Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of pass
Meaning of pass by Wiktionary Dictionary

pass


    Pronunciation

    • ( UK ) IPA: /pɑːs/, /pæs/
    • ( US ) IPA: /pæs/
    • Rhymes: -æs, -ɑːs

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English pas, pase, pace, from passen ( “to pass” ). See the verb section, below .

    Noun

    pass ( plural: passes )

    1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier such as a mountain range; a passageway; a defile; a ford .
      a mountain pass
    2. A single movement, especially of a hand, at, over, or along anything.
    3. A single passage of a tool over something, or of something over a tool .
    4. ( fencing ) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary .
    5. ( figuratively ) A thrust; a sally of wit .
    6. A sexual advance .
      The man kicked his friend out of the house after he made a pass at his wife .
    7. ( sports ) The act of moving the ball or puck from one player to another .
    8. ( rail transport ) A passing of two trains in the same direction on a single track, when one is put into a siding to let the other overtake it .
    9. Permission or license to pass, or to go and come.
    10. A document granting permission to pass or to go and come; a passport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission; as, a railroad or theater pass; a military pass .
    11. ( baseball ) An intentional walk .
      Smith was given a pass after Jones' double .
    12. The state of things; condition; predicament; impasse.
    13. ( obsolete ) Estimation; character.
    14. ( obsolete, Chaucer, compare 'passus' ) A part, a division .
    15. The area in a restaurant kitchen where the finished dishes are passed from the chefs to the waiting staff .
    Synonyms
    Antonyms
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English passen, from Old French passer ( “to step, walk, pass” ), from Vulgar Latin *passāre ( “step, walk, pass” ), from Latin passus ( “a step” ), pandere ( “to spread, unfold, stretch” ), from Proto-Indo-European *patno-, from Proto-Indo-European *pete- ( “to spread, stretch out” ). Cognate with Old English fæþm ( “armful, fathom” ). More at fathom .

    Verb

    pass ( third-person singular simple present passes present participle passing, simple past and past participle passed )

    1. ( intransitive ) To move or be moved from one place to another .
      They passed from room to room .
    2. ( transitive ) To go past, by, over, or through; to proceed from one side to the other of; to move past .
      You will pass a house on your right .
    3. ( intransitive ) To change from one state to another .
      He passed from youth into old age .
    4. ( intransitive ) ( of time ) To elapse, to be spent .
      Their vacation passed pleasantly .
    5. ( transitive ) ( of time ) To spend .
      what will we do to pass the time?
    6. ( intransitive ) To happen .
      It will soon come to pass .
    7. ( intransitive ) To depart, to cease, to come to an end .
      At first, she was worried, but that feeling soon passed .
    8. ( intransitive ) ( often with "on" or "away" ) To die .
      His grandmother passed yesterday .
      His grandmother passed away yesterday .
      His grandmother passed on yesterday .
    9. ( intransitive, transitive ) To go successfully through ( an examination, trail, test, etc ) .
      He passed his examination .
      He attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass .
    10. ( intransitive, transitive ) To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to become valid or effective; to obtain the formal sanction of ( a legislative body ) .
      Despite the efforts of the opposition, the bill passed .
      The bill passed both houses of Congress .
      The bill passed the Senate, but did not pass in the House .
    11. ( intransitive ) To be be tolerated as a substitute for something else, to "do" .
      It isn't ideal, but it will pass .
    12. ( intransitive, law ) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance .
      The estate passes by the third clause in Mr Smith's deed to his son .
      When the old king passed away with only a daughter as an heir, the throne passed to a woman for the first time in centuries .
    13. ( transitive, sports ) To move ( the ball or puck ) to a teammate .
    14. ( intransitive, fencing ) To make a lunge or swipe .
    15. ( intransitive ) In any game, to decline to play in one's turn.
      1. ( intransitive ) In euchre, to decline to make the trump .
    16. ( intransitive, obsolete ): To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess.
      • ( Can we date this quote? ) Shakespeare:
        This passes, Master Ford .
    17. ( transitive ) To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.
    18. ( intransitive, obsolete ): To take heed.
    19. ( transitive ) To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.
      Please you that I may pass / This doing .
      I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array .
    20. ( intransitive ) To come and go in consciousness .
    21. ( intransitive ) To go from one person to another .
    22. ( intransitive ) To continue .
    23. ( intransitive ) To proceed without hindrance or opposition .
    24. ( transitive ) To live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer.
      She loved me for the dangers I had passed .
    25. ( transitive ) To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over .
      The waiter passed biscuit and cheese .
      The torch was passed from hand to hand .
      I had only time to pass my eye over the medals. - Joseph Addison
      Waller passed over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge. - Edward Hyde Clarendon
    26. ( transitive ) To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce .
    27. ( transitive ) Hence, to promise; to pledge .
      to pass sentence - Shakespeare
      Father, thy word is passed. - Milton
    28. ( transitive ) To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just .
      He passed the bill through the committee .
    29. ( transitive ) To put in circulation; to give currency to .
      pass counterfeit money
      Pass the happy news. - Alfred Tennyson
    30. ( transitive ) To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance .
      pass a person into a theater or over a railroad
    31. ( intransitive, transitive, medicine ) To eliminate ( something ) from the body by natural processes .
      He was passing blood in both his urine and his stool .
      The poison had been passed by the time of the autopsy .
    32. ( transitive, nautical ) To take a turn with ( a line, gasket, etc. ), as around a sail in furling, and make secure .
    33. ( transitive, soccer ) To kick ( the ball ) with precision rather than at full force .
      Iaquinta passes it coolly into the right-hand corner as Paston dives the other way. - The Guardian, Rob Smyth, 20 June 2010
    34. ( intransitive, law ) To make a judgment on or upon a person or case.
    35. ( LGBT ) To be regarded as a member of a specific sex .
    Synonyms
    Derived terms

