Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of running
Meaning of running by Wiktionary Dictionary

running


    Pronunciation

    • Rhymes: -ʌnɪŋ

    Adjective

    running ( not comparable )

    1. That which runs or run .
      running paint
      running taps

    Adverb

    running ( not comparable )

    1. ( informal ) consecutively; in a row
      Mom's strawberry jam won the blue ribbon at the Holland County Fair three years running .

    Noun

    running ( plural: runnings )

    1. The action of the verb to run .
      His running of the business leaves something to be desired .
    2. The activity of running as a form of exercise, as a sport, or for any other reason
      Running is good exercise .
      Running for their lives was all they could do after the explosion .

    Verb

    running

    1. Present participle of run .

    Statistics



Explanation of running by Wordnet Dictionary

running


    Adjective
    1. continually repeated over a period of time

    2. a running joke among us
    3. ( of e.g. a machine ) performing or capable of performing

    4. in running ( or working ) order
    5. executed or initiated by running

    6. running plays worked better than pass plays
      took a running jump
      a running start
    7. ( of fluids ) moving or issuing in a stream

    8. as mountain stream with freely running water
      hovels without running water
    9. of advancing the ball by running

    10. the team's running plays worked better than its pass plays
    11. measured lengthwise

    12. cost of lumber per running foot
    Noun
    1. the act of running

    2. the act of participating in an athletic competition involving running on a track

    3. a play in which a player attempts to carry the ball through or past the opposing team

    4. the coach put great emphasis on running
    5. the act of administering or being in charge of something

    6. he has responsibility for the running of two companies at the same time
    7. the state of being in operation

    8. the engine is running smoothly


    Definition of running by GCIDE Dictionary

    running


    1. Run ( rŭn ), v. i. [imp. Ran ( răn ) or Run; p. p. Run; p. pr. & vb. n. Running.] [OE. rinnen, rennen ( imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen ). AS. rinnan to flow ( imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen ), and iernan, irnan, to run ( imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen ); akin to D. runnen, rennen, OS. & OHG. rinnan, G. rinnen, rennen, Icel. renna, rinna, Sw. rinna, ränna, Dan. rinde, rende, Goth. rinnan, and perh. to L. oriri to rise, Gr. ὀρνύναι to stir up, rouse, Skr. ṛ ( cf. Origin ), or perh. to L. rivus brook ( cf. Rival ). √11. Cf. Ember, a., Rennet.]
      1. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Specifically: --

      2. Of voluntary or personal action: To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten.

      “Ha, ha, the fox!” and after him they ran. Chaucer.

      To flee, as from fear or danger.

      As from a bear a man would run for life. Shak.

      To steal off; to depart secretly.

      To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress.

      Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain. 1 Cor. ix. 24.

      To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt.

      Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast, to rend my heart with grief and run distracted? Addison.

      To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, “to run through life; to run in a circle”. To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another.

      Virgil, in his first Georgic, has run into a set of precepts foreign to his subject. Addison.

      To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on. To creep, as serpents.

      3. Of involuntary motion: To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, “rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold”. To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread.

      The fire ran along upon the ground. Ex. ix. 23.

      To become fluid; to melt; to fuse.

      As wax dissolves, as ice begins to run. Addison.

      Sussex iron ores run freely in the fire. Woodward.

      To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round. To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, “the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago”. To extend; to reach; as, “the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary”.

      She saw with joy the line immortal run,

      Each sire impressed, and glaring in his son. Pope.

      To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station. To make progress; to proceed; to pass.

      As fast as our time runs, we should be very glad in most part of our lives that it ran much faster. Addison.

      To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, “this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week”.

      When we desire anything, our minds run wholly on the good circumstances of it; when it is obtained, our minds run wholly on the bad ones. Swift.

      To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west.

      Where the generally allowed practice runs counter to it. Locke.

      Little is the wisdom, where the flight

      So runs against all reason. Shak.

      To be in form thus, as a combination of words.

      The king's ordinary style runneth, “Our sovereign lord the king.” Bp. Sanderson.

      To be popularly known; to be generally received.

      Men gave them their own names, by which they run a great while in Rome. Sir W. Temple.

      Neither was he ignorant what report ran of himself. Knolles.


      To have growth or development; as, “boys and girls run up rapidly”.

      If the richness of the ground cause turnips to run to leaves. Mortimer.

      To tend, as to an effect or consequence; to incline.

      A man's nature runs either to herbs or weeds. Bacon.

      Temperate climates run into moderate governments. Swift.

