Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of stone
Meaning of stone by Wiktionary Dictionary

stone


    Stones.

    Etymology

    From Middle English stan, ston, from Old English stān, from Proto-Germanic *stainaz ( cf. Dutch steen, German Stein ), from Proto-Indo-European *stāi- ( compare Latin stiria ‘icicle’, Russian стена ( stená, “wall” ), Ancient Greek στῖον ( stîon, “pebble” ), stear ‘tallow’, Albanian shtëng ( “hardened or pressed matter” ), Sanskrit styāyate ‘it hardens’ ) .

    Pronunciation

    • ( RP ) IPA: /stəʊn/
    • ( GenAm ) IPA: /stoʊn/
    • Rhymes: -əʊn

    Noun

    stone ( countable and uncountable; plural: stones )

    1. ( uncountable ) A hard earthen substance that can form large rocks and boulders .
    2. A small piece of stone .
    3. A gemstone, a jewel, especially a diamond .
    4. ( UK ) ( plural:: stone ) A unit of mass equal to 14 pounds. Used to measure the weights of people, animals, cheese, wool, etc. 1 stone ≈ 6.3503 kilograms
    5. ( botany ) The central part of some fruits, particularly drupes; consisting of the seed and a hard endocarp layer .
      a peach stone
    6. ( medicine ) A hard, stone-like deposit .
      kidney stone
    7. ( board games ) A playing piece made of any hard material, used in various board games such as backgammon, and go .
    8. A dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones .
      stone colour:
    9. ( curling ) A 42-pound, precisely shaped piece of granite with a handle attached, which is bowled down the ice .

    Synonyms

    Verb

    stone ( third-person singular simple present stones present participle stoning, simple past and past participle stoned )

    1. ( transitive ) To pelt with stones, especially to kill by pelting with stones .
    2. ( transitive ) To remove a stone from ( fruit etc. ) .
    3. ( intransitive ) To form a stone during growth, with reference to fruit etc .
    4. ( transitive, slang ) To intoxicate, especially with narcotics. ( Usually in passive )

    Synonyms

    Adjective

    stone ( not comparable )

    1. Constructed of stone .
      stone walls
    2. Having the appearance of stone .
      stone pot
    3. Of a dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones .
    4. ( African US Vernacular ) Used as an intensifier .
      She is one stone fox .

    Adverb

    stone ( not comparable )

    1. As a stone ( used with following adjective ) .
      My father is stone deaf. This soup is stone cold .
    2. ( slang ) Absolutely, completely ( used with following adjective ) .
      I went stone crazy after she left .

    Derived terms

    See also

    • Appendix:Colors

    Statistics

    Anagrams

    • notes, onset, set on, seton, SONET, steno, tones


Explanation of stone by Wordnet Dictionary

stone


    Verb
    1. remove the pits from

    2. kill by throwing stones at

    3. People wanted to stone the woman who had a child out of wedlock
    Adjective
    1. of any of various dull tannish or grey colors

    Noun
    1. building material consisting of a piece of rock hewn in a definite shape for a special purpose

    2. he wanted a special stone to mark the site
    3. a lack of feeling or expression or movement

    4. he must have a heart of stone
      her face was as hard as stone
    5. a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter

    6. United States architect ( 1902-1978 )

    7. United States jurist who served on the United States Supreme Court as chief justice ( 1872-1946 )

    8. United States journalist who advocated liberal causes ( 1907-1989 )

    9. United States feminist and suffragist ( 1818-1893 )

    10. United States filmmaker ( born in 1946 )

    11. United States jurist who was named chief justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1941 by Franklin D. Roosevelt ( 1872-1946 )

    12. the hard inner ( usually woody ) layer of the pericarp of some fruits ( as peaches or plums or cherries or olives ) that contains the seed

    13. you should remove the stones from prunes before cooking
    14. an avoirdupois unit used to measure the weight of a human body

    15. a heavy chap who must have weighed more than twenty stone
    16. material consisting of the aggregate of minerals like those making up the Earth's crust

