Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of proclaim
Meaning of proclaim by Wiktionary Dictionary

proclaim


    Etymology

    From Latin proclamare, pro- ( forth ) + clamare ( shout, cry out ) .

    Pronunciation

    • Rhymes: -eɪm

    Anagrams



Explanation of proclaim by Wordnet Dictionary

proclaim


    Verb
    1. praise, glorify, or honor

    2. state or announce

    3. The King will proclaim an amnesty
    4. declare formally

    5. He was proclaimed King
    6. affirm or declare as an attribute or quality of



    Definition of proclaim by GCIDE Dictionary

    proclaim


    1. Announce v. t. [imp. & p. p. Announced ( ); p. pr. & vb. n. Announcing] [OF. anoncier, F. annoncer, fr. L. annuntiare; ad + nuntiare to report, relate, nuntius messenger, bearer of news. See Nuncio, and cf. Annunciate.]

      1. To give public notice, or first notice of; to make known; to publish; to proclaim.

      Her [Q. Elizabeth's] arrival was announced through the country by a peal of cannon from the ramparts. Gilpin.

      2. To pronounce; to declare by judicial sentence.

      Publish laws, announce

      Or life or death. Prior.

      Syn. -- To proclaim; publish; make known; herald; declare; promulgate. -- To Publish, Announce, Proclaim, Promulgate. We publish what we give openly to the world, either by oral communication or by means of the press; as, “to publish abroad the faults of our neighbors”. We announce what we declare by anticipation, or make known for the first time; as, to announce the speedy publication of a book; to announce the approach or arrival of a distinguished personage. We proclaim anything to which we give the widest publicity; as, to proclaim the news of victory. We promulgate when we proclaim more widely what has before been known by some; as, to promulgate the gospel.

    2. Announce v. t. [imp. & p. p. Announced ( ); p. pr. & vb. n. Announcing] [OF. anoncier, F. annoncer, fr. L. annuntiare; ad + nuntiare to report, relate, nuntius messenger, bearer of news. See Nuncio, and cf. Annunciate.]

      1. To give public notice, or first notice of; to make known; to publish; to proclaim.

      Her [Q. Elizabeth's] arrival was announced through the country by a peal of cannon from the ramparts. Gilpin.

      2. To pronounce; to declare by judicial sentence.

      Publish laws, announce

      Or life or death. Prior.

      Syn. -- To proclaim; publish; make known; herald; declare; promulgate. -- To Publish, Announce, Proclaim, Promulgate. We publish what we give openly to the world, either by oral communication or by means of the press; as, “to publish abroad the faults of our neighbors”. We announce what we declare by anticipation, or make known for the first time; as, to announce the speedy publication of a book; to announce the approach or arrival of a distinguished personage. We proclaim anything to which we give the widest publicity; as, to proclaim the news of victory. We promulgate when we proclaim more widely what has before been known by some; as, to promulgate the gospel.

    3. Proclaim v. t. [imp. & p. p. Proclaimed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Proclaiming.] [OE. proclamen, L. proclamare; pro before, forward + clamare to call or cry out: cf. F. proclamer. See Claim.]

      1. To make known by public announcement; to give wide publicity to; to publish abroad; to promulgate; to declare; as, “to proclaim war or peace”.

      To proclaim liberty to the captives. Isa. lxi. 1.

      For the apparel oft proclaims the man. Shak.

      Throughout the host proclaim

      A solemn council forthwith to be held. Milton.

      2. To outlaw by public proclamation.

      I heard myself proclaimed. Shak.

      Syn. -- To publish; promulgate; declare; announce. See Announce.