Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of many
Meaning of many by Wiktionary Dictionary

many


    Pronunciation

    • ( UK ) IPA: /ˈmɛnɪ/, X-SAMPA: /"mEnI/
    • ( US ) IPA: /ˈmɛni/, X-SAMPA: /"mEni/
    • Rhymes: -ɛni
    • ( Ireland ) IPA: /ˈmæni/, X-SAMPA: /"m{ni/
    • Rhymes: -æni
    • ( US ) Homophone: mini ( some dialects )
    • Hyphenation: man‧y

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English many, mani, moni, from Old English maniġ, moniġ, maneġ ( “many” ), from Proto-Germanic *managaz ( “some, much, many” ), from Proto-Indo-European *monogʰo- ( “many” ). Cognate with Scots mony ( “many” ), Eastern Frisian manich ( “some, many” ), West Frisian mannich ( “many” ), Dutch menig ( “many” ), Low German männig ( “Many” ), German manch ( “many, some” ) and mannig-, French maint ( “many” ), Russian многий ( mnógij ), Scottish Gaelic minig .

    Determiner

    many ( comparative more, superlative most )

    1. An indefinite large number of .
      Many people enjoy using dictionaries
      There are many different ways to define a word
    Antonyms

    Pronoun

    many

    1. A collective mass of people .
      Democracy must balance the rights of the few against the will of the many
      A great many do not understand this .
    2. An indefinite large number of people or things .
      Many are called, but few are chosen .
    Antonyms
    Derived terms
    Quotations

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English manye, *menye, from Old English manigeo, menigu ( “company, multitude, host” ), from Proto-Germanic *managō, *managīn ( “multitude” ). Cognate with Middle Low German menige, menie, menje ( “multitude” ) .

    Noun

    many ( plural: manies )

    1. A multitude; a great aggregate; a mass of people; the generality; the common herd .
    2. A considerable number .

    Statistics

    Anagrams



Explanation of many by Wordnet Dictionary

many


    Adjective
    1. a quantifier that can be used with count nouns and is often preceded by `as' or `too' or `so' or `that'

    2. many temptations
      the temptations are many
      a good many
      a great many
      many directions
      take as many apples as you like
      too many clouds to see
      never saw so many people


    Definition of many by GCIDE Dictionary

    many


    1. Many n. [See Meine, Mansion.] A retinue of servants; a household. [Obs.] Chaucer.

    2. Many, a. & pron. [It has no variation to express degrees of comparison; more and most, which are used for the comparative and superlative degrees, are from a different root.] [OE. mani, moni, AS. manig, mænig, monig; akin to D. menig, OS. & OHG. manag, G. manch, Dan. mange, Sw. månge, Goth. manags, OSlav. mnog', Russ. mnogii; cf. Icel. margr, Prov. E. mort. √103.] Consisting of a great number; numerous; not few.

      Thou shalt be a father of many nations. Gen. xvii. 4.

      Not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called. 1 Cor. i. 26.

      ☞ Many is freely prefixed to participles, forming compounds which need no special explanation; as, many-angled, many-celled, many-eyed, many-footed, many-handed, many-leaved, many-lettered, many-named, many-peopled, many-petaled, many-seeded, many-syllabled ( polysyllabic ), many-tongued, many-voiced, many-wived, and the like. In such usage it is equivalent to multi.
      Comparison is often expressed by many with as or so. “As many as were willing hearted . . . brought bracelets.” Exod. xxxv. 22. “So many laws argue so many sins.” Milton.
      Many stands with a singular substantive with a or an.

      Many a, a large number taken distributively; each one of many. “For thy sake have I shed many a tear.” Shak. “Full many a gem of purest ray serene.” Gray. -- Many one, many a one; many persons. Bk. of Com. Prayer. -- The many, the majority; -- opposed to the few. See Many, n. -- Too many, too numerous; hence, too powerful; as, “they are too many for us”. L'Estrange.

      Syn. -- Numerous; multiplied; frequent; manifold; various; divers; sundry.

    3. Many, n. [AS. menigeo, menigo, menio, multitude; akin to G. menge, OHG. managī, menigī, Goth. managei. See Many, a.]
      1. The populace; the common people; the majority of people, or of a community.

      After him the rascal many ran. Spenser.

      2. A large or considerable number.

      A many of our bodies shall no doubt

      Find native graves. Shak.

      Seeing a great many in rich gowns. Addison.

      It will be concluded by many that he lived like an honest man. Fielding.

      ☞ In this sense, many is connected immediately with another substantive ( without of ) to show of what the many consists; as, a good many [of] people think so.

      He is liable to a great many inconveniences. Tillotson.