Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of made
Meaning of made by Wiktionary Dictionary

made


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /meɪ̯d/, SAMPA: /meId/
    • Rhymes: -eɪd
    • Homophone: maid

    Verb

    made

    1. Simple past tense and past participle of make .

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Explanation of made by Wordnet Dictionary

made


    Adjective
    1. produced by a manufacturing process

    2. bought some made goods at the local store; rope and nails
    3. ( of a bed ) having the sheets and blankets set in order

    4. a neatly made bed
    5. successful or assured of success

    6. now I am a made man forever- Christopher Marlowe


    Definition of made by GCIDE Dictionary

    made


    1. Mad, n. [AS. maa; akin to D. & G. made, Goth. mapa, and prob. to E. moth.] ( Zool. ) An earthworm. [Written also made.]

    2. Made n. ( Zool. ) See Mad, n.

    3. Made imp. & p. p. of Make.

    4. Made, a. Artificially produced; pieced together; formed by filling in; as, “made ground; a made mast, in distinction from one consisting of a single spar.” [wns=1]

      2. having the sheets and blankets set in order; -- of a bed; as, “is the bed made?”.

      3. successful or assured of success; as, “a self-made man”.

      Now I am a made man forever. Christopher Marlowe

      Made up. Complete; perfect. “A made up villain.” Shak. Falsely devised; fabricated; as, “a made up story”. Artificial; as, “a made up figure or complexion”.

    5. make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. made ( mād ); p. pr. & vb. n. making.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. makn, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahhn to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. Match an equal.]
      1. To cause to exist; to bring into being; to form; to produce; to frame; to fashion; to create. Hence, in various specific uses or applications: To form of materials; to cause to exist in a certain form; to construct; to fabricate.

      He . . . fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf. Ex. xxxii. 4.

      To produce, as something artificial, unnatural, or false; -- often with up; as, “to make up a story”.

      And Art, with her contending, doth aspire

      To excel the natural with made delights. Spenser.

      To bring about; to bring forward; to be the cause or agent of; to effect, do, perform, or execute; -- often used with a noun to form a phrase equivalent to the simple verb that corresponds to such noun; as, to make complaint, for to complain; to make record of, for to record; to make abode, for to abide, etc.

      Call for Samson, that he may make us sport. Judg. xvi. 25.

      Wealth maketh many friends. Prov. xix. 4.

      I will neither plead my age nor sickness in excuse of the faults which I have made. Dryden.

      To execute with the requisite formalities; as, to make a bill, note, will, deed, etc. To gain, as the result of one's efforts; to get, as profit; to make acquisition of; to have accrue or happen to one; as, “to make a large profit; to make an error; to make a loss; to make money”.

      He accuseth Neptune unjustly who makes shipwreck a second time. Bacon.

      To find, as the result of calculation or computation; to ascertain by enumeration; to find the number or amount of, by reckoning, weighing, measurement, and the like; as, he made the distance of; to travel over; as, “the ship makes ten knots an hour; he made the distance in one day”. To put in a desired or desirable condition; to cause to thrive.

      Who makes or ruins with a smile or frown. Dryden.

      2. To cause to be or become; to put into a given state verb, or adjective; to constitute; as, “to make known; to make public; to make fast.”

      Who made thee a prince and a judge over us? Ex. ii. 14.

      See, I have made thee a god to Pharaoh. Ex. vii. 1.

      ☞ When used reflexively with an adjective, the reflexive pronoun is often omitted; as, to make merry; to make bold; to make free, etc.

      3. To cause to appear to be; to constitute subjectively; to esteem, suppose, or represent.

      He is not that goose and ass that Valla would make him. Baker.

      4. To require; to constrain; to compel; to force; to cause; to occasion; -- followed by a noun or pronoun and infinitive.

      ☞ In the active voice the to of the infinitive is usually omitted.

      I will make them hear my words. Deut. iv. 10.

      They should be made to rise at their early hour. Locke.

      5. To become; to be, or to be capable of being, changed or fashioned into; to do the part or office of; to furnish the material for; as, “he will make a good musician; sweet cider makes sour vinegar; wool makes warm clothing.”