    Etymology 3

    Short for password .

    Noun

    pass ( plural: passes )

    1. ( computing ) ( slang ) A password ( especially one for a restricted-access website ) .
      Anyone want to trade passes?

    Statistics

    External links

    • pass in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
    • pass in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
    • pass at OneLook Dictionary Search

    Anagrams



Explanation of pass by Wordnet Dictionary

pass


    Verb
    1. eliminate from the body

    2. Pass a kidney stone
    3. come to pass

    4. pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life

    5. disappear gradually

    6. The pain eventually passed off
    7. transmit information

    8. pass along the good news
    9. grant authorization or clearance for

    10. pass over, across, or through

    11. pass into a specified state or condition

    12. travel past

    13. The sports car passed all the trucks
    14. go across or through

    15. We passed the point where the police car had parked
    16. move past

    17. A black limousine passed by when she looked out the window
      He passed his professor in the hall
      One line of soldiers surpassed the other
    18. cause to pass

    19. She passed around the plates
    20. pass by

    21. transfer to another

    22. Our house passed under his official control
    23. be inherited by

    24. place into the hands or custody of

    25. throw ( a ball ) to another player

    26. Smith passed
    27. allow to go without comment or censure

    28. the insult passed as if unnoticed
    29. make laws, bills, etc. or bring into effect by legislation

    30. They passed the amendment
    31. go unchallenged

    32. accept or judge as acceptable

    33. The teacher passed the student although he was weak
    34. go successfully through a test or a selection process

    35. She passed the new Jersey Bar Exam and can practice law now
    36. be superior or better than some standard

    37. stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope

    38. pass time in a specific way

    Adjective
    1. of advancing the ball by throwing it

    2. a team with a good passing attack
      a pass play
    Noun
    1. success in satisfying a test or requirement

    2. his future depended on his passing that test
      he got a pass in introductory chemistry
    3. the act of throwing the ball to another member of your team

    4. the pass was fumbled
    5. an advance to first base by a batter who receives four balls

    6. a flight or run by an aircraft over a target

    7. the plane turned to make a second pass
    8. a play that involves one player throwing the ball to a teammate

    9. the coach sent in a passing play on third and long
    10. a usually brief attempt

    11. a complimentary ticket

    12. the star got passes for his family
    13. a permit to enter or leave a military installation

    14. he had to show his pass in order to get out
    15. a document indicating permission to do something without restrictions

    16. the media representatives had special passes
    17. any authorization to pass or go somewhere

    18. the pass to visit had a strict time limit


    Definition of pass by GCIDE Dictionary

    pass


    1. Pass ( pȧs, păs ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Passed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Passing.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See Pace.]
      1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point to another; to make a transit; -- usually with a following adverb or adverbal phrase defining the kind or manner of motion; as, “to pass on, by, out, in, etc.; to pass swiftly, directly, smoothly, etc.; to pass to the rear, under the yoke, over the bridge, across the field, beyond the border, etc.” “But now pass over [i. e., pass on].” Chaucer.

