    1. a successful stroke in an athletic contest ( especially in baseball )

    2. he came all the way around on Williams' hit
    3. a conspicuous success

    4. that song was his first hit and marked the beginning of his career
    5. the act of contacting one thing with another

    6. repeated hitting raised a large bruise
      after three misses she finally got a hit
    7. a connection made via the internet to another website

    8. WordNet gets many hits from users worldwide
    9. a murder carried out by an underworld syndicate

    10. it has all the earmarks of a Mafia hit
    11. a dose of a narcotic drug

    12. a brief event in which two or more bodies come together



    Definition of hit by GCIDE Dictionary

    hit


    1. Hit pron. It. [Obs.] Chaucer.

    2. Hit, 3d pers. sing. pres. of Hide, contracted from hideth. [Obs.] Chaucer.

    3. Hit v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hit; p. pr. & vb. n. Hitting.] [OE. hitten, hutten, of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. hitte to hit, find, Sw. & Icel. hitta.]
      1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to reach or touch ( an object aimed at ).

      I think you have hit the mark. Shak.

      2. To reach or attain exactly; to meet according to the occasion; to perform successfully; to attain to; to accord with; to be conformable to; to suit.

      Birds learning tunes, and their endeavors to hit the notes right. Locke.

      There you hit him; . . . that argument never fails with him. Dryden.

      Whose saintly visage is too bright

      To hit the sense of human sight. Milton.

      He scarcely hit my humor. Tennyson.

      3. To guess; to light upon or discover. “Thou hast hit it.” Shak.

      4. ( Backgammon ) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; -- said of a single unprotected piece on a point.

      To hit off, to describe with quick characteristic strokes; as, to hit off a speaker. Sir W. Temple. -- To hit out, to perform by good luck. [Obs.] Spenser.

    4. Hit v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hit; p. pr. & vb. n. Hitting.] [OE. hitten, hutten, of Scand. origin; cf. Dan. hitte to hit, find, Sw. & Icel. hitta.]
      1. To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to reach or touch ( an object aimed at ).

      I think you have hit the mark. Shak.

      2. To reach or attain exactly; to meet according to the occasion; to perform successfully; to attain to; to accord with; to be conformable to; to suit.

      Birds learning tunes, and their endeavors to hit the notes right. Locke.

      There you hit him; . . . that argument never fails with him. Dryden.

      Whose saintly visage is too bright

      To hit the sense of human sight. Milton.

      He scarcely hit my humor. Tennyson.

      3. To guess; to light upon or discover. “Thou hast hit it.” Shak.

      4. ( Backgammon ) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; -- said of a single unprotected piece on a point.

      To hit off, to describe with quick characteristic strokes; as, to hit off a speaker. Sir W. Temple. -- To hit out, to perform by good luck. [Obs.] Spenser.

    5. Hit v. i.
      1. To meet or come in contact; to strike; to clash; -- followed by against or on.

      If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another? Locke.

      Corpuscles, meeting with or hitting on those bodies, become conjoined with them. Woodward.

      2. To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, -- often with implied chance, or luck.

      And oft it hits

      Where hope is coldest and despair most fits. Shak.

      And millions miss for one that hits. Swift.

      To hit on or To hit upon, to light upon; to come to by chance; to discover unexpectedly; as, “he hit on the solution after days of trying”. “None of them hit upon the art.” Addison.

    6. Hit, n.
      1. A striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.

      So he the famed Cilician fencer praised,

      And, at each hit, with wonder seems amazed. Dryden.

      2. A stroke of success in an enterprise, as by a fortunate chance; as, “he made a hit”; esp. A performance, as a musical recording, movie, or play, which achieved great popularity or acclaim; also used of books or objects of commerce which become big sellers; as, “the new notebook computer was a big hit with business travellers”.

      What late he called a blessing, now was wit,

      And God's good providence, a lucky hit. Pope.

      3. A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark; as, “a happy hit”.

      4. A game won at backgammon after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts less than a gammon.

      5. ( Baseball ) A striking of the ball; as, “a safe hit; a foul hit”; -- sometimes used specifically for a base hit.

      6. An act of murder performed for hire, esp. by a professional assassin.

      Base hit, Safe hit, Sacrifice hit. ( Baseball ) See under Base, Safe, etc.