Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of take
Meaning of take by Wiktionary Dictionary

take


    Etymology

    From Middle English taken ( “to take, lay hold of, grasp, strike” ), from Old English tacan ( “to grasp, touch” ), probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse taka ( “to touch, take” ), from Proto-Germanic *tēkanan ( “to touch” ), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₁g-, *dh₁g- ( “to touch” ). Gradually displaced Middle English nimen ( “to take” ), from Old English niman ( “to take” ). Cognate with Icelandic taka ( “to take” ), Danish tage ( “to take, seize” ), Middle Dutch taken ( “to grasp” ), Middle Low German tacken ( “to grasp” ). See tackle .

    Pronunciation

    • enPR: tāk, IPA: /teɪk/, [tʰeɪk], X-SAMPA: /teIk/, [t_heIk]
    • Rhymes: -eɪk

    Verb

    take ( third-person singular simple present takes present participle taking, simple past took, past participle taken )

    1. ( transitive ) To grasp with the hands .
    2. ( transitive ) To grab and move to oneself .
      I’ll take that plate off the table .
    3. ( transitive ) To get into one's possession .
    4. ( transitive ) To accept .
      Do you take sugar in your coffee?
      We take all major credit cards .
    5. ( transitive, military ) To gain a position by force .
      After a bloody battle, they were able to take the city .
    6. ( transitive ) To have sex forcefully with, possibly without consent .
      The rapist took his victims in dark alleys .
    7. ( transitive ) To carry, particularly to a particular destination .
      I'll take the plate with me .
    8. ( transitive ) To choose .
      I'll take the blue plates .
    9. ( transitive ) To support or carry without failing or breaking .
      That truck bed will only take two tons .
    10. ( transitive ) To endure or cope with .
      I can take the noise, but I can't take the smell .
    11. ( transitive, baseball ) To not swing at a pitch
      He’ll probably take this one .
    12. ( transitive ) To ingest medicine, drugs, etc .
      I take aspirin every day to thin my blood .
    13. ( transitive, often with “for” ) To assume or interpret to be .
      Do you take me for a fool?
      I take it you're not going?
      Looking at him as he came into the room, I took him for his father .
      He was often taken to be a man of means .
    14. ( transitive ) To enroll ( in a class, or a course of study ) .
      I plan to take math, physics, literature and flower arrangement this semester .
    15. ( transitive ) To participate in, undergo, or experience .
      Aren't you supposed to take your math final today?
      When will you take your vacation?
      I had to take a pee .
    16. ( transitive, climbing ) To tighten ( take up ) a belaying rope. Often used imperatively .
    17. ( transitive ) To fight or attempt to fight somebody. ( See also take on. )
      Don't try to take that guy. He's bigger than you .
    18. ( intransitive ) To stick, persist, thrive or remain .
      I started some tomato seeds last spring, but they didn't take .
    19. ( intransitive ) To become .
      They took ill within 3 hours .
      She took sick with the flu .
    20. ( transitive, cricket ) To catch the ball; especially for the wicket-keeper to catch the ball after the batsman has missed or edged it .
    21. ( transitive ) To require .
      Looks like it's gonna take a taller person to get that down .
      Finishing this on schedule will take a lot of overtime .
    22. ( transitive, photography ) To capture using a photographic camera .
      The photographer took a picture of our family .
    23. ( transitive ) To last or expend [an amount of time] .
      I estimate the trip will take about ten minutes .
    24. ( transitive ) To use
      Let's take the bus today .
      This camera takes 35mm film .
    25. ( transitive ) To consider as an instance or example .
      I've had a lot of problems recently. Take last Monday. The car broke down on the way to work. Then ...etc .
    26. ( obsolete, transitive ) To deliver, give ( something ); to entrust.
    27. ( reflexive ) To go.
    28. ( intransitive ) To habituate to or gain competency at a task
      I take to swimming like a fish .
    29. ( sports ) This word needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}} .
      The kick is taken from where the foul occurred .
      Pirès ran in to take the kick .
      The throw-in is taken from the point where the ball crossed the touch-line .

    Usage notes

    In informal speech, especially in certain sociolects, took is replaced by the proscribed form taked .

    Quotations

    Synonyms

    Antonyms

    Noun

    take ( plural: takes )

    1. An act of taking .
    2. Something that is taken .
    3. A ( 1 ) profit, ( 2 ) reward, ( 3 ) bribe, illegal payoff or unethical kickback .
      ( 1 ) & ( 2 ): He wants half of the take if he helps with the job .
      ( 3 ) The mayor is on the take .
    4. An interpretation or view; perspective .
      What’s your take on this issue, Fred?
    5. ( film ) An attempt to record a scene .
      It’s a take .
      Act seven, scene three, take two .
    6. ( rugby ) A catch .
    7. ( acting ) A facial gesture in response to an event .
      I did a take when I saw the new car in the driveway .
    8. ( cricket ) A catch of the ball, especially by the wicket-keeper .