      To spread and blend together; to unite; as, “colors run in washingRun ( rŭn ), v. i. [imp. Ran ( răn ) or Run; p. p. Run; p. pr. & vb. n. Running.] [OE. rinnen, rennen ( imp. ran, p. p. runnen, ronnen ). AS. rinnan to flow ( imp. ran, p. p. gerunnen ), and iernan, irnan, to run ( imp. orn, arn, earn, p. p. urnen ); akin to D. runnen, rennen, OS. & OHG. rinnan, G. rinnen, rennen, Icel. renna, rinna, Sw. rinna, ränna, Dan. rinde, rende, Goth. rinnan, and perh. to L. oriri to rise, Gr. ὀρνύναι to stir up, rouse, Skr. ṛ ( cf. Origin ), or perh. to L. rivus brook ( cf. Rival ). √11. Cf. Ember, a., Rennet.]
      1. To move, proceed, advance, pass, go, come, etc., swiftly, smoothly, or with quick action; -- said of things animate or inanimate. Hence, to flow, glide, or roll onward, as a stream, a snake, a wagon, etc.; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a horse, a dog. Specifically: --

      2. Of voluntary or personal action: To go swiftly; to pass at a swift pace; to hasten.

      “Ha, ha, the fox!” and after him they ran. Chaucer.

      To flee, as from fear or danger.

      As from a bear a man would run for life. Shak.

      To steal off; to depart secretly.

      To contend in a race; hence, to enter into a contest; to become a candidate; as, to run for Congress.

      Know ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize? So run, that ye may obtain. 1 Cor. ix. 24.

      To pass from one state or condition to another; to come into a certain condition; -- often with in or into; as, to run into evil practices; to run in debt.

      Have I not cause to rave and beat my breast, to rend my heart with grief and run distracted? Addison.

      To exert continuous activity; to proceed; as, “to run through life; to run in a circle”. To pass or go quickly in thought or conversation; as, to run from one subject to another.

      Virgil, in his first Georgic, has run into a set of precepts foreign to his subject. Addison.

      To discuss; to continue to think or speak about something; -- with on. To make numerous drafts or demands for payment, as upon a bank; -- with on. To creep, as serpents.

      3. Of involuntary motion: To flow, as a liquid; to ascend or descend; to course; as, “rivers run to the sea; sap runs up in the spring; her blood ran cold”. To proceed along a surface; to extend; to spread.

      The fire ran along upon the ground. Ex. ix. 23.

      To become fluid; to melt; to fuse.

      As wax dissolves, as ice begins to run. Addison.

      Sussex iron ores run freely in the fire. Woodward.

      To turn, as a wheel; to revolve on an axis or pivot; as, a wheel runs swiftly round. To travel; to make progress; to be moved by mechanical means; to go; as, “the steamboat runs regularly to Albany; the train runs to Chicago”. To extend; to reach; as, “the road runs from Philadelphia to New York; the memory of man runneth not to the contrary”.

      She saw with joy the line immortal run,

      Each sire impressed, and glaring in his son. Pope.

      To go back and forth from place to place; to ply; as, the stage runs between the hotel and the station. To make progress; to proceed; to pass.

      As fast as our time runs, we should be very glad in most part of our lives that it ran much faster. Addison.

      To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, “this engine runs night and day; the mill runs six days in the week”.

      When we desire anything, our minds run wholly on the good circumstances of it; when it is obtained, our minds run wholly on the bad ones. Swift.

      To have a course or direction; as, a line runs east and west.

      Where the generally allowed practice runs counter to it. Locke.

      Little is the wisdom, where the flight

      So runs against all reason. Shak.

      [1913 ”
    2. Running , a.
      1. Moving or advancing by running. Specifically, of a horse: Having a running gait; not a trotter or pacer. trained and kept for running races; as, “a running horse”. Law.

      2. Successive; one following the other without break or intervention; -- said of periods of time; as, “to be away two days running; to sow land two years running”.

      3. Flowing; easy; cursive; as, “a running hand”.

      4. Continuous; keeping along step by step; as, “he stated the facts with a running explanation”. “A running conquest.” Milton.

      What are art and science if not a running commentary on Nature? Hare.

      5. ( Bot. ) Extending by a slender climbing or trailing stem; as, “a running vine”.

      6. ( Med. ) Discharging pus; as, “a running sore”.

      Running block ( Mech. ), a block in an arrangement of pulleys which rises or sinks with the weight which is raised or lowered. -- Running board, a narrow platform extending along the side of a locomotive. -- Running bowsprit ( Naut. ) Same as Reefing bowsprit. -- Running days ( Com. ), the consecutive days occupied on a voyage under a charter party, including Sundays and not limited to the working days. Simmonds. -- Running fire, a constant fire of musketry or cannon. -- Running gear, the wheels and axles of a vehicle, and their attachments, in distinction from the body; all the working parts of a locomotive or other machine, in distinction from the framework. -- Running hand, a style of rapid writing in which the letters are usually slanted and the words formed without lifting the pen; -- distinguished from round hand. -- Running part ( Naut. ), that part of a rope that is hauled upon, -- in distinction from the standing part. -- Running rigging ( Naut. ), that part of a ship's rigging or ropes which passes through
      blocks, etc.; -- in distinction from standing rigging. -- Running title ( Print. ), the title of a book or chapter continued from page to page on the upper margin.

    3. Running, n. The act of one who, or of that which runs; as, “the running was slow”.

      2. That which runs or flows; the quantity of a liquid which flows in a certain time or during a certain operation; as, “the first running of a still”.

      3. The discharge from an ulcer or other sore.

      At long running, in the long run. [Obs.] Jer. Taylor.