Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of natural
Meaning of natural by Wiktionary Dictionary

natural


    Alternative forms

    Etymology

    Old French, from Latin nātūrālis, from nātus, the perfect participle of nāscor ( “I am born” ) .

    Adjective

    natural ( comparative more natural, superlative most natural )

    1. That exists and evolved within the confines of an ecosystem .
      The species will be under threat if its natural habitat is destroyed .
    2. Of or relating to nature .
      In the natural world the fit tend to live on while the weak perish .
    3. Without artificial additives .
      Natural food is healthier than processed food .
    4. As expected .
      It's natural for business to be slow on Tuesdays .
      The chairs were all natural oak but the table had a lurid finish .
    5. ( music ) Neither sharp nor flat. Denoted ♮ .
      The piece is played in C natural .
    6. Without, or prior to, modification or adjustment .
      So-called second-generation silicone breast implants looked and felt more like the natural breast .
    7. ( of sexual intercourse ) without a condom
      We had a natural fuck .

    Antonyms

    Related terms

    Noun

    natural ( plural: naturals )

    1. ( now rare ) A native inhabitant of a place, country etc. [from 16th c.]
    2. ( music ) A note that is not or is no longer to be modified by an accidental, or the symbolused to indicate such a note. [from 17th c.]
    3. One with an innate talent at or for something. [from 18th c.]
      He's a natural on the saxophone .
    4. An almost white colour, with tints of grey, yellow or brown; originally that of natural fabric. [from 20th c.]
      natural colour:
    5. ( archaic ) One with a simple mind; a fool or idiot.

    See also

    • Appendix:Colors

    Statistics

    External links

    • natural in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
    • natural in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911


Explanation of natural by Wordnet Dictionary

natural


    Adjective
    1. free from artificiality

    2. a natural reaction
    3. being talented through inherited qualities

    4. a natural leader
    5. related by blood

    6. in accordance with nature

    7. a very natural development
      our natural environment
      natural science
      natural resources
      natural cliffs
      natural phenomena
    8. existing in or produced by nature

    9. a natural pearl
      natural gas
      natural silk
      natural blonde hair
      a natural sweetener
      natural fertilizers
    10. existing in or in conformity with nature or the observable world

    11. a perfectly natural explanation
    12. ( of a musical note ) being neither raised nor lowered by one chromatic semitone

    13. a natural scale
      B natural
    14. functioning or occurring in a normal way

    15. it's the natural thing to happen
      natural immunity
      a grandparent's natural affection for a grandchild
    16. ( used especially of commodities ) being unprocessed or manufactured using only simple or minimal processes

    17. natural yogurt
      natural produce
    18. unthinking

    19. a cat's natural aversion to water
    Noun
    1. a first roll of 7 or 11 that immediately wins the stake

    2. a notation cancelling a previous sharp or flat

    3. someone regarded as certain to succeed

    4. he's a natural for the job


    Definition of natural by GCIDE Dictionary

    natural


    1. Natural ( ?; 135 ), a. [OE. naturel, F. naturel, fr. L. naturalis, fr. natura. See Nature.]
      1. Fixed or determined by nature; pertaining to the constitution of a thing; belonging to native character; according to nature; essential; characteristic; innate; not artificial, foreign, assumed, put on, or acquired; as, “the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color.”

      With strong natural sense, and rare force of will. Macaulay.

      2. Conformed to the order, laws, or actual facts, of nature; consonant to the methods of nature; according to the stated course of things, or in accordance with the laws which govern events, feelings, etc.; not exceptional or violent; legitimate; normal; regular; as, “the natural consequence of crime; a natural death; anger is a natural response to insult.”

      What can be more natural than the circumstances in the behavior of those women who had lost their husbands on this fatal day? Addison.

      3. Having to do with existing system to things; dealing with, or derived from, the creation, or the world of matter and mind, as known by man; within the scope of human reason or experience; not supernatural; as, “a natural law; natural science; history, theology.”

      I call that natural religion which men might know . . . by the mere principles of reason, improved by consideration and experience, without the help of revelation. Bp. Wilkins.

      4. Conformed to truth or reality; as: Springing from true sentiment; not artificial or exaggerated; -- said of action, delivery, etc.; as, “a natural gesture, tone, etc.” Resembling the object imitated; true to nature; according to the life; -- said of anything copied or imitated; as, “a portrait is natural”.

      5. Having the character or sentiments properly belonging to one's position; not unnatural in feelings.

      To leave his wife, to leave his babes, . . .

      He wants the natural touch. Shak.

      6. Connected by the ties of consanguinity. especially, Related by birth rather than by adoption; as, “one's natural mother”. “Natural friends.” J. H. Newman.

      7. Hence: Begotten without the sanction of law; born out of wedlock; illegitimate; bastard; as, “a natural child”.

      8. Of or pertaining to the lower or animal nature, as contrasted with the higher or moral powers, or that which is spiritual; being in a state of nature; unregenerate.

