Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of Modern
Meaning of modern by Wiktionary Dictionary

Modern


    Etymology

    From Middle French moderne, from Late Latin modernus; from Latin modo ( “just now” ), originally ablative of modus ( “measure” ); hence, by measure, "just now". See also mode .

    Pronunciation

    • ( RP ) IPA: /ˈmɒd( ə )n/
    • ( GenAm ) IPA: /ˈmɑdɚn/

    Adjective

    modern ( not comparable )

    1. Pertaining to the current time and style .

    Synonyms

    Antonyms

    Derived terms

    Noun

    modern ( plural: moderns )

    1. Someone who lives in modern times.

    See also

    • modern in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
    • “modern” in the Online Etymology Dictionary, Douglas Harper, 2001

    Statistics

    frequency based on Project Gutenberg corpus">Most common English words: direction « o' « eight « #839: modern » medium » ill » eat

    Anagrams



Explanation of modern by Wordnet Dictionary

Modern


    Adjective
    1. characteristic of present-day art and music and literature and architecture

    2. used of a living language

    3. Modern English
    4. relating to a recently developed fashion or style

    5. their offices are in a modern skyscraper
      tables in modernistic designs
    6. belonging to the modern era

    7. modern art
      modern furniture
      modern history
      totem poles are modern rather than prehistoric
    8. ahead of the times

    Noun
    1. a typeface ( based on an 18th century design by Gianbattista Bodoni ) distinguished by regular shape and hairline serifs and heavy downstrokes

    2. a contemporary person



    Definition of modern by GCIDE Dictionary

    Modern


    1. Modern a. [F. moderne, L. modernus; akin to modo just now, orig. abl. of modus measure; hence, by measure, just now. See Mode.]
      1. Of or pertaining to the present time, or time not long past; late; not ancient or remote in past time; of recent period; as, “modern days, ages, or time; modern authors; modern fashions; modern taste; modern practice.” Bacon.

      2. New and common; trite; commonplace. [Obs.]

      We have our philosophical persons, to make modern and familiar, things supernatural and causeless. Shak.

      Modern English. See the Note under English.

    2. Modern, n. A person of modern times; -- opposed to ancient. Pope.