    17. stone is abundant in New England and there are many quarries
    18. a crystalline rock that can be cut and polished for jewelry

    19. she had jewels made of all the rarest stones


    Definition of stone by GCIDE Dictionary

    stone


    1. Stone n. [OE. ston, stan, AS. stān; akin to OS. & OFries. stēn, D. steen, G. stein, Icel. steinn, Sw. sten, Dan. steen, Goth. stains, Russ. stiena a wall, Gr. , , a pebble. √167. Cf. Steen.]
      1. Concreted earthy or mineral matter; also, any particular mass of such matter; as, “a house built of stone; the boy threw a stone; pebbles are rounded stones.” “Dumb as a stone.” Chaucer.

      They had brick for stone, and slime . . . for mortar. Gen. xi. 3.

      ☞ In popular language, very large masses of stone are called rocks; small masses are called stones; and the finer kinds, gravel, or sand, or grains of sand. Stone is much and widely used in the construction of buildings of all kinds, for walls, fences, piers, abutments, arches, monuments, sculpture, and the like.

      2. A precious stone; a gem. “Many a rich stone.” Chaucer. “Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels.” Shak.

      3. Something made of stone. Specifically: -

      The glass of a mirror; a mirror. [Obs.]

      Lend me a looking-glass;

      If that her breath will mist or stain the stone,

      Why, then she lives. Shak.

      A monument to the dead; a gravestone. Gray.

      Should some relenting eye

      Glance on the where our cold relics lie. Pope.

      4. ( Med. ) A calculous concretion, especially one in the kidneys or bladder; the disease arising from a calculus.

      5. One of the testes; a testicle. Shak.

      6. ( Bot. ) The hard endocarp of drupes; as, “the stone of a cherry or peach”. See Illust. of Endocarp.

      7. A weight which legally is fourteen pounds, but in practice varies with the article weighed. [Eng.]

      ☞ The stone of butchers' meat or fish is reckoned at 8 lbs.; of cheese, 16 lbs.; of hemp, 32 lbs.; of glass, 5 lbs.

      8. Fig.: Symbol of hardness and insensibility; torpidness; insensibility; as, “a heart of stone”.

      I have not yet forgot myself to stone. Pope.

      9. ( Print. ) A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc., before printing; -- called also imposing stone.

      ☞ Stone is used adjectively or in composition with other words to denote made of stone, containing a stone or stones, employed on stone, or, more generally, of or pertaining to stone or stones; as, stone fruit, or stone-fruit; stone-hammer, or stone hammer; stone falcon, or stone-falcon. Compounded with some adjectives it denotes a degree of the quality expressed by the adjective equal to that possessed by a stone; as, stone-dead, stone-blind, stone-cold, stone-still, etc.