    See also

    These need to be checked and put in the section for the noun or verb senses as appropriate

    Statistics

    Anagrams

    • Kate
    • teak


Explanation of take by Wordnet Dictionary

take


    Verb
    1. be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness

    2. remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract

    3. take the gun from your pocket
    4. ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial

    5. take a pulse
      A reading was taken of the earth's tremors
    6. take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect

    7. be seized or affected in a specified way

    8. take sick
      be taken drunk
    9. be a student of a certain subject

    10. interpret something in a certain way

    11. How should I take this message?
      You can't take credit for this!
    12. accept or undergo, often unwillingly

    13. pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives

    14. Take any one of these cards
    15. take into consideration for exemplifying purposes

    16. Take the case of China
    17. take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs

    18. lay claim to

    19. make a film or photograph of something

    20. take a scene
    21. obtain by winning

    22. Winner takes all
    23. point or cause to go ( blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment ) towards

    24. Take a swipe at one's opponent
    25. serve oneself to, or consume regularly

    26. I don't take sugar in my coffee
    27. get into one's hands, take physically

    28. Take a cookie!
      Can you take this bag, please
    29. have sex with

    30. He had taken this woman when she was most vulnerable
    31. travel or go by means of a certain kind of transportation, or a certain route

    32. He takes the bus to work
      She takes Route 1 to Newark
    33. proceed along in a vehicle

    34. occupy or take on

    35. take somebody somewhere

    36. can you take me to the main entrance?
    37. head into a specified direction

    38. take something or somebody with oneself somewhere

    39. Take these letters to the boss
    40. experience or feel or submit to

    41. Take a test
      Take the plunge
    42. to get into a position of having, e.g., safety, comfort

    43. take shelter from the storm
    44. take into one's possession

    45. We are taking an orphan from Romania
      I'll take three salmon steaks
    46. take by force

    47. buy, select

    48. I'll take a pound of that sausage
    49. engage for service under a term of contract

    50. Shall we take a guide in Rome?
    51. receive or obtain regularly

    52. We take the Times every day
    53. make use of or accept for some purpose

    54. take a risk
      take an opportunity
    55. receive willingly something given or offered

    56. admit into a group or Definition of take by GCIDE Dictionary

      take


      1. Take ( tāk ), obs. p. p. of Take. Taken. Chaucer.


      2. Take, v. t. [imp. Took ( tk ); p. p. Taken ( tāk'n ); p. pr. & vb. n. Taking.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. tēkan to touch; of uncertain origin.]
        1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or otherwise; to grasp; to get into one's hold or possession; to procure; to seize and carry away; to convey. Hence, specifically: --

        To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; as, “to take an army, a city, or a ship”; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; -- said of a disease, misfortune, or the like.

        This man was taken of the Jews. Acts xxiii. 27.

        Men in their loose, unguarded hours they take;

        Not that themselves are wise, but others weak. Pope.

        They that come abroad after these showers are commonly taken with sickness. Bacon.

        There he blasts the tree and takes the cattle

        And makes milch kine yield blood. Shak.

        To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm.

        Neither let her take thee with her eyelids. Prov. vi. 25.

        Cleombroutus was so taken with this prospect, that he had no patience. Wake.

        I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, -- a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, -- which took me more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions. Moore.

        To make selection of; to choose; also, to turn to; to have recourse to; as, “to take the road to the right”.

        Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was taken. 1 Sam. xiv. 42.

        The violence of storming is the course which God is forced to take for the destroying . . . of sinners. Hammond.

        To employ; to use; to occupy; hence, to demand; to require; as, “it takes so much cloth to make a coat; it takes five hours to get to Boston from New York by car”.

        This man always takes time . . . before he passes his judgments. I. Watts.

        To form a likeness of; to copy; to delineate; to picture; as, “to take a picture of a person”.

        Beauty alone could beauty take so right. Dryden.

        To draw; to deduce; to derive. [R.]

        The firm belief of a future judgment is the most forcible motive to a good life, because taken from this consideration of the most lasting happiness and misery. Tillotson.

        To assume; to adopt; to acquire, as shape; to permit to one's self; to indulge or engage in; to yield to; to have or feel; to enjoy or experience, as rest, revenge, delight, shame; to form and adopt, as a resolution; -- used in general senses, limited by a following complement, in many idiomatic phrases; as, “to take a resolution; I take the liberty to say”.

        To lead; to conduct; as, “to take a child to church”.

        To carry; to convey; to deliver to another; to hand over; as, “he took the book to the bindery; he took a dictionary with him”.

