Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of Sprung



Definition of sprung by GCIDE Dictionary

Sprung


  1. Spring ( sprĭng ), v. i. [imp. Sprang ( sprăng ) or Sprung ( sprŭng ); p. p. Sprung; p. pr. & vb. n. Springing.] [AS. springan; akin to D. & G. springen, OS. & OHG. springan, Icel. & Sw. springa, Dan. springe; cf. Gr. σπέρχεσθαι to hasten. Cf. Springe, Sprinkle.]

    1. To leap; to bound; to jump.

    The mountain stag that springs

    From height to height, and bounds along the plains. Philips.

    2. To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot.

    And sudden light

    Sprung through the vaulted roof. Dryden.

    3. To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert.

    Watchful as fowlers when their game will spring. Otway.

    4. To fly back; as, “a bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power”.

    5. To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped; as, “a piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning”.

    6. To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; -- often followed by up, forth, or out.

    Till well nigh the day began to spring. Chaucer.

    To satisfy the desolate and waste ground, and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth. Job xxxviii. 27.

    Do not blast my springing hopes. Rowe.

    O, spring to light; auspicious Babe, be born. Pope.

    7. To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle.

    [They found] new hope to spring

    Out of despair, joy, but with fear yet linked. Milton.

    8. To grow; to thrive; to prosper.

    What makes all this, but Jupiter the king,

    At whose command we perish, and we spring? Dryden.

    To spring at, to leap toward; to attempt to reach by a leap. -- To spring forth, to leap out; to rush out. -- To spring in, to rush in; to enter with a leap or in haste. -- To spring on or To spring upon, to leap on; to rush on with haste or violence; to assault.

  2. Spring ( sprĭng ), v. i. [imp. Sprang ( sprăng ) or Sprung ( sprŭng ); p. p. Sprung; p. pr. & vb. n. Springing.] [AS. springan; akin to D. & G. springen, OS. & OHG. springan, Icel. & Sw. springa, Dan. springe; cf. Gr. σπέρχεσθαι to hasten. Cf. Springe, Sprinkle.]

    1. To leap; to bound; to jump.

    The mountain stag that springs

    From height to height, and bounds along the plains. Philips.

    2. To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot.

    And sudden light

    Sprung through the vaulted roof. Dryden.

    3. To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert.

    Watchful as fowlers when their game will spring. Otway.

    4. To fly back; as, “a bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power”.

    5. To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped; as, “a piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning”.

    6. To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; -- often followed by up, forth, or out.

    Till well nigh the day began to spring. Chaucer.

    To satisfy the desolate and waste ground, and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth. Job xxxviii. 27.

    Do not blast my springing hopes. Rowe.

    O, spring to light; auspicious Babe, be born. Pope.

    7. To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle.

    [They found] new hope to spring

    Out of despair, joy, but with fear yet linked. Milton.

    8. To grow; to thrive; to prosper.

    What makes all this, but Jupiter the king,

    At whose command we perish, and we spring? Dryden.

    To spring at, to leap toward; to attempt to reach by a leap. -- To spring forth, to leap out; to rush out. -- To spring in, to rush in; to enter with a leap or in haste. -- To spring on or To spring upon, to leap on; to rush on with haste or violence; to assault.

  3. Sprung ( sprŭng ), imp. & p. p. of Spring.

  4. Sprung, a. ( Naut. ) Said of a spar that has been cracked or strained.