Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of Iron
Meaning of iron by Wiktionary Dictionary

Iron


    Etymology 1

    The position of the element iron in the periodic table, and its structure.

    Middle English iren, a rhotacism of Old English īsern, īsærn, īren, īsen, from Proto-Germanic *īsarna ( cf. Dutch ijzer, German Eisen, Danish jern ), from Gaulish isarno, from Proto-Celtic *eisarno ( compare Welsh haearn, Irish iarann ), from Proto-Indo-European *ésh₂r̥ 'blood' ( compare Hittite ēshar, gen. ēs( h )nas, Old Latin aser, assyr, Tocharian A ysār/yasar, Latvian asino, Ancient Greek éas, Armenian ariwn, Sanskrit ásṛk, gen. asnás ).[1][2] The sense development runs from 'blood' to 'blood red' to 'ruddy metal' .

    Pronunciation

    Chemical elementFePrevious: manganese ( Mn )Next: cobalt ( Co )

    Metathesized or syncopated from original IPA: /ˈaɪrən/ .

    • ( UK, RP ) IPA: /ˈaɪən/, SAMPA: /"aI@n/
    • ( US ) IPA: /ˈaɪɚn/, SAMPA: /"aI@`n/
    • Rhymes: -aɪə( r )n

    Noun

    iron ( countable and uncountable; plural: irons )

    An electric clothes iron.
    1. ( uncountable, chemistry ) A metallic chemical element having atomic number 26, and symbol Fe .
    2. ( countable ) A tool or appliance made of metal, which is heated and then used to transfer heat to something else; most often a thick piece of metal fitted with a handle and having a flat, roughly triangular bottom, which is heated and used to press wrinkles from clothing, and now usually containing an electrical heating apparatus .
    3. ( usually plural:, irons ) shackles .
    4. ( slang ) A handgun .
    5. ( uncountable ) A dark shade of the colour/color silver .
    6. ( Cockney rhyming slang, shortened from iron hoof, rhyming with poof; countable, offensive ) A male homosexual .
    7. ( golf ) A golf club used for middle-distance shots .
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    See also

    1. ^ Donald A. Ringe, From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic ( Oxford: Oxford, 2006 ), 296 .
    2. ^ J.P. Mallory and Donald Q. Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, s.v. "blood" ( London: Fitzroy Dearborn, 1999 ) .

    Pronunciation

    • ( UK, RP ) IPA: /ˈaɪən/, SAMPA: /"aI@n/
    • ( US ) IPA: /ˈaɪɚn/, SAMPA: /"aI@`n/
    • Rhymes: -aɪən

    Adjective

    iron ( comparative more iron, superlative most iron )

    1. ( not comparable ) Made of the metal iron .
    2. ( figuratively ) Strong ( as of will ), inflexible .
      She had an iron will .
      He held on with an iron grip .
    Synonyms
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    Etymology 3

    An extension of Etymology 1 .

    Pronunciation

    • ( UK, RP ) IPA: /ˈaɪən/, SAMPA: /"aI@n/
    • ( US ) IPA: /ˈaɪɚn/, SAMPA: /"aI@`n/
    • Rhymes: -aɪən

    Verb

    to iron ( third-person singular simple present irons present participle ironing, simple past and past participle ironed )

    1. ( transitive ) To pass an iron over ( clothing or some other item made of cloth ) in order to remove creases .
    Synonyms
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    Descendants
    • Japanese: airon
    Derived terms

    Anagrams

    • inro, inrō
    • noir
    • nori
    • Orin
    • RINO


Explanation of iron by Wordnet Dictionary

Iron


    Verb
    1. press and smooth with a heated iron

    2. she stood there ironing
    Adjective
    1. extremely robust

    2. an iron constitution
    Noun
    1. home appliance consisting of a flat metal base that is heated and used to smooth cloth

    2. a golf club that has a relatively narrow metal head

    3. implement used to brand live stock

    4. a heavy ductile magnetic metallic element



    Definition of iron by GCIDE Dictionary

    Iron


    1. Iron ( īŭrn ), n. [OE. iren, AS. īren, īsen, īsern; akin to D. ijzer, OS. īsarn, OHG. īsarn, īsan, G. eisen, Icel. īsarn, jārn, Sw. & Dan. jern, and perh. to E. ice; cf. Ir. iarann, W. haiarn, Armor. houarn.]

      1. ( Chem. ) The most common and most useful metallic element, being of almost universal occurrence, usually in the form of an oxide ( as hematite, magnetite, etc. ), or a hydrous oxide ( as limonite, turgite, etc. ). It is reduced on an enormous scale in three principal forms; viz., cast iron, steel, and wrought iron. Iron usually appears dark brown, from oxidation or impurity, but when pure, or on a fresh surface, is a gray or white metal. It is easily oxidized ( rusted ) by moisture, and is attacked by many corrosive agents. Symbol Fe ( Latin Ferrum ). Atomic number 26, atomic weight 55.847. Specific gravity, pure iron, 7.86; cast iron, 7.1. In magnetic properties, it is superior to all other substances.

