Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of setting
Meaning of setting by Wiktionary Dictionary

setting


    Pronunciation

    • Rhymes: -ɛtɪŋ

    Verb

    setting

    1. Present participle of set .

    Noun

    setting ( plural: settings )

    1. The time, place and circumstance in which something ( such as a story or picture ) is set; context; scenario .
    2. A piece of metal in which a precious stone or gem is fixed to form a piece of jewelry .
    3. A standard level or placement that a knob or control is placed at, for example, the volume setting on a television .

    Adjective

    setting ( comparative more setting, superlative most setting )

    1. that disappears below the horizon

    Anagrams



Explanation of setting by Wordnet Dictionary

setting


    Noun
    1. arrangement of scenery and properties to represent the place where a play or movie is enacted

    2. a mounting consisting of a piece of metal ( as in a ring or other jewelry ) that holds a gem in place

    3. a table service for one person

    4. a place setting of sterling flatware
    5. the context and environment in which something is set

    6. the perfect setting for a ghost story
    7. the physical position of something

    8. he changed the setting on the thermostat
    9. the set of facts or circumstances that surround a situation or event

    10. the state of the environment in which a situation exists

    11. you can't do that in a university setting


    Definition of setting by GCIDE Dictionary

    setting


    1. Set ( sĕt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Set; p. pr. & vb. n. Setting.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. sätta, Dan. stte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root of E. sit. √154. See Sit, and cf. Seize.]
      1. To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, “to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end”.

      I do set my bow in the cloud. Gen. ix. 13.

      2. Hence, to attach or affix ( something ) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.

      Set your affection on things above. Col. iii. 2.

      The Lord set a mark upon Cain. Gen. iv. 15.

      3. To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state ( described by the accompanying words ); to cause to be.

      The Lord thy God will set thee on high. Deut. xxviii. 1.

      I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother. Matt. x. 35.

      Every incident sets him thinking. Coleridge.

      4. To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to. Specifically: --

      To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, “to set a coach in the mud”.

      They show how hard they are set in this particular. Addison.

      To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, “to set one's countenance”.

      His eyes were set by reason of his age. 1 Kings xiv. 4.

      On these three objects his heart was set. Macaulay.

      Make my heart as a millstone, set my face as a flint. Tennyson.

      To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant; as, “to set pear trees in an orchard”.

      To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting; as, “to set glass in a sash”.

      And him too rich a jewel to be set

      In vulgar metal for a vulgar use. Dryden.

      To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle; as, “to set milk for cheese”.

      5. To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt. Specifically: --

      To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, “to set ( that is, to hone ) a razor; to set a saw”.

      Tables for to sette, and beddes make. Chaucer.

      To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, “to set the sails of a ship”.

      To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, “to set a psalm”. Fielding.

      To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, “to set a broken bone”.

      To make to agree with some standard; as, “to set a watch or a clock”.

      ( Masonry ) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.

      6. To stake at play; to wager; to risk.

      I have set my life upon a cast,

      And I will stand the hazard of the die. Shak.

      7. To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing.

      Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute. Dryden.

      8. To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, “to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse”.

      9. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.

      High on their heads, with jewels richly set,

      Each lady wore a radiant coronet. Dryden.

      Pastoral dales thin set with modern farms. Wordsworth.

      10. To value; to rate; -- with at.

      Be you contented, wearing now the garland,

      To have a son set your decrees at naught. Shak.

      I do not set my life at a pin's fee. Shak.

      11. To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; -- said of hunting dogs.

      12. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, “to set an example; to set lessons to be learned”.

      13. To suit; to become; as, “it sets him ill”. [Scot.]

      14. ( Print. ) To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, “to set type; to set a page.”

      To set abroach. See Abroach. [Obs.] Shak. -- To set against, to oppose; to set in comparison with, or to oppose to, as an equivalent in exchange; as, “to set one thing against another”. -- To set agoingakin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. sätta, Dan. stte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root of E. sit. √154. See Sit, and cf. Seize.]
      1. To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, “to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end”.

