Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of make
Meaning of make by Wiktionary Dictionary

make


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /meɪk/, X-SAMPA: /meIk/
    • Rhymes: -eɪk

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English maken, from Old English macian ( “to make, build, work” ), from Proto-Germanic *makōnan ( “to make, build, work” ), from Proto-Indo-European *mag- ( “to knead, mix, make” ). Cognate with Dutch maken ( “to make” ), Low German maken ( “to make” ), German machen ( “to make, do” ). Related to match .

    Verb

    make ( third-person singular simple present makes present participle making, simple past and past participle made )

    1. ( intransitive, now mostly colloquial ) To behave, to act .
      To make like a deer caught in the headlights .
      They made nice together, as if their fight never happened .
      He made as if to punch him, but they both laughed and shook hands .
    2. ( transitive ) To create, construct, or produce .
      We made a bird feeder for our yard .
      They hope to make a bigger profit .
      We'll make a man out of him yet .
    3. ( linguistics, transitive ) To form ( e.g. a word out of morphemes, or a sentence out of words ) .
    4. To constitute .
      They make a cute couple .
      This makes the third infraction .
    5. ( construed with of, typically interrogative ) To interpret .
      I don’t know what to make of it .
    6. ( usually stressed ) To bring into success .
      This company is what made you .
      She married into wealth. She has it made .
    7. ( second object is an adjective, participle, or noun ) To cause to be .
      The citizens made their objections clear .
      This might make you a bit woozy .
      Did I make myself heard?
      Scotch will make you a man .
    8. ( second object is a verb ) To cause to do .
      You're making her cry .
      I was made to feel like a criminal .
    9. ( second object is a verb, can be stressed for emphasis or clarity ) To force to do .
      The teacher made the student study .
      Don’t let them make you suffer .
    10. ( of a fact ) To indicate or suggest to be .
      His past mistakes don’t make him a bad person .
    11. ( of a bed ) To cover neatly with bedclothes .
    12. ( slang, of a person being sought ) To recognise ( without being recognised in return ).
    13. ( transitive, colloquial ) To arrive at a destination, usually at or by a certain time .
      We should make Cincinnati by 7 tonight .
    14. ( intransitive, colloquial ) To proceed ( in a direction ) .
      They made westward over the snowy mountains .
      Make for the hills! It's a wildfire!
      They made away from the fire toward the river .
    15. To cover ( a given distance ) by travelling. [from 16th c.]
    16. To move at ( a speed ). [from 17th c.]
      The ship could make 20 knots an hour in calm seas .
      We're lost, but we're making good time so far .
      This baby can make 220 miles an hour .
    17. ( slang ) To induct into the Mafia or a similar organization ( as a made man ).
      • 1990, Nicholas Pileggi & Martin Scorsese, Goodfellas:
        Jimmy Conway: They're gonna make him .
        Henry Hill: Paulie's gonna make you?
    18. ( intransitive, colloquial, euphemistic ) To defecate or urinate.
    19. To earn, to gain ( money ) .
      You have to spend money to make money!
      He made twenty bucks playing poker last night .
      She makes more than he does, and works longer hours than he does, but she still does most of the house-cleaning .
    20. ( transitive ) To pay, to cover ( an expense ); chiefly used after expressions of inability.
    21. This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    Derived terms
    See also
    • Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take

    Noun

    make ( plural: makes )

    1. ( often of a car ) Brand or kind; often paired with model. syn. transl .
      What make of car do you drive?
    2. How a thing is made; construction. syn.
    3. Origin of a manufactured article; manufacture. syn .
      The camera was of German make .
    4. ( uncountable ) Quantity produced, especially of materials. syn.
    5. ( dated ) The act or process of making something, especially in industrial manufacturing. syn.
    6. A person's character or disposition. syn.
    7. ( bridge ) The declaration of the trump for a hand.
    8. ( physics ) The closing of an electrical circuit. syn.
    9. ( computing ) A software utility for automatically building large applications, or an implementation of this utility.
    10. ( slang ) Recognition or identification, especially from police records or evidence. syn.
    11. ( slang, usually in phrase "easy make" ) Past or future target of seduction ( usually female ). syn.
    12. ( slang, military ) A promotion.
    Synonyms

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English make, imake, from Old English ġemaca ( “a mate, an equal, companion, peer” ), from Proto-Germanic *gamakô ( “companion, comrade” ), from Proto-Indo-European *maǵ- ( “to knead, oil” ). Reinforced by Old Norse maki ( “an equal” ). Cognate with Icelandic maki ( “spouse” ), Swedish make ( “spouse, husband” ), Danish mage ( “companion, fellow, mate” ). See also match .