      On high behests his angels to and fro

      Passed frequent. Milton.

      Sweet sounds rose slowly through their mouths,

      And from their bodies passed. Coleridge.

      2. To move or be transferred from one state or condition to another; to change possession, condition, or circumstances; to undergo transition; as, “the business has passed into other hands”.

      Others, dissatisfied with what they have, . . . pass from just to unjust. Sir W. Temple.

      3. To move beyond the range of the senses or of knowledge; to pass away; hence, to disappear; to vanish; to depart; specifically, to depart from life; to die.

      Disturb him not, let him pass paceably. Shak.

      Beauty is a charm, but soon the charm will pass. Dryden.

      The passing of the sweetest soul

      That ever looked with human eyes. Tennyson.

      4. To move or to come into being or under notice; to come and go in consciousness; hence, to take place; to occur; to happen; to come; to occur progressively or in succession; to be present transitorily.

      So death passed upon all men. Rom. v. 12.

      Our own consciousness of what passes within our own mind. I. Watts.

      5. To go by or glide by, as time; to elapse; to be spent; as, “their vacation passed pleasantly”.

      Now the time is far passed. Mark vi. 35

      6. To go from one person to another; hence, to be given and taken freely; as, “clipped coin will not pass”; to obtain general acceptance; to be held or regarded; to circulate; to be current; -- followed by for before a word denoting value or estimation. “Let him pass for a man.” Shak.

      False eloquence passeth only where true is not understood. Felton.

      This will not pass for a fault in him. Atterbury.

      7. To advance through all the steps or stages necessary to validity or effectiveness; to be carried through a body that has power to sanction or reject; to receive legislative sanction; to be enacted; as, “the resolution passed; the bill passed both houses of Congress.”

      8. To go through any inspection or test successfully; to be approved or accepted; as, “he attempted the examination, but did not expect to pass”.

      9. To be suffered to go on; to be tolerated; hence, to continue; to live along. “The play may pass.” Shak.

      10. To go unheeded or neglected; to proceed without hindrance or opposition; as, “we let this act pass”.

      11. To go beyond bounds; to surpass; to be in excess. [Obs.] “This passes, Master Ford.” Shak.

      12. To take heed; to care. [Obs.]

      As for these silken-coated slaves, I pass not. Shak.

      13. To go through the intestines. Arbuthnot.

      14. ( Law ) To be conveyed or transferred by will, deed, or other instrument of conveyance; as, “an estate passes by a certain clause in a deed”. Mozley & W.

      15. ( Fencing ) To make a lunge or pass; to thrust.

      16. ( Card Playing ) To decline to play in one's turn; in euchre, to decline to make the trump.

      She would not play, yet must not pass. Prior.

      To bring to pass, To come to pass. See under Bring, and Come. -- To pass away, to disappear; to die; to vanish. “The heavens shall pass away.” 2 Pet. iii. 10. “I thought to pass away before, but yet alive I am.” Tennyson. -- To pass by, to go near and beyond a certain person or place; as, he passed by as we stood there. -- To pass into, to change by a gradual transmission; to blend or unite with. -- To pass on, to proceed. -- To pass on or To pass upon. To happen to; to come upon; to affect. “So death passed upon all men.” Rom. v. 12. “Provided no indirect act pass upon our prayers to define them.” Jer. Taylor. To determine concerning; to give judgment or sentence upon. “We may not pass upon his life.” Shak. -- To pass off, to go away; to cease; to disappear; as, “an agitation passes off”. -- To pass over, to go from one side or end to the other; to cross, as a river, road, or bridge.

    2. Pass v. t.
      1. In simple, transitive senses; as: To go by, beyond, over, through, or the like; to proceed from one side to the other of; as, “to pass a house, a stream, a boundary, etc.” Hence: To go from one limit to the other of; to spend; to live through; to have experience of; to undergo; to suffer. “To pass commodiously this life.” Milton.

