Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of plunge
Meaning of plunge by Wiktionary Dictionary

plunge


    Etymology

    From Middle English plungen, ploungen, Anglo-Norman plungier, from Old French plonger, ( Modern French plonger ), from unattested Late Latin frequentative *plumbicare ( “to throw a leaded line” ), from Latin plumbum ( “lead” ). Compare plumb, plounce .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /plʌndʒ/

    Noun

    plunge ( plural: plunges )

    1. the act of plunging or submerging
    2. a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into ( into water )
      to take the water with a plunge
      plunge in the sea
    3. ( figuratively ) the act of pitching or throwing one's self headlong or violently forward, like an unruly horse
    4. ( slang ) heavy and reckless betting in horse racing; hazardous speculation
    5. ( obsolete ) an immersion in difficulty, embarrassment, or distress; the condition of being surrounded or overwhelmed; a strait; difficulty

    Verb

    plunge ( third-person singular simple present plunges present participle plunging, simple past and past participle plunged )

    1. ( transitive ) to thrust into water, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse;
      to plunge the body into water
    2. ( figuratively, transitive ) to cast or throw into some thing, state, condition or action
      to plunge a dagger into the breast
      to plunge a nation into war
    3. ( transitive, obsolete ) to baptize by immersion
    4. ( intransitive ) to dive, leap or rush ( into water or some liquid ); to submerge one's self
      he plunged into the river
    5. ( figuratively, intransitive ) to fall or rush headlong into some thing, action, state or condition
      to plunge into debt
      to plunge into controversy
    6. ( intransitive ) to pitch or throw one's self headlong or violently forward, as a horse does
    7. ( intransitive, slang ) to bet heavily and with seeming recklessness on a race, or other contest; in an extended sense, to risk large sums in hazardous speculations
    8. ( intransitive, obsolete ) to entangle or embarrass ( mostly used in past participle )
    9. ( intransitive, obsolete ) to overwhelm, overpower

    Anagrams

    See also

    • plunge in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
    • “plunge” in OED Online, Oxford University Press, 1989 .


Explanation of plunge by Wordnet Dictionary

plunge


    Verb
    1. begin with vigor

    2. She plunged into a dangerous adventure
    3. devote ( oneself ) fully to

    4. cause to be immersed

    5. The professor plunged his students into the study of the Italian text
    6. immerse briefly into a liquid so as to wet, coat, or saturate

    7. thrust or throw into

    8. dash violently or with great speed or impetuosity

    9. She plunged at it eagerly
    10. drop steeply

    11. the stock market plunged
    12. fall abruptly

    13. It plunged to the bottom of the well
    Noun
    1. a brief swim in water

    2. a steep and rapid fall



    Definition of plunge by GCIDE Dictionary

    plunge


    1. Plunge v. t. [imp. & p. p. Plunged ; p. pr. & vb. n. Plunging] [OE. ploungen, OF. plongier, F. plonger, fr. ( assumed ) LL. plumbicare, fr. L. plumbum lead. See Plumb.]
      1. To thrust into water, or into any substance that is penetrable; to immerse; to cause to penetrate or enter quickly and forcibly; to thrust; as, “to plunge the body into water; to plunge a dagger into the breast”. Also used figuratively; as, “to plunge a nation into war”. “To plunge the boy in pleasing sleep.” Dryden.

      Bound and plunged him into a cell. Tennyson.

      We shall be plunged into perpetual errors. I. Watts.

      2. To baptize by immersion.

      3. To entangle; to embarrass; to overcome. [Obs.]

      Plunged and graveled with three lines of Seneca. Sir T. Browne.

    2. Plunge, v. i.
      1. To thrust or cast one's self into water or other fluid; to submerge one's self; to dive, or to rush in; as, “he plunged into the river”. Also used figuratively; as, “to plunge into debt”.

      Forced to plunge naked in the raging sea. Dryden.

      To plunge into guilt of a murther. Tillotson.

      2. To pitch or throw one's self headlong or violently forward, as a horse does.

      Some wild colt, which . . . flings and plunges. Bp. Hall.

      3. To bet heavily and with seeming recklessness on a race, or other contest; in an extended sense, to risk large sums in hazardous speculations. [Cant]

      Plunging fire ( Gun. ), firing directed upon an enemy from an elevated position.

    3. Plunge, n.
      1. The act of thrusting into or submerging; a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into, or as into, water; as, “to take the water with a plunge”.

      2. Hence, a desperate hazard or act; a state of being submerged or overwhelmed with difficulties. [R.]

      She was brought to that plunge, to conceal her husband's murder or accuse her son. Sir P. Sidney.

      And with thou not reach out a friendly arm,

      To raise me from amidst this plunge of sorrows? Addison.

      3. The act of pitching or throwing one's self headlong or violently forward, like an unruly horse.

      4. Heavy and reckless betting in horse racing; hazardous speculation. [Cant]

      Plunge bath, an immersion by plunging; also, a large bath in which the bather can wholly immerse himself. -- Plunge battery, or plunging battery ( Elec. ), a voltaic battery so arranged that the plates can be plunged into, or withdrawn from, the exciting liquid at pleasure.