    Noun

    make ( plural: makes )

    1. ( dialectal ) Mate; a spouse or companion.

    Etymology 3

    Origin uncertain .

    Noun

    make ( plural: makes )

    1. ( UK, obsolete ) A halfpenny.

    Statistics

    Anagrams



Explanation of make by Wordnet Dictionary

make


    Verb
    1. act in a certain way so as to acquire

    2. make friends
      make enemies
    3. eliminate urine

    4. have a bowel movement

    5. behave in a certain way

    6. make merry
    7. give certain properties to something

    8. Don't make this into a big deal
      This invention will make you a millionaire
      Make yourself clear
    9. put in order or neaten

    10. make the bed
      make up a room
    11. develop into

    12. He will make a splendid father!
    13. change from one form into another

    14. make water into wine
      make lead into gold
      make clay into bricks
    15. favor the development of

    16. Practice makes the winner
    17. cause to be enjoyable or pleasurable

    18. make my day
    19. institute, enact, or establish

    20. make laws
    21. calculate as being

    22. I make the height about 100 feet
    23. consider as being

    24. make, formulate, or derive in the mind

    25. make an estimate
      What do you make of his remarks?
    26. cause to do

    27. represent fictitiously, as in a play, or pretend to be or act like

    28. She makes like an actress
    29. assure the success of

    30. A good review by this critic will make your play!
    31. induce to have sex

    32. make or cause to be or to become

    33. make a mess in one's office
    34. create or design, often in a certain way

    35. create or manufacture a man-made product

    36. The company has been making toys for two centuries
    37. create by artistic means

    38. give rise to

    39. make a stir
    40. compel or make somebody or something to act in a certain way

    41. Heat makes you sweat
    42. make by shaping or bringing together constituents

    43. make a dress
      make a cake
      make a wall of stones
    44. make by combining materials and parts

    45. prepare for eating by applying heat

    46. can you make me an omelette?
    47. organize or be responsible for

    48. have, throw, or make a party
    49. gather and light the materials for

    50. make a fire
    51. perform or carry out

    52. make a decision
      make a move
      make advances
      make a phone call
    53. reach a destination, either real or abstract

    54. reach in time

    55. reach a goal,

    56. e.g., make the first team
      She may not make the grade
    57. proceed along a path

    58. make one's way into the forest
    59. head into a specified direction

    60. appear to begin an activity

    61. earn on some commercial or business transaction

    62. How much do you make a month in your new job?
    63. achieve a point or goal

    64. charge with a function

    65. engage in

    66. make love, not war
      make an effort
      make revolution
    67. carry out or commit

    68. make a mistake
    69. form by assembling

      Definition of make by GCIDE Dictionary

      make


      1. make ( māk ), n. [AS. maca, gemaca. See Match.] A companion; a mate; often, a husband or a wife. [Obs.]

        For in this world no woman is

        Worthy to be my make. Chaucer.

      2. make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. made ( mād ); p. pr. & vb. n. making.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. makn, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahhn to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. Match an equal.]
        1. To cause to exist; to bring into being; to form; to produce; to frame; to fashion; to create. Hence, in various specific uses or applications: To form of materials; to cause to exist in a certain form; to construct; to fabricate.

        He . . . fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf. Ex. xxxii. 4.

        To produce, as something artificial, unnatural, or false; -- often with up; as, “to make up a story”.

        And Art, with her contending, doth aspire

        To excel the natural with made delights. Spenser.

        To bring about; to bring forward; to be the cause or agent of; to effect, do, perform, or execute; -- often used with a noun to form a phrase equivalent to the simple verb that corresponds to such noun; as, to make complaint, for to complain; to make record of, for to record; to make abode, for to abide, etc.