      Atlantic stone, ivory. [Obs.] “Citron tables, or Atlantic stone.” Milton. -- Bowing stone. Same as Cromlech. Encyc. Brit. -- Meteoric stones, stones which fall from the atmosphere, as after the explosion of a meteor. -- Philosopher's stone. See under Philosopher. -- Rocking stone. See Rocking-stone. -- Stone age, a supposed prehistoric age of the world when stone and bone were habitually used as the materials for weapons and tools; -- called also flint age. The bronze age succeeded to this. -- Stone bass ( Zool. ), any one of several species of marine food fishes of the genus Serranus and allied genera, as Serranus Couchii, and Polyprion cernium of Europe; -- called also sea perch. -- Stone biter ( Zool. ), the wolf fish. -- Stone boiling, a method of boiling water or milk by dropping hot stones into it, -- in use among savages. Tylor. -- Stone borer ( Zool. ), any animal that bores stones; especially, one of certain bivalve mollusks which burrow in limestone. See Lithodomus, and Saxicava. -- Stone bramb
      le ( Bot. ), a European trailing species of bramble ( Rubus saxatilis ). -- Stone-break. [Cf. G. steinbrech.] ( Bot. ) Any plant of the genus Saxifraga; saxifrage. -- Stone bruise, a sore spot on the bottom of the foot, from a bruise by a stone. -- Stone canal. ( Zool. ) Same as Sand canal, under Sand. -- Stone cat ( Zool. ), any one of several species of small fresh-water North American catfishes of the genus Noturus. They have sharp pectoral spines with which they inflict painful wounds. -- Stone coal, hard coal; mineral coal; anthracite coal. -- Stone coral ( Zool. ), any hard calcareous coral. -- Stone crab. ( Zool. ) A large crab ( Menippe mercenaria ) found on the southern coast of the United States and much used as food. A European spider crab ( Lithodes maia ). Stone crawfish ( Zool. ), a European crawfish ( Astacus torrentium ), by many writers considered only a variety of the common species ( Astacus fluviatilis ). -- Stone curlew. ( Zool. ) A large plover found in Europe ( Edicnemus crepitans ). It frequents st
      ony places. Called also thick-kneed plover or bustard, and thick-knee. The whimbrel. [Prov. Eng.] The willet. [Local, U.S.] -- Stone crush. Same as Stone bruise, above. -- Stone eater. ( Zool. ) Same as Stone borer, above. -- Stone falcon ( Zool. ), the merlin. -- Stone fern ( Bot. ), a European fern ( Asplenium Ceterach ) which grows on rocks and walls. -- Stone fly Stone n. [OE. ston, stan, AS. stān; akin to OS. & OFries. stēn, D. steen, G. stein, Icel. steinn, Sw. sten, Dan. steen, Goth. stains, Russ. stiena a wall, Gr. , , a pebble. √167. Cf. Steen.]
      1. Concreted earthy or mineral matter; also, any particular mass of such matter; as, “a house built of stone; the boy threw a stone; pebbles are rounded stones.” “Dumb as a stone.” Chaucer.

      They had brick for stone, and slime . . . for mortar. Gen. xi. 3.

      ☞ In popular language, very large masses of stone are called rocks; small masses are called stones; and the finer kinds, gravel, or sand, or grains of sand. Stone is much and widely used in the construction of buildings of all kinds, for walls, fences, piers, abutments, arches, monuments, sculpture, and the like.

      2. A precious stone; a gem. “Many a rich stone.” Chaucer. “Inestimable stones, unvalued jewels.” Shak.

      3. Something made of stone. Specifically: -

      The glass of a mirror; a mirror. [Obs.]

      Lend me a looking-glass;

      If that her breath will mist or stain the stone,

      Why, then she lives. Shak.

      A monument to the dead; a gravestone. Gray.

      Should some relenting eye

      Glance on the where our cold relics lie. Pope.

      4. ( Med. ) A calculous concretion, especially one in the kidneys or bladder; the disease arising from a calculus.

      5. One of the testes; a testicle. Shak.

      6. ( Bot. ) The hard endocarp of drupes; as, “the stone of a cherry or peach”. See Illust. of Endocarp.

      7. A weight which legally is fourteen pounds, but in practice varies with the article weighed. [Eng.]

      ☞ The stone of butchers' meat or fish is reckoned at 8 lbs.; of cheese, 16 lbs.; of hemp, 32 lbs.; of glass, 5 lbs.

      8. Fig.: Symbol of hardness and insensibility; torpidness; insensibility; as, “a heart of stone”.

      I have not yet forgot myself to stone. Pope.

      9. ( Print. ) A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc., before printing; -- called also imposing stone.

      ☞ Stone is used adjectively or in composition with other words to denote made of stone
    2. Stone v. t. [imp. & p. p. Stoned ; p. pr. & vb. n. Stoning.] [From Stone, n.: cf. AS. stnan, Goth. stainjan.]
      1. To pelt, beat, or kill with stones.

      And they stoned Stephen, calling upon God, and saying, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit. Acts vii. 59.

      2. To make like stone; to harden.

      O perjured woman! thou dost stone my heart. Shak.

      3. To free from stones; also, to remove the seeds of; as, “to stone a field; to stone cherries; to stone raisins”.

      4. To wall or face with stones; to line or fortify with stones; as, “to stone a well; to stone a cellar”.

      5. To rub, scour, or sharpen with a stone.