Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of i-
Meaning of i- by Wiktionary Dictionary

i-


    Preposition

    i-

    1. ( obsolete ) Used to form past participles of verbs. Alternative spelling of y- .

    Etymology 2

    From Latin in- ( “not” ) .

    Preposition

    i-

    1. A form of the prefix in-, used before gn, as in ignoble, ignominy, and ignore .

    Preposition

    i-

    1. ( Jamaica, Iyaric ) Used to transform English words into words used by Rastafarians with a special meaning .

    See also

    • Rastafarian on Wikipedia .
    • Rastafarian I words on Wikipedia .

    Etymology 4

    Popularized in the name of the iMac line of computers ( 1998 ) .

    Preposition

    i-

    1. Alluding to cutting-edge or fashionable digital devices and computer programs, especially those from Apple.
      • 1999, Melissa August, “Ad Infinitum”, in Time, v 154, November 1, p 39:
        I-WHAT?! Seems everyone's ripping off the iMac idea. Take this parody ad for the fruity-colored “iBrator” at sleeplessknights.com .

    -i

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/07/06 09:26 UTC Version )

    Etymology 1

    From Latin -ī, the plural ending of the Latin second declension, whence the plural of Italian nouns in -o and -e .

    Suffix

    -i

    1. used to indicate a plural form of some words of Latin or Italian origin, such as virtuosi or concerti

    See also

    • OED, s.v. "-i, suffix1" .

    Etymology 2

    From the Arabic nisba suffix ـي ( -iyy ). In English productive from the 19th century .

    Suffix

    -i

    1. Used to form adjectives and nouns describing people of a particular city, region, or country, and the language spoken by these people .
      Iraq → Iraqi, Israel → Israeli, Pakistan → Pakistani, Bengal → Bengali, Nepal → Nepali, Desh → Desi, Hyderabad → Hyderabadi

    See also

    • OED, s.v. "-i, suffix2" .

    -i-

    By Wiktionary ( 2011/07/31 09:05 UTC Version )

    Etymology 1

    From Latin .

    接合辞

    -i-

    1. ( in coining neologisms ) A vowel inserted interconsonantally betwixt morphemes of Latinate origin in order to ease pronunciation ( an anaptyxis, a linking vowel ) .
    Derived terms
    See also

    See also

    • The Concise Oxford English Dictionary [Eleventh Edition] lists -i- as an entry .

    Etymology 2

    The initial vowel of primate

    接辞

    -i-

    1. ( pharmacology ) a monoclonal antibody derived from a non-human primate source
    Related terms
    References
    • USP Dictionary of USAN and International Drug Names, U.S. Pharmacopeia, 2000

    I

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/08/15 14:17 UTC Version )

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /aɪ/, X-SAMPA: /aI/
    • ( Southern US English ): IPA: /ɑː/
    • Rhymes: -aɪ
    • Homophone: eye, aye, ay

    Etymology 1

    • Old French i, from Latin ī, from Etruscan I ( i ) .

    文字

    I uppercase ( lowercase i )

    1. The ninth letter of the English alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script .
    See also
    • ( Latin script letters ) letter; Aa,‎ Bb,‎ Cc,‎ Dd,‎ Ee,‎ Ff,‎ Gg,‎ Hh,‎ Ii,‎ Jj,‎ Kk,‎ Ll,‎ Mm,‎ Nn,‎ Oo,‎ Pp,‎ Qq,‎ Rr,‎ Ss,‎ Tt,‎ Uu,‎ Vv,‎ Ww,‎ Xx,‎ Yy,‎ Zz

    I upper case ( lower case i )

    1. The ordinal number ninth, derived from this letter of the English alphabet, called i and written in the Latin script .

    Etymology 2

    Abbreviation .

    Abbreviation

    I

    1. ( US, roadway ) interstate

    Etymology 3

    From Middle English I, ik ( also ich ), from Old English ih, ic ( “I” ), from Proto-Germanic *ik, *ek ( “I” ), from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂ ( “I” ). Cognate with Scots I, ik, A ( “I” ), West Frisian ik ( “I” ), Dutch ik ( “I” ), Low German ik ( “I” ), German ich ( “I” ), Bavarian I ( “I” ), Danish jeg ( “I” ), Swedish jag ( “I” ), Icelandic ég, eg ( “I” ), Latin ego ( “I” ), Ancient Greek ἐγώ ( ego ), Russian я ( ja, “I” ), Lithuanian aš ( “I” ). See also ich .

    Pronoun

    I first person singular subject personal pronoun ( objective me, possessive my, possessive pronoun mine, reflexive myself )

    1. The speaker or writer, referred to as the grammatical subject, of a sentence.
    InflectionsubjectIobjectmereflexivemyselfpossessivemypossessive pronounmine
    Synonyms
    See also

    Noun

    I ( uncountable )

    1. ( metaphysics ) The ego .

    See also

    • “I” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000 .
    • “I” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006 .
    • "I" in WordNet 3.0, Princeton University, 2006 .

    Statistics


    i'

    By Wiktionary ( 2010/12/31 19:44 UTC Version )

    短縮形

    i'

    1. ( colloquial, poetic ) in
    2. ( colloquial, poetic ) it



Definition of i- by GCIDE Dictionary

i-


  1. I- prefix. See Y-.

  2. Y- or I- . [OE. y-, i-, AS. ge-, akin to D. & G. ge-, OHG. gi-, ga-, Goth. ga-, and perhaps to Latin con-; originally meaning, together. Cf. Com-, Aware, Enough, Handiwork, Ywis.] A prefix of obscure meaning, originally used with verbs, adverbs, adjectives, nouns, and pronouns. In the Middle English period, it was little employed except with verbs, being chiefly used with past participles, though occasionally with the infinitive. Ycleped, or yclept, is perhaps the only word not entirely obsolete which shows this use.

    That no wight mighte it see neither yheere. Chaucer.

    Neither to ben yburied nor ybrent. Chaucer.

    ☞ Some examples of Chaucer's use of this prefix are; ibe, ibeen, icaught, ycome, ydo, idoon, ygo, iproved, ywrought. It inough, enough, it is combined with an adjective. Other examples are in the Vocabulary.

    Spenser and later writers frequently employed this prefix when affecting an archaic style, and sometimes used it incorrectly.