        Call for Samson, that he may make us sport. Judg. xvi. 25.

        Wealth maketh many friends. Prov. xix. 4.

        I will neither plead my age nor sickness in excuse of the faults which I have made. Dryden.

        To execute with the requisite formalities; as, to make a bill, note, will, deed, etc. To gain, as the result of one's efforts; to get, as profit; to make acquisition of; to have accrue or happen to one; as, “to make a large profit; to make an error; to make a loss; to make money”.

        He accuseth Neptune unjustly who makes shipwreck a second time. Bacon.

        To find, as the result of calculation or computation; to ascertain by enumeration; to find the number or amount of, by reckoning, weighing, measurement, and the like; as, he made the distance of; to travel over; as, “the ship makes ten knots an hour; he made the distance in one day”. To put in a desired or desirable condition; to cause to thrive.

        Who makes or ruins with a smile or frown. Dryden.

        2. To cause to be or become; to put into a given state verb, or adjective; to constitute; as, “to make known; to make public; to make fast.”

        Who made thee a prince and a judge over us? Ex. ii. 14.

        See, I have made thee a god to Pharaoh. Ex. vii. 1.

        ☞ When used reflexively with an adjective, the reflexive pronoun is often omitted; as, to make merry; to make bold; to make free, etc.

        3. To cause to appear to be; to constitute subjectively; to esteem, suppose, or represent.

        He is not that goose and ass that Valla would make him. Baker.

        4. To require; to constrain; to compel; to force; to cause; to occasion; -- followed by a noun or pronoun and infinitive.

        ☞ In the active voice the to of the infinitive is usually omitted.

        I will make them hear my words. Deut. iv. 10.

        They should be made to rise at their early hour. Locke.

        5. To become; to be, or to be capable of being, changed or fashioned into; to do the part or office of; to furnish the material for; as, “he will make a good musician; sweet cider makes sour vinegar; wool makes warm clothing.”

        And old cloak makes a new jerkin. Shak.

        6. To compose, as parts, ingredients, or materials; to constitute; to form; to amount to; as, “a pound of ham makes a hearty meal”.

        The heaven, the air, the earth, and boundless sea,

        Make but one temple for the Deity. Waller.

        7. To be engaged or concerned in. [Obs.]

        Gomez, what makest thou here, with a whole brotherhood of city bailiffs? Dryden.

        8. To reach; to attain; to arrive at or in sight of. “And make the Libyan shores.” Dryden.

        They that sail in the middle can make no land of either side. Sir T. Browne.

        To make a bed, to prepare a bed for being slept on, or to put it in order. -- To make a card ( Card Playing ), to take a trick with it. -- To make account. See under Account, n. -- To make account of, to esteem; to regard. -- To make away. To put out of the way; to kill; to destroy. [Obs.]

        If a child were crooked or deformed in body or mind, they made him away. Burton.

        To alienate; to transfer; to make over. [Obs.] Waller. -- To make believe, to pretend; to feign; to simulate. -- To make bold, to take the liberty; to venture. -- To make the cards ( Card Playing ), to shuffle the pack. -- To make choice of, to take by way of preference; to choose. -- To make danger, to make experiment. [Obs.] Beau. & Fl. -- To make default ( Law ), to fail to appear or answer. -- To make the doors, to shut the door. [Obs.]

        Make the doors upon a woman's wit, and it will out at the casement. Shak.

        - To make free with. See under Free, a. make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. made ( mād ); p. pr. & vb. n. making.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. makn, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahhn to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. Match an equal.]
        1. To cause to exist; to bring into being; to form; to produce; to frame; to fashion; to create. Hence, in various specific uses or applications: To form of materials; to cause to exist in a certain form; to construct; to fabricate.

        He . . . fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf. Ex. xxxii. 4.

        To produce, as something artificial, unnatural, or false; -- often with up; as, “to make up a story”.

        And Art, with her contending, doth aspire

        To excel the natural with made delights. Spenser.

        To bring about; to bring forward; to be the cause or agent of; to effect, do, perform, or execute; -- often used with a noun to form a phrase equivalent to the simple verb that corresponds to such noun; as, to make complaint, for to complain; to make record of, for to record; to make abode, for to abide, etc.