      ☞ The value of iron is largely due to the facility with which it can be worked. Thus, when heated it is malleable and ductile, and can be easily welded and forged at a high temperature. As cast iron, it is easily fusible; as steel, is very tough, and ( when tempered ) very hard and elastic. Chemically, iron is grouped with cobalt and nickel. Steel is a variety of iron containing more carbon than wrought iron, but less that cast iron. It is made either from wrought iron, by roasting in a packing of carbon ( cementation ) or from cast iron, by burning off the impurities in a Bessemer converter ( then called Bessemer steel ), or directly from the iron ore ( as in the Siemens rotatory and generating furnace ).

      2. An instrument or utensil made of iron; -- chiefly in composition; as, “a flatiron, a smoothing iron, etc.”

      My young soldier, put up your iron. Shak.

      3. pl. Fetters; chains; handcuffs; manacles.

      Four of the sufferers were left to rot in irons. Macaulay.

      4. Strength; power; firmness; inflexibility; as, “to rule with a rod of iron”.

      5. ( Golf ) An iron-headed club with a deep face, chiefly used in making approaches, lifting a ball over hazards, etc.

      Bar iron. See Wrought iron ( below ). -- Bog iron, bog ore; limonite. See Bog ore, under Bog. -- Cast iron ( Metal. ), an impure variety of iron, containing from three to six percent of carbon, part of which is united with a part of the iron, as a carbide, and the rest is uncombined, as graphite. It there is little free carbon, the product is white iron; if much of the carbon has separated as graphite, it is called gray iron. See also Cast iron, in the Vocabulary. -- Fire irons. See under Fire, n. -- Gray irons. See under Fire, n. -- Gray iron. See Cast iron ( above ). -- It irons ( Naut. ), said of a sailing vessel, when, in tacking, she comes up head to the wind and will not fill away on either tack. -- Magnetic iron. See Magnetite. -- Malleable iron ( Metal. ), iron sufficiently pure or soft to be capable of extension under the hammer; also, specif., a kind of iron produced by removing a portion of the carbon or other impurities from cast iron, rendering it less brittle, and to some extent malleable. --
      Meteoric iron ( Chem. ), iron forming a large, and often the chief, ingredient of meteorites. It invariably contains a small amount of nickel and cobalt. Cf. Meteorite. -- Pig iron, the form in which cast iron is made at the blast furnace, being run into molds, called pigs. -- Reduced iron. See under Reduced. -- Specular iron. See Hematite. -- Too many irons in the fire, too many objects or tasks requiring the attention at once. -- White iron. See Cast iron ( above ). -- Wrought iron ( Metal. ), the purest form of iron commonly known in the arts, containing only about half of one per cent of carbon. It is made either directly from the ore, as in the Catalan forge or bloomery, or by purifying ( puddling ) cast iron in a reverberatory furnace or refinery. It is tough, malleable, and ductile. When formed into bars, it is called bar iron.

    2. Iron ( īŭrn ), a. [AS. īren, īsen. See Iron, n.]

      1. Of, or made of iron; consisting of iron; as, “an iron bar, dust”.

      2. Resembling iron in color; as, “iron blackness”.

      3. Like iron in hardness, strength, impenetrability, power of endurance, insensibility, etc.; as:

      Rude; hard; harsh; severe.

      Iron years of wars and dangers. Rowe.

      Jove crushed the nations with an iron rod. Pope.

      Firm; robust; enduring; as, “an iron constitution”.

      Inflexible; unrelenting; as, “an iron will”.

      Not to be broken; holding or binding fast; tenacious. “Him death's iron sleep oppressed.” Philips.

      ☞ Iron is often used in composition, denoting made of iron, relating to iron, of or with iron; producing iron, etc.; resembling iron, literally or figuratively, in some of its properties or characteristics; as, iron-shod, iron-sheathed, iron-fisted, iron-framed, iron-handed, iron-hearted, iron foundry or iron-foundry.

      Iron age. ( Myth. ) The age following the golden, silver, and bronze ages, and characterized by a general degeneration of talent and virtue, and of literary excellence. In Roman literature the Iron Age is commonly regarded as beginning after the taking of Rome by the Goths, A. D. 410. ( Archæol. ) That stage in the development of any people characterized by the use of iron implements in the place of the more cumbrous stone and bronze. -- Iron cement, a cement for joints, composed of cast-iron borings or filings, sal ammoniac, etc. -- Iron clay ( Min. ), a yellowish clay containing a large proportion of an ore of iron. -- Iron cross, a German, and before that Prussian, order of military merit; also, the decoration of the order. -- Iron crown, a golden crown set with jewels, belonging originally to the Lombard kings, and indicating the dominion of Italy. It was so called from containing a circle said to have been forged from one of the nails in the cross of Christ. -- Iron flint ( Min. ), an opaque, flintlike,
    3. Iron, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Ironed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Ironing.]

      1. To smooth with an instrument of iron; especially, to smooth, as cloth, with a heated flatiron; -- sometimes used with out.

      2. To shackle with irons; to fetter or handcuff. “Ironed like a malefactor.” Sir W. Scott.

      3. To furnish or arm with iron; as, “to iron a wagon”.

      iron out differences resolve differences; settle a dispute.

    4. Irony a. [From Iron.]

      1. Made or consisting of iron; partaking of iron; iron; as, “irony chains; irony particles”; -- In this sense iron is the more common term. [R.] Woodward.

      2. Resembling iron in taste, hardness, or other physical property.