Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of shut
Meaning of shut by Wiktionary Dictionary

shut


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /ʃʌt/, X-SAMPA: /SVt/
    • Rhymes: -ʌt

    Etymology 1

    From Middle English shutten, shetten, from Old English scyttan ( “to cause rapid movement, shoot a bolt, shut, bolt, shut to, discharge a debt, pay off” ), from Proto-Germanic *skutjanan, *skuttjanan ( “to bar, bolt” ), from Proto-Germanic *skuttan, *skuttjō ( “bar, bolt, shed” ), from Proto-Indo-European *( s )keud- ( “to drive, fall upon, rush” ). Cognate with Dutch schutten ( “to shut in, lock up” ), German schützen ( “to shut out, dam, protect, guard” ), Albanian skuth ( “a mean and deceitful person” ) .

    Verb

    shut ( third-person singular simple present shuts present participle shutting, simple past and past participle shut )

    1. ( transitive ) To close, to stop from being open .
      Please shut the door .
      The light was so bright I had to shut my eyes .
    2. ( intransitive ) To close, to stop being open .
      If you wait too long, the automatic door will shut .
    3. ( transitive or intransitive, 主にUK ) To close a business temporarily, or ( of a business ) to be closed .
      The pharmacy is shut on Sunday .
    Usage notes

    Except when part of one of the derived terms listed below, almost every use of shut can be replaced by close. The reverse is not true -- there are many uses of close that cannot be replaced by shut .

    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    Variation of chute or shute ( archaic, related to shoot ) from Old English scēotan .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /ʃʌt/, X-SAMPA: /SVt/
    • Rhymes: -ʌt

    Noun

    shut ( plural: shuts )

    1. ( UK, Shropshire dialect ) A narrow alley or passage acting as a short cut through the buildings between two streets .
    Synonyms
    • ( alleyway ): alley, gennel ( Northern Ireland ), ginnel ( Yorkshire and Lancashire ), gitty ( East Midlands ), jitty ( Midlands ), passage, snicket ( Northern England ), wynd ( Scotland )

    Anagrams



Explanation of shut by Wordnet Dictionary

shut


    Verb
    1. move so that an opening or passage is obstructed

    2. shut the window
    3. become closed

    4. prevent from entering

    5. The trees were shutting out all sunlight
    Adjective
    1. not open

    2. the door slammed shut
    3. used especially of mouth or eyes

    4. his eyes were shut against the sunlight


    Definition of shut by GCIDE Dictionary

    shut


    1. Shut v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shut; p. pr. & vb. n. Shutting.] [OE. shutten, schutten, shetten, schitten, AS. scyttan to shut or lock up ( akin to D. schutten, G. schützen to protect ), properly, to fasten with a bolt or bar shot across, fr. AS. sceótan to shoot. √159. See Shoot.]
      1. To close so as to hinder ingress or egress; as, “to shut a door or a gate; to shut one's eyes or mouth.”

      2. To forbid entrance into; to prohibit; to bar; as, “to shut the ports of a country by a blockade”.

      Shall that be shut to man which to the beast

      Is open? Milton.

      3. To preclude; to exclude; to bar out. “Shut from every shore.” Dryden.

      4. To fold together; to close over, as the fingers; to close by bringing the parts together; as, “to shut the hand; to shut a book.”

      To shut in. To inclose; to confine. “The Lord shut him in.” Cen. vii. 16. To cover or intercept the view of; as, one point shuts in another. -- To shut off. To exclude. To prevent the passage of, as steam through a pipe, or water through a flume, by closing a cock, valve, or gate. -- To shut out, to preclude from entering; to deny admission to; to exclude; as, “to shut out rain by a tight roof”. -- To shut together, to unite; to close, especially to close by welding. -- To shut up. To close; to make fast the entrances into; as, “to shut up a house”. To obstruct. “Dangerous rocks shut up the passage.” Sir W. Raleigh. To inclose; to confine; to imprison; to fasten in; as, “to shut up a prisoner”.

      Before faith came, we were kept under the law, shut up unto the faith which should afterwards be revealed. Gal. iii. 23.

      To end; to terminate; to conclude.

      When the scene of life is shut up, the slave will be above his master if he has acted better. Collier.

      To unite, as two pieces of metal by welding. To cause to become silent by authority, argument, or force.

    2. Shut v. t. [imp. & p. p. Shut; p. pr. & vb. n. Shutting.] [OE. shutten, schutten, shetten, schitten, AS. scyttan to shut or lock up ( akin to D. schutten, G. schützen to protect ), properly, to fasten with a bolt or bar shot across, fr. AS. sceótan to shoot. √159. See Shoot.]
      1. To close so as to hinder ingress or egress; as, “to shut a door or a gate; to shut one's eyes or mouth.”

      2. To forbid entrance into; to prohibit; to bar; as, “to shut the ports of a country by a blockade”.

      Shall that be shut to man which to the beast

      Is open? Milton.

      3. To preclude; to exclude; to bar out. “Shut from every shore.” Dryden.

      4. To fold together; to close over, as the fingers; to close by bringing the parts together; as, “to shut the hand; to shut a book.”

      To shut in. To inclose; to confine. “The Lord shut him in.” Cen. vii. 16. To cover or intercept the view of; as, one point shuts in another. -- To shut off. To exclude. To prevent the passage of, as steam through a pipe, or water through a flume, by closing a cock, valve, or gate. -- To shut out, to preclude from entering; to deny admission to; to exclude; as, “to shut out rain by a tight roof”. -- To shut together, to unite; to close, especially to close by welding. -- To shut up. To close; to make fast the entrances into; as, “to shut up a house”. To obstruct. “Dangerous rocks shut up the passage.” Sir W. Raleigh. To inclose; to confine; to imprison; to fasten in; as, “to shut up a prisoner”.

      Before faith came, we were kept under the law, shut up unto the faith which should afterwards be revealed. Gal. iii. 23.

      To end; to terminate; to conclude.

      When the scene of life is shut up, the slave will be above his master if he has acted better. Collier.

      To unite, as two pieces of metal by welding. To cause to become silent by authority, argument, or force.

    3. Shut, v. i. To close itself; to become closed; as, “the door shuts; it shuts hard.”

      To shut up, to cease speaking. [Colloq.] T. Hughes.

    4. Shut, a.
      1. Closed or fastened; as, “a shut door”.

      2. Rid; clear; free; as, “to get shut of a person”. [Now dialectical or local, Eng. & U.S.] L'Estrange.

      3. ( Phon. ) Formed by complete closure of the mouth passage, and with the nose passage remaining closed; stopped, as are the mute consonants, p, t, k, b, d, and hard g. H. Sweet. Cut off sharply and abruptly by a following consonant in the same syllable, as the English short vowels, ă, ĕ, ĭ, ŏ, ŭ, always are.

    5. Shut, n. The act or time of shutting; close; as, “the shut of a door”.

      Just then returned at shut of evening flowers. Milton.

      2. A door or cover; a shutter. [Obs.] Sir I. Newton.

      3. The line or place where two pieces of metal are united by welding.

      Cold shut, the imperfection in a casting caused by the flowing of liquid metal upon partially chilled metal; also, the imperfect weld in a forging caused by the inadequate heat of one surface under working.