        Call for Samson, that he may make us sport. Judg. xvi. 25.

        Wealth maketh many friends. Prov. xix. 4.

        I will neither plead my age nor sickness in excuse of the faults which I have made. Dryden.

        To execute with the requisite formalities; as, to make a bill, note, will, deed, etc. To gain, as the result of one's efforts; to get, as profit; to make acquisition of; to have accrue or happen to one; as, “to make a large profit; to make an error; to make a loss; to make money”.

        He accuseth Neptune unjustly who makes shipwreck a second time. Bacon.

        To find, as the result of calculation or computation; to ascertain by enumeration; to find the number or amount of, by reckoning, weighing, measurement, and the like; as, he made the distance of; to travel over; as, “the ship makes ten knots an hour; he made the distance in one day”. To put in a desired or desirable condition; to cause to thrive.

        Who makes or ruins with a smile or frown. Dryden.

        2. To cause to be or become; to put into a given state verb, or adjective; to constitute; as, “to make known; to make public; to make fast.”

        Who made thee a prince and a judge over us? Ex. ii. 14.

        See, I have made thee a god to Pharaoh. Ex. vii. 1.

        ☞ When used reflexively with an adjective, the reflexive pronoun is often omitted; as, to make merry; to make bold; to make free, etc.

        3. To cause to appear to be; to constitute subjectively; to esteem, suppose, or represent.

        He is not that goose and ass that Valla would make him. Baker.

        4. To require; to constrain; to compel; to force; to cause; to occasion; -- followed by a noun or pronoun and infinitive.

        ☞ In the active voice the to of the infinitive is usually omitted.

        I will make them hear my words. Deut. iv. 10.

        They should be made to rise at their early hour. Locke.

        5 .
      3. Make ( māk ), v. i.
        1. To act in a certain manner; to have to do; to manage; to interfere; to be active; -- often in the phrase to meddle or make. [Obs.]

        A scurvy, jack-a-nape priest to meddle or make. Shak.

        2. To proceed; to tend; to move; to go; as, “he made toward home; the tiger made at the sportsmen.”

        ☞ Formerly, authors used to make on, to make forth, to make about; but these phrases are obsolete. We now say, to make at, to make away, to make for, to make off, to make toward, etc.

        3. To tend; to contribute; to have effect; -- with for or against; as, “it makes for his advantage”. M. Arnold.

        Follow after the things which make for peace. Rom. xiv. 19.

        Considerations infinite

        Do make against it. Shak.

        4. To increase; to augment; to accrue.

        5. To compose verses; to write poetry; to versify. [Archaic] Chaucer. Tennyson.

        To solace him some time, as I do when I make. P. Plowman.

        To make as if, or To make as though, to pretend that; to make show that; to make believe ( see under Make, v. t. ).

        Joshua and all Israel made as if they were beaten before them, and fled. Josh. viii. 15.

        My lord of London maketh as though he were greatly displeased with me. Latimer.

        -- To make at, to go toward hastily, or in a hostile manner; to attack. -- To make away with. To carry off. To transfer or alienate; hence, to spend; to dissipate. To kill; to destroy. -- To make off, to go away suddenly. -- To make out, to succeed; to manage oneself; to be able at last; to make shift; as, “he made out to reconcile the contending parties; after the earthquake they made out all right”. to engage in fond caresses; to hug and kiss; to neck; -- of courting couples or individuals ( for individuals, used with with ); as, “they made out on a bench in the park; he was making out with the waitress in the kitchen” [informal] -- To make up, to become reconciled or friendly. -- To make up for, to compensate for; to supply an equivalent for. -- To make up to. To approach; as, “a suspicious boat made up to us”. To pay addresses to; to make love to. -- To make up with, to become reconciled to. [Colloq.] -- To make with, to concur or agree with. Hooker.

      4. Make, n. Structure, texture, constitution of parts; construction; shape; form.

        It our perfection of so frail a make

        As every plot can undermine and shake? Dryden.

        On the make, bent upon making great profits; greedy of gain. [Low, U. S.] seeking higher social status or a higher employment position. seeking a sexual partner; looking for sexual adventure.

        [1913 Webster +PJC]