      She loved me for the dangers I had passed. Shak.

      To go by without noticing; to omit attention to; to take no note of; to disregard.

      Please you that I may pass This doing. Shak.

      I pass their warlike pomp, their proud array. Dryden.

      To transcend; to surpass; to excel; to exceed.

      And strive to pass . . .

      Their native music by her skillful art. Spenser.

      Whose tender power

      Passes the strength of storms in their most desolate hour. Byron.

      To go successfully through, as an examination, trail, test, etc.; to obtain the formal sanction of, as a legislative body; as, “he passed his examination; the bill passed the senate”.

      2. In causative senses: as: To cause to move or go; to send; to transfer from one person, place, or condition to another; to transmit; to deliver; to hand; to make over; as, “the waiter passed bisquit and cheese; the torch was passed from hand to hand”.

      I had only time to pass my eye over the medals. Addison.

      Waller passed over five thousand horse and foot by Newbridge. Clarendon.

      To cause to pass the lips; to utter; to pronounce; hence, to promise; to pledge; as, “to pass sentence”. Shak.

      Father, thy word is passed. Milton.

      To cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just; as, “he passed the bill through the committee; the senate passed the law”. To put in circulation; to give currency to; as, “to pass counterfeit money”. “Pass the happy news.” Tennyson. To cause to obtain entrance, admission, or conveyance; as, “to pass a person into a theater, or over a railroad”.

      3. To emit from the bowels; to evacuate.

      4. ( Naut. ) To take a turn with ( a line, gasket, etc. ), as around a sail in furling, and make secure.

      5. ( Fencing ) To make, as a thrust, punto, etc. Shak.

      Passed midshipman. See under Midshipman. -- To pass a dividend, to omit the declaration and payment of a dividend at the time when due. -- To pass away, to spend; to waste. “Lest she pass away the flower of her age.” Ecclus. xlii. 9. -- To pass by. To disregard; to neglect. To excuse; to spare; to overlook. -- To pass off, to impose fraudulently; to palm off. “Passed himself off as a bishop.” Macaulay. -- To pass ( something ) on ( some one ) or To pass ( something ) upon ( some one ), to put upon as a trick or cheat; to palm off. “She passed the child on her husband for a boy.” Dryden. -- To pass over, to overlook; not to note or resent; as, “to pass over an affront”.

    3. Pass, n. [Cf. F. pas ( for sense 1 ), and passe, fr. passer to pass. See Pass, v. i.]
      1. An opening, road, or track, available for passing; especially, one through or over some dangerous or otherwise impracticable barrier; a passageway; a defile; a ford; as, “a mountain pass”.

      “Try not the pass!” the old man said. Longfellow.

      2. ( Fencing ) A thrust or push; an attempt to stab or strike an adversary. Shak.

      3. A movement of the hand over or along anything; the manipulation of a mesmerist.

      4. ( Rolling Metals ) A single passage of a bar, rail, sheet, etc., between the rolls.

      5. State of things; condition; predicament.

      Have his daughters brought him to this pass. Shak.

      Matters have been brought to this pass. South.

      6. Permission or license to pass, or to go and come; a psssport; a ticket permitting free transit or admission; as, “a railroad or theater pass; a military pass.”

      A ship sailing under the flag and pass of an enemy. Kent.

      7. Fig.: a thrust; a sally of wit. Shak.

      8. Estimation; character. [Obs.]

      Common speech gives him a worthy pass. Shak.

      9. [Cf. Passus.] A part; a division. [Obs.] Chaucer.

      10. ( Sports ) In football, hockey, and other team sports, a transfer of the ball, puck, etc., to another player of one's own team, usually at some distance. In American football, the pass is through the air by an act of throwing the ball.

      Pass boat ( Naut. ), a punt, or similar boat. -- Pass book. A book in which a trader enters articles bought on credit, and then passes or sends it to the purchaser. See Bank book. -- Pass box ( Mil. ), a wooden or metallic box, used to carry cartridges from the service magazine to the piece. -- Pass check, a ticket of admission to a place of entertainment, or of readmission for one who goes away in expectation of returning.