      The natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God. 1 Cor. ii. 14.

      9. ( Math. ) Belonging to, to be taken in, or referred to, some system, in which the base is 1; -- said of certain functions or numbers; as, “natural numbers, those commencing at 1; natural sines, cosines, etc., those taken in arcs whose radii are 1.”



      10. ( Mus. ) Produced by natural organs, as those of the human throat, in distinction from instrumental music. Of or pertaining to a key which has neither a flat nor a sharp for its signature, as the key of C major. Applied to an air or modulation of harmony which moves by easy and smooth transitions, digressing but little from the original key. Neither flat nor sharp; -- of a tone. Changed to the pitch which is neither flat nor sharp, by appending the sign ; as, “A natural”. Moore ( Encyc. of Music ).

      11. Existing in nature or created by the forces of nature, in contrast to production by man; not made, manufactured, or processed by humans; as, “a natural ruby; a natural bridge; natural fibers; a deposit of natural calcium sulfate”. Opposed to artificial, man-made, manufactured, processed and synthetic. [wns=2]

      12. Hence: Not processed or refined; in the same statre as that existing in nature; as, “natural wood; natural foods”.

      Natural day, the space of twenty-four hours. Chaucer.

      -- Natural fats, Natural gas, etc. See under Fat, Gas. etc. -- Natural Harmony ( Mus. ), the harmony of the triad or common chord. -- Natural history, in its broadest sense, a history or description of nature as a whole, including the sciences of botany, Zoology, geology, mineralogy, paleontology, chemistry, and physics. In recent usage the term is often restricted to the sciences of botany and Zoology collectively, and sometimes to the science of zoology alone. -- Natural law, that instinctive sense of justice and of right and wrong, which is native in mankind, as distinguished from specifically revealed divine law, and formulated human law. -- Natural modulation ( Mus. ), transition from one key to its relative keys. -- Natural order. ( Nat. Hist. ) See under order. -- Natural person. ( Law ) See under person, n. -- Natural philosophy, originally, the study of nature in general; the natural sciences; in modern usage, that branch of physical science, commonly called physics, which treats of the phenomena
      and laws of matter and considers those effects only which are unaccompanied by any change of a chemical nature; -- contrasted with mental philosophy and moral philosophy. -- Natural scale ( Mus. ), a scale which is written without flats or sharps. Model would be a preferable term, as less likely to mislead, the so-called artificial scales ( scales represented by the use of flats and sharps ) being equally natural with the so-called natural scale. -- Natural science, the study of objects and phenomena existing in nature, especially biology, chemistry, physics and their interdisciplinary related sciences; natural history, in its broadest sense; -- used especially in contradistinction to sociaNatural ( ?; 135 ), a. [OE. naturel, F. naturel, fr. L. naturalis, fr. natura. See Nature.]
      1. Fixed or determined by nature; pertaining to the constitution of a thing; belonging to native character; according to nature; essential; characteristic; innate; not artificial, foreign, assumed, put on, or acquired; as, “the natural growth of animals or plants; the natural motion of a gravitating body; natural strength or disposition; the natural heat of the body; natural color.”

      With strong natural sense, and rare force of will. Macaulay.

      2. Conformed to the order, laws, or actual facts, of nature; consonant to the methods of nature; according to the stated course of things, or in accordance with the laws which govern events, feelings, etc.; not exceptional or violent; legitimate; normal; regular; as, “the natural consequence of crime; a natural death; anger is a natural response to insult.”

      What can be more natural than the circumstances in the behavior of those women who had lost their husbands on this fatal day? Addison.

      3. Having to do with existing system to things; dealing with, or derived from, the creation, or the world of matter and mind, as known by man; within the scope of human reason or experience; not supernatural; as, “a natural law; natural science; history, theology.”

      I call that natural religion which men might know . . . by the mere principles of reason, improved by consideration and experience, without the help of revelation. Bp. Wilkins.

      4. Conformed to truth or reality; as: Springing from true sentiment; not artificial or exaggerated; -- said of action, delivery, etc.; as, “a natural gesture, tone, etc.” Resembling the object imitated; true to nature; according to the life; -- said of anything copied or imitated;
    2. Natural ( ?; 135 ), n.
      1. A native; an aboriginal. [Obs.] Sir W. Raleigh.

      2. pl. Natural gifts, impulses, etc. [Obs.] Fuller.

      3. One born without the usual powers of reason or understanding; an idiot. “The minds of naturals.” Locke.

      4. ( Mus. ) A character [] used to contradict, or to remove the effect of, a sharp or flat which has preceded it, and to restore the unaltered note.

      5. A person who has an innate talent that makes success in some specific endeavor, such as sports, much easier than for others; as, “Pele was a natural in soccer”.