Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of mixed
Meaning of mixed by Wiktionary Dictionary

mixed


    Etymology

    From mix, equivalent to mix +‎ -ed. Compare Middle English mixid ( “mixed”, past participle ), Old English miscode ( “mixed”, preterite ). More at mix .

    Pronunciation

    • Rhymes: -ɪkst

    Verb

    mixed

    1. Simple past tense and past participle of mix .

    Adjective

    mixed ( comparative more mixed, superlative most mixed )

    1. Having two or more separate aspects .
      I get a very mixed feeling from this puzzling painting .
    2. Not completely pure, tainted or adulterated .
      My joy was somewhat mixed when my partner said she was pregnant: it's a lot of responsibility .
    3. Including both male( s ) and female( s ) .
      The tennis match was mixed with a boy and a girl on each side .
      My son attends a mixed school, my daughter an all-girl grammar school .
    4. Stemming from two or more races or breeds
      The benefit dog show has both mixed and single-breed competitions .
      Mixed blood can surprisingly produce inherited properties which neither parent showed

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Explanation of mixed by Wordnet Dictionary

mixed


    Adjective
    1. consisting of a haphazard assortment of different kinds

    2. a mixed program of baroque and contemporary music
    3. involving or composed of different races

    4. a mixed neighborhood


    Definition of mixed by GCIDE Dictionary

    mixed


    1. Mix ( mĭks ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mixed ( mĭkst ) ( less properly Mixt ); p. pr. & vb. n. Mixing.] [AS. miscan; akin to OHG. misken, G. mischen, Russ. mieshate, W. mysgu, Gael. measg, L. miscere, mixtum, Gr. μίσγειν, μιγνύναι, Skr. miçra mixed. The English word has been influenced by L. miscere, mixtum ( cf. Mixture ), and even the AS. miscan may have been borrowed fr. L. miscere. Cf. Admix, Mash to bruise, Meddle.]
      1. To cause a promiscuous interpenetration of the parts of, as of two or more substances with each other, or of one substance with others; to unite or blend into one mass or compound, as by stirring together; to mingle; to blend; as, “to mix flour and salt; to mix wines.”

      Fair persuasions mixed with sugared words. Shak.

      2. To unite with in company; to join; to associate.

      Ephraim, he hath mixed himself among the people. Hos. vii. 8.

      3. To form by mingling; to produce by the stirring together of ingredients; to compound of different parts.

      Hast thou no poison mixed? Shak.

      I have chosen an argument mixed of religious and civil considerations. Bacon.

      4. To combine ( two or more activities ) within a specified or implied time frame; as, “to mix studying and partying while at college”.

    2. Mixed a. Formed by mixing; united; mingled; blended. See Mix, v. t. & i.

      Mixed action ( Law ), a suit combining the properties of a real and a personal action. -- Mixed angle, a mixtilineal angle. -- Mixed fabric, a textile fabric composed of two or more kinds of fiber, as a poplin. -- Mixed marriage, a marriage between persons of different races or religions; specifically, one between a Roman Catholic and a Protestant. -- Mixed number, a whole number and a fraction taken together. -- Mixed train, a railway train containing both passenger and freight cars. -- Mixed voices ( Mus. ), voices of both males and females united in the same performance.