Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of obsess
Meaning of obsess by Wiktionary Dictionary

obsess


    Etymology

    From Latin obsessus, perfect passive participle of obsideō ( “sit on or in, remain, besiege” ), from ob ( “before” ) + sedeō ( “I sit” ); see sit, session, etc.; compare assess, possess .

    Verb

    obsess ( third-person singular simple present obsesses present participle obsessing, simple past and past participle obsessed )

    1. ( passive, constructed with with ) To be preoccupied with a single topic or emotion .
      Some people are obsessed with sports .
    2. ( transitive ) To dominate the thoughts of someone .
      Thoughts of her obsess my every waking moment .
    3. ( intransitive, colloquial, construed with over ) To think or talk obsessively about .
      Stop obsessing over it, will you!

    Related terms

    External links

    • obsess in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
    • obsess in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

    Anagrams

    • bosses


Explanation of obsess by Wordnet Dictionary

obsess


    Verb
    1. haunt like a ghost

    2. be preoccupied with something

    3. She is obsessing over her weight


    Definition of obsess by GCIDE Dictionary

    obsess


    1. obsess v. t. [L. obsessus, p. p. of obsidere to besiege; ob ( see Ob- ) + sedere to sit.]
      1. To besiege; to beset. [archaic] Sir T. Elyot.

      2. To excessively preoccupy the thoughts or feelings of; to haunt the mind persistently.

    2. obsess v. i. To be excessively or persistently preoccupied with something; -- usually used with on or over; as, “to obsess over an imagined insult”.

      At all ages children are driven to figure out what it takes to succeed among their peers and to give these strategies precedence over anything their parents foist on them. Weary parents know they are no match for a child's peers, and rightly obsess over the best neighborhood in which to bring their children up. Steven Pinker ( How the Mind Works, p. 449-450 [1997] ).