Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of nook
Meaning of nook by Wiktionary Dictionary

nook


    Etymology

    From Middle English noke, nok ( “nook, corner, angle” ), of uncertain origin. Cognate with Scots neuk, nuk ( “corner, angle of a square, angular object” ). Perhaps from Old English hnoc, hnocc ( “hook, angle” ), from Proto-Germanic *hnukkaz, *hnukkô ( “a bend” ), from Proto-Indo-European *kneug- ( “to turn, press” ), from Proto-Indo-European base *ken- ( “to pinch, press, bend” ). If so, then also related to Scots nok ( “small hook” ), Norwegian dialectal nok, nokke ( “hook, angle, bent object” ), Danish nokke ( “hook” ), Swedish nocke ( “hook” ), Faroese nokki ( “crook” ), Icelandic hnokki ( “hook” ), Dutch nok ( “ridge” ), Low German Nocke ( “tip” ), Old Norse hnúka ( “to bend, crouch” ), Old English ġehnycned ( “drawn, pinched, wrinkled” ) .

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: no͝ok, IPA: /nʊk/, SAMPA: /nUk/
    • Rhymes: -ʊk

    Noun

    nook ( plural: nooks )

    1. A small corner formed by two walls; an alcove or recess or ancone .
      There was a small broom for sweeping ash kept in the nook between the fireplace bricks and the wall .
    2. A hidden or secluded spot .
      The back of the used book shop was one of her favorite nooks; she could read for hours and no one would bother her or pester her to buy .

    Derived terms

    Related terms



Explanation of nook by Wordnet Dictionary

nook


    Noun
    1. an interior angle formed by two meeting walls

    2. a sheltered and secluded place



    Definition of nook by GCIDE Dictionary

    nook


    1. Nook ( nk; 277 ), n. [OE. nok; cf. Gael. & Ir. niuc.] A narrow place formed by an angle in bodies or between bodies; a corner; a recess; a secluded retreat.

      How couldst thou find this dark, sequestered nook? Milton.