      And old cloak makes a new jerkin. Shak.

      6. To compose, as parts, ingredients, or materials; to constitute; to form; to amount to; as, “a pound of ham makes a hearty meal”.

      The heaven, the air, the earth, and boundless sea,

      Make but one temple for the Deity. Waller.

      7. To be engaged or concerned in. [Obs.]

      Gomez, what makest thou here, with a whole brotherhood of city bailiffs? Dryden.

      8. To reach; to attain; to arrive at or in sight of. “And make the Libyan shores.” Dryden.

      They that sail in the middle can make no land of either side. Sir T. Browne.

      To make a bed, to prepare a bed for being slept on, or to put it in order. -- To make a card ( Card Playing ), to take a trick with it. -- To make account. See under Account, n. -- To make account of, to esteem; to regard. -- To make away. To put out of the way; to kill; to destroy. [Obs.]

      If a child were crooked or deformed in body or mind, they made him away. Burton.

      To alienate; to transfer; to make over. [Obs.] Waller. -- To make believe, to pretend; to feign; to simulate. -- To make bold, to take the liberty; to venture. -- To make the cards ( Card Playing ), to shuffle the pack. -- To make choice of, to take by way of preference; to choose. -- To make danger, to make experiment. [Obs.] Beau. & Fl. -- To make default ( Law ), to fail to appear or answer. -- To make the doors, to shut the door. [Obs.]

      Make the doors upon a woman's wit, and it will out at the casement. Shak.

      - To make free with. See under Free, a. make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. made ( mād ); p. pr. & vb. n. making.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. makn, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahhn to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. Match an equal.]
      1. To cause to exist; to bring into being; to form; to produce; to frame; to fashion; to create. Hence, in various specific uses or applications: To form of materials; to cause to exist in a certain form; to construct; to fabricate.

      He . . . fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf. Ex. xxxii. 4.

      To produce, as something artificial, unnatural, or false; -- often with up; as, “to make up a story”.

      And Art, with her contending, doth aspire

      To excel the natural with made delights. Spenser.

      To bring about; to bring forward; to be the cause or agent of; to effect, do, perform, or execute; -- often used with a noun to form a phrase equivalent to the simple verb that corresponds to such noun; as, to make complaint, for to complain; to make record of, for to record; to make abode, for to abide, etc.

      Call for Samson, that he may make us sport. Judg. xvi. 25.

      Wealth maketh many friends. Prov. xix. 4.

      I will neither plead my age nor sickness in excuse of the faults which I have made. Dryden.

      To execute with the requisite formalities; as, to make a bill, note, will, deed, etc. To gain, as the result of one's efforts; to get, as profit; to make acquisition of; to have accrue or happen to one; as, “to make a large profit; to make an error; to make a loss; to make money”.

      He accuseth Neptune unjustly who makes shipwreck a second time. Bacon.

      To find, as the result of calculation or computation; to ascertain by enumeration; to find the number or amount of, by reckoning, weighing, measurement, and the like; as, he made the distance of; to travel over; as, “the ship makes ten knots an hour; he made the distance in one day”. To put in a desired or desirable condition; to cause to thrive.

      Who makes or ruins with a smile or frown. Dryden.

      2. To cause to be or become; to put into a given state verb, or adjective; to constitute; as, “to make known; to make public; to make fast.”

      Who made thee a prince and a judge over us? Ex. ii. 14.

      See, I have made thee a god to Pharaoh. Ex. vii. 1.

      ☞ When used reflexively with an adjective, the reflexive pronoun is often omitted; as, to make merry; to make bold; to make free, etc.

      3. To cause to appear to be; to constitute subjectively; to esteem, suppose, or represent.

      He is not that goose and ass that Valla would make him. Baker.

      4. To require; to constrain; to compel; to force; to cause; to occasion; -- followed by a noun or pronoun and infinitive.

      ☞ In the active voice the to of the infinitive is usually omitted.

      I will make them hear my words. Deut. iv. 10.

      They should be made to rise at their early hour. Locke.

      5 .