Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of page
Meaning of page by Wiktionary Dictionary

page


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /peɪdʒ/, X-SAMPA: /peIdZ/
    • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ
    • ( Tasmanian ) IPA: /paːʒ/

    Etymology 1

    Via Old French from Latin pāgina .

    Noun

    page ( plural: pages )

    1. One of the many pieces of paper bound together within a book or similar document .
    2. One side of a paper leaf on which one has written or printed .
    3. A figurative record or writing; a collective memory .
      the page of history
    4. ( typography ) The type set up for printing a leaf .
    5. ( Internet ) A web page .
    6. ( computing ) A block of contiguous memory of a fixed length .
    Synonyms
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    From Old French page, possibly via Italian paggio, from Late Latin pagius ( “servant” ), probably from Ancient Greek παιδίον ( paidion, “boy, lad” ), from παῖς ( pais, “child” ); some sources consider this unlikely and suggest instead Latin pagus ( “countryside” ), in sense of "boy from the rural regions". Used in English from the 13th century onwards .

    Noun

    page ( plural: pages )

    1. ( obsolete ) A serving boy – a youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education .
    2. ( UK ) A youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households .
    3. ( US ) A boy employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body .
    4. ( in libraries ) The common name given to an employee whose main purpose is to replace materials that have either been checked out or otherwise moved, back to their shelves .
    5. A boy child .
    6. A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman’s dress from the ground .
    7. A track along which pallets carrying newly molded bricks are conveyed to the hack .
    8. Any one of several species of colorful South American moths of the genus Urania .
    Synonyms

    Verb

    page ( third-person singular simple present pages present participle paging, simple past and past participle paged )

    1. ( transitive ) To attend ( someone ) as a page .
    2. ( transitive, US, obsolete in UK ) To call or summon ( someone ) .
    3. ( transitive ) To contact ( someone ) by means of a pager .
      I’ll be out all day, so page me if you need me .
    4. ( transitive ) To call ( somebody ) using a public address system so as to find them .
      An SUV parked me in. Could you please page its owner?

    Anagrams



Explanation of page by Wordnet Dictionary

page


    Verb
    1. contact, as with a pager or by calling somebody's name over a P.A. system

    2. number the pages of a book or manuscript

    3. work as a page

    4. He is paging in Congress this summer
    Noun
    1. one side of one leaf ( of a book or magazine or newspaper or letter etc. ) or the written or pictorial matter it contains

    2. in medieval times a youth acting as a knight's attendant as the first stage in training for knighthood

    3. a youthful attendant at official functions or ceremonies such as legislative functions and weddings

    4. a boy who is employed to run errands

    5. United States diplomat and writer about the Old South ( 1853-1922 )

    6. English industrialist who pioneered in the design and manufacture of aircraft ( 1885-1962 )



    Definition of page by GCIDE Dictionary

    page


    1. Page ( pāj ), n. [F., fr. It. paggio, LL. pagius, fr. Gr. παιδίον, dim. of παῖς, παιδός, a boy, servant; perh. akin to L. puer. Cf. Pedagogue, Puerile.]
      1. A serving boy; formerly, a youth attending a person of high degree, especially at courts, as a position of honor and education; now commonly, in England, a youth employed for doing errands, waiting on the door, and similar service in households; in the United States, a boy or girl employed to wait upon the members of a legislative body. Prior to 1960 only boys served as pages in the United States Congress

      He had two pages of honor -- on either hand one. Bacon.

      2. A boy child. [Obs.] Chaucer.

      3. A contrivance, as a band, pin, snap, or the like, to hold the skirt of a woman's dress from the ground.

      4. ( Brickmaking ) A track along which pallets carrying newly molded bricks are conveyed to the hack.

      5. ( Zool. ) Any one of several species of beautiful South American moths of the genus Urania.

    2. page, v. t.
      1. To attend ( one ) as a page. [Obs.] Shak.

      2. To call out a person's name in a public place, so as to deliver a message, as in a hospital, restaurant, etc.

      3. To call a person on a pager.

    3. Page, n. [F., fr. L. pagina; prob. akin to pagere, pangere, to fasten, fix, make, the pages or leaves being fastened together. Cf. Pact, Pageant, Pagination.]

      1. One side of a leaf of a book or manuscript.

      Such was the book from whose pages she sang. Longfellow.

      2. Fig.: A record; a writing; as, “the page of history”.

      3. ( Print. ) The type set up for printing a page.

    4. Page, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Paged ( pājd ); p. pr. & vb. n. Paging ( pājĭng ).] To mark or number the pages of, as a book or manuscript; to furnish with folios.