Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of spite
Meaning of spite by Wiktionary Dictionary

spite


    Pronunciation

    • enPR: spīt, IPA: /spaɪt/, X-SAMPA: /spaIt/
    • Rhymes: -aɪt

    Etymology 1

    This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology .

    Noun

    spite ( usually uncountable; plural: spites )

    1. Ill will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; a desire to vex or injure; petty malice; grudge; rancor .
      He was so filled with spite for his ex-wife, he could not hold down a job .
      He did it just for spite .
    2. Vexation; chagrin; mortification .

    Verb

    spite ( third-person singular simple present spites present participle spiting, simple past and past participle spited )

    1. ( transitive ) To treat maliciously; to try to injure or thwart .
      She soon married again, to spite her ex-husband .
    2. ( transitive, obsolete ) To be angry at; to hate .
      The Danes, then […] pagans, spited places of religion. — Fuller .
    3. ( transitive ) To fill with spite; to offend; to vex .
      Darius, spited at the Magi, endeavoured to abolish not only their learning, but their language. — Sir. W. Temple .
    Related terms

    Etymology 2

    Preposition

    spite

    1. Notwithstanding; despite .

    Statistics

    Anagrams

    • piets, piste, stipe


Explanation of spite by Wordnet Dictionary

spite


    Verb
    1. hurt the feelings of

    Noun
    1. malevolence by virtue of being malicious or spiteful or nasty

    2. feeling a need to see others suffer



    Definition of spite by GCIDE Dictionary

    spite


    1. Spite n. [Abbreviated fr. despite.]
      1. Ill-will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite. Pope.

      This is the deadly spite that angers. Shak.

      2. Vexation; chargrin; mortification. [R.] Shak.

      In spite of, or Spite of, in opposition to all efforts of; in defiance or contempt of; notwithstanding. “Continuing, spite of pain, to use a knee after it had been slightly injured.” H. Spenser. “And saved me in spite of the world, the devil, and myself.” South. “In spite of all applications, the patient grew worse every day.” Arbuthnot. See Syn. under Notwithstanding. -- To owe one a spite, to entertain a mean hatred for him.

      Syn. -- Pique, rancor; malevolence; grudge. -- Spite, Malice. Malice has more reference to the disposition, and spite to the manifestation of it in words and actions. It is, therefore, meaner than malice, thought not always more criminal. “ Malice . . . is more frequently employed to express the dispositions of inferior minds to execute every purpose of mischief within the more limited circle of their abilities.” Cogan. “Consider eke, that spite availeth naught.” Wyatt. See Pique.

    2. Spite, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Spited; p. pr. & vb. n. Spiting.]
      1. To be angry at; to hate. [Obs.]

      The Danes, then . . . pagans, spited places of religion. Fuller.

      2. To treat maliciously; to try to injure or thwart.

      3. To fill with spite; to offend; to vex. [R.]

      Darius, spited at the Magi, endeavored to abolish not only their learning, but their language. Sir. W. Temple.