Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of stood
Meaning of stood by Wiktionary Dictionary

stood


    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /ˈstʊd/, SAMPA: /"stUd/
    • Rhymes: -ʊd

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    Anagrams




Definition of stood by GCIDE Dictionary

stood


  1. Stand ( stănd ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Stood ( std ); p. pr. & vb. n. Standing.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, stān, D. staan, OS. standan, stān, OHG. stantan, stān, G. stehen, Icel. standa, Dan. staae, Sw. stå, Goth. standan, Russ. stoiate, L. stare, Gr. ἰστάναι to cause to stand, στῆναι to stand, Skr. sthā. √163. Cf. Assist, Constant, Contrast, Desist, Destine, Ecstasy, Exist, Interstice, Obstacle, Obstinate, Prest, n., Rest remainder, Solstice, Stable, a. & n., Staff, Stage, Stall, n., Stamen, Stanchion, Stanza, State, n., Statute, Stead, Steed, Stool, Stud of horses, Substance, System.]
    1. To be at rest in an erect position; to be fixed in an upright or firm position; as: To be supported on the feet, in an erect or nearly erect position; -- opposed to lie, sit, kneel, etc. “I pray you all, stand up!” Shak. To continue upright in a certain locality, as a tree fixed by the roots, or a building resting on its foundation.

    It stands as it were to the ground yglued. Chaucer.

    The ruined wall

    Stands when its wind-worn battlements are gone. Byron.

    2. To occupy or hold a place; to have a situation; to be situated or located; as, “Paris stands on the Seine”.

    Wite ye not where there stands a little town? Chaucer.

    3. To cease from progress; not to proceed; to stop; to pause; to halt; to remain stationary.

    I charge thee, stand,

    And tell thy name. Dryden.

    The star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. Matt. ii. 9.

    4. To remain without ruin or injury; to hold good against tendencies to impair or injure; to be permanent; to endure; to last; hence, to find endurance, strength, or resources.

    My mind on its own center stands unmoved. Dryden.

    5. To maintain one's ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe.

    Readers by whose judgment I would stand or fall. Spectator.

    6. To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition. “The standing pattern of their imitation.” South.

    The king granted the Jews . . . to gather themselves together, and to stand for their life. Esther viii. 11.

    7. To adhere to fixed principles; to maintain moral rectitude; to keep from falling into error or vice.

    We must labor so as to stand with godliness, according to his appointment. Latimer.

    8. To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation; as, “Christian charity, or love, stands first in the rank of gifts”.

    9. To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist. “Sacrifices . . . which stood only in meats and drinks.” Heb. ix. 10.

    Accomplish what your signs foreshow;

    I stand resigned, and am prepared to go. Dryden.

    Thou seest how it stands with me, and that I may not tarry. Sir W. Scott.

    10. To be consistent; to agree; to accord.

    Doubt me not; by heaven, I will do nothing

    But what may stand with honor. Massinger.

    11. ( Naut. ) To hold a course at sea; as, “to stand from the shore; to stand for the harbor”.

    From the same parts of heaven his navy stands. Dryden.

    12. To offer one's self, or to be offered, as a candidate.

    He stood to be elected one of the proctors of the university. Walton.

    13. To stagnate; not to flow; to be motionless.

    Or the black water of Pomptina stands. Dryden.

    14. To measure when erect on the feet.

    Six feet two, as I think, he stands. Tennyson.

    15. ( Law ) To be or remain as it is; to continue in force; to have efficacy or validity; to abide. Bouvier. To appear in court. Burrill.

    16. ( Card Playing ) To be, or signify that one is, willing to play with one's hand as dealt.

    Stand by ( Naut. ), a preparatory order, equivalent to Be ready. -- To stand against, to oppose; to resist. -- To stand by. To be near; to be a spectator; to be present. To be aside; to be set aside with disregard. “In the interim [we] let the commands stand by neglected.” Dr. H. More. To maintain; to defend; to support; not to desert; as, “to stand by one's principles or party”. To rest on for support; to be supported by. Whitgift. To remain as a spectator, and take no part in an action; as, “we can't just stand idly by while people are being killed”. -- To stand corrected, to be set right, as after an error in a statement of fact; to admit having been in error. Wycherley. -- To stand fast, to be fixed; to be unshaken or immovable. -- To stand firmly on, to be satisfied or convinced of.Stand ( stănd ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Stood ( std ); p. pr. & vb. n. Standing.] [OE. standen; AS. standan; akin to OFries. stonda, stān, D. staan, OS. standan, stān, OHG. stantan, stān, G. stehen, Icel. standa,
    Dan. staae, Sw. stå, Goth. standan, Russ. stoiate, L. stare, Gr. ἰστάναι to cause to stand, στῆναι to stand, Skr. sthā. √163. Cf. Assist, Constant, Contrast, Desist, Destine, Ecstasy, Exist, Interstice, Obstacle, Obstinate, Prest, n., Rest remainder, Solstice, Stable, a. & n., Staff, Stage, Stall, n., Stamen, Stanchion, Stanza, State, n., Statute, Stead, Steed, Stool, Stud of horses, Substance, System.]
    1. To be at rest in an erect position; to be fixed in an upright or firm position; as: To be supported on the feet, in an erect or nearly erect position; -- opposed to lie, sit, kneel, etc. “I pray you all, stand up!” Shak. To continue upright in a certain locality, as a tree fixed by the roots, or a building resting on its foundation.

    It stands as it were to the ground yglued. Chaucer.

    The ruined wall

    Stands when its wind-worn battlements are gone. Byron.

    2. To occupy or hold a place; to have a situation; to be situated or located; as, “Paris stands on the Seine”.

    Wite ye not where there stands a little town? Chaucer.

    3. To cease from progress; not to proceed; to stop; to pause; to halt; to remain stationary.

    I charge thee, stand,

    And tell thy name. Dryden.

    The star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. Matt. ii. 9.

    4. To remain without ruin or injury; to hold good against tendencies to impair or injure; to be permanent; to endure; to last; hence, to find endurance, strength, or resources.

    My mind on its own center stands unmoved. Dryden.

    5. To maintain one's ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe.

    Readers by whose judgment I would stand or fall. Spectator.

    6. To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition. “The standing pattern of their imitation.” South.

    The king granted the Jews . . . to gather themselves together, and to stand for their life. Esther viii. 11.

    7. To adhere to fixed principles; to maintain moral rectitude; to keep from falling into error or vice.

    We must labor so as to stand with godliness, according to his appointment. Latimer.

    8. To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation; as, “Christian charity, or love, stands first in the rank of gifts”.

    9. To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist. “Sacrifices . . . which stood only in meats and drinks.” Heb. ix. 10.

    Accomplish what your signs foreshow;

    I stand resigned, and am prepared to go. Dryden.

  2. Stood , imp. & p. p. of Stand.