      I do set my bow in the cloud. Gen. ix. 13.

      2. Hence, to attach or affix ( something ) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.

      Set your affection on things above. Col. iii. 2.

      The Lord set a mark upon Cain. Gen. iv. 15.

      3. To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state ( described by the accompanying words ); to cause to be.

      The Lord thy God will set thee on high. Deut. xxviii. 1.

      I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother. Matt. x. 35.

      Every incident sets him thinking. Coleridge.

      4. To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to. Specifically: --

      To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, “to set a coach in the mud”.

      They show how hard they are set in this particular. Addison.

      To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, “to set one's countenance”.

      His eyes were set by reason of his age. 1 Kings xiv. 4.

      On these three objects his heart was set. Macaulay.

      Make my heart as a millstone, set my face as a flint. Tennyson.

      To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant; as, “to set pear trees in an orchard”.

      To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting; as, “to set glass in a sash”.

      And him too rich a jewel to be set

      In vulgar metal for a vulgar use. Dryden.

      To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle; as, “to set milk for cheese”.

      5. To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt. Specifically: --

      To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, “to set ( that is, to hone ) a razor; to set a saw”.

      Tables for to sette, and beddes make. Chaucer.

      To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, “to set the sails of a ship”.

      To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, “to set a psalm”. Fielding.

      To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, “to set a broken bone”.

      To make to agree with some standard; as, “to set a watch or a clock”.

      ( Masonry ) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.

      6. To stake at play; to wager; to risk.

      I have set my life upon a cast,

      And I will stand the hazard of the die. Shak.

      7. To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing.

      Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute. Dryden.

      8. To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, “to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse”.

      9. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.

      High on their heads, with jewels richly set,

      Each lady wore a radiant coronet. Dryden.

      Pastoral dales thin set with modern farms. Wordsworth.

      10. To value; to rate; -- with at.

      Be you contented, wearing now the garland,

      To have a son set your decrees at naught. Shak.

      I do not set my life at a pin's fee. Shak.

      11. To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; -- said of hunting dogs.

      12. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, “to set an example; to set lessons to be learned”.

      13. To suit; to become; as, “it sets him ill”. [Scot.]

      14. ( Print. ) To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, “to set type; to set a page.”

      To set abroach. See Abroach. [Obs.] Shak. -- To set against, to oppose; to set in comparison with, or to oppose to, as an equivalent in exchange; as, “to set one thing against another”. -- To set agoingakin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. sätta, Dan. stte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root of E. sit. √154. See Sit, and cf. Seize.]
      1. To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, “to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end”.

      I do set my bow in the cloud. Gen. ix. 13.

      2. Hence, to attach or affix ( something ) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.

      Set your affection on things above. Col. iii. 2.

      The Lord set a mark upon Cain. Gen. iv. 15.

      3. To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state ( described by the accompanying words ); to cause to be.

      The Lord thy God will set thee on high. Deut. xxviii. 1.

      I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother. Matt. x. 35.

      Every incident sets him thinking. Coleridge.

      4. To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to. Specifically: --

      To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, “to set a coach in the mud”.

      They show how hard they are set in this particular. Addison.

      To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, “to set one”
    2. Setting , n.
      1. The act of one who, or that which, sets; as, “the setting of type, or of gems; the setting of the sun; the setting ( hardening ) of moist plaster of Paris; the setting ( set ) of a current.”

      2. The act of marking the position of game, as a setter does; also, hunting with a setter. Boyle.

      3. Something set in, or inserted.

      Thou shalt set in it settings of stones. Ex. xxviii. 17.

      4. That in which something, as a gem, is set; as, “the gold setting of a jeweled pin”.

      5. the time, place, and circumstances in which an event ( real or fictional ) occurs; as, “the setting of a novel”.

      Setting coat ( Arch. ), the finishing or last coat of plastering on walls or ceilings. -- Setting dog, a setter. See Setter, n., 2. -- Setting pole, a pole, often iron-pointed, used for pushing boats along in shallow water. -- Setting rule. ( Print. ) A composing rule.