        He took me certain gold, I wot it well. Chaucer.

        To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; -- with from; as, “to take the breath from one; to take two from four”.

        2. In a somewhat passive sense, to receive; to bear; to endure; to acknowledge; to accept. Specifically: --

        To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit.

        Ye shall take no satisfaction for the life of a murderer. Num. xxxv. 31.

        Let not a widow be taken into the number under threescore. 1 Tim. v. 10.

        To receive as something to be eaten or drunk; to partake of; to swallow; as, “to take food or wine”.

        Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear; as, “to take a hedge or fence”.

        To bear without ill humor or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure; as, “to take a joke; he will take an affront from no man”.

        To admit, as, something presented to the mind; not to dispute; to allow; to accept; to receive in thought; to entertain in opinion; to understand; to interpret; to regard or look upon; to consider; to suppose; as, “to take a thing for granted; this I take to be man's motive; to take men for spies”.

        You take me right. Bacon.

        Charity, taken in its largest extent, is nothing else but the science love of God and our neighbor. Wake.

        [He] took that for virtue and affection which was nothing but vice in a disguise. South.

        You'd doubt his sex, and take him for a girl. Tate.

        To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; -- used in general senses; as, “to take a form or shape”.

        I take thee at thy word. Rowe.

        Yet thy moist clay is pliant to command; . . .

        Not take the mold. Dryden.

        3. To make a picture, photograph, or the like, of; as, “to take a group or a scene”. [Colloq.]Take, v. t. [imp. Took ( tk ); p. p. Taken ( tāk'n ); p. pr. & vb. n. Taking.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. tēkan to touch; of uncertain origin.]
        1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or otherwise; to grasp; to get into one's hold or possession; to procure; to seize and carry away; to convey. Hence, specifically: --

        To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; as, “to take an army, a city, or a ship”; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; -- said of a disease, misfortune, or the like.

        This man was taken of the Jews. Acts xxiii. 27.

        Men in their loose, unguarded hours they take;

        Not that themselves are wise, but others weak. Pope.

        They that come abroad after these showers are commonly taken with sickness. Bacon.

        There he blasts the tree and takes the cattle

        And makes milch kine yield blood. Shak.

        To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm.

        Neither let her take thee with her eyelids. Prov. vi. 25.

        Cleombroutus was so taken with this prospect, that he had no patience. Wake.

        I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, -- a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, -- which took me more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions. Moore.

        To make selection of; to choose; also, to turn to; to have recourse to; as, “to take the road to the right”.

        Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was taken. 1 Sam. xiv. 42.

        The violence of storming is the course which God is forced to take for the destroying . . . of sinners. Hammond.

        To employ; to use; to occupy; hence, to demand; to require; as, “it takes so much cloth to make a coat; it takes five hours to get to Boston from New York by car”.

        This man always takes time . . . before he passes his judgments. I. Watts.

        To form a likeness of; to copy; to delineate; to picture; as, “to take a picture of a person”.

        Beauty alone could beauty take so right. Dryden.

        To draw; to deduce; to derive. [R.]

        The firm belief of a future judgment is the most forcible motive to a good life, because taken from this consideration of the most lasting happiness and misery. Tillotson.

        To assume; to adopt; to acquire, as shape; to permit to one's self; to indulge or engage in; to yield to; to have or feel; to enjoy or experience, as rest, revenge, delight, shame; to form and adopt, as a resolution; -- used in general senses, limited by a following complement, in many idiomatic phrases; as, “to take a resolution; I take the liberty to say”.

        To lead; to conduct; as, “to take a child to church”.

        To carry; to convey; to deliver to another; to hand over; as, “he took the book to the bindery; he took a dictionary with him”.

        He took me certain gold, I wot it well. Chaucer.

        To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; -- with from; as, “to take the breath from one; to take two from four”.

        2. In a somewhat passive sense, to receive; to bear; to endure; to acknowledge; to accept. Specifically: --

        To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit.

        Ye shall take no satisfaction for the life of a murderer. Num. xxxv. 31.

        Let not a widow be taken into the number under threescore. 1 Tim. v. 10.

        To receive as something to be eaten or drunk; to partake of; to swallow; as, “to take food or wine”.

        Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear; as, “to take a hedge or fence”.

        To bear without ill humor or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure; as, “to take a joke; he will take an affront from no man”.

        To admit, as, something presented to the mind; not to dispute; to allow; to accept; to receive in thought; to entertain in opinion; to understand; to interpret; to regard or look upon; to consider; to suppose; as, “to take a thing for granted; this I take to be man's motive; to take men for spies”.

        You take me right. Bacon.

        Charity, taken in its largest extent, is nothing else but the science love of God and our neighbor. Wake.

        [He] took that for virtue and affection which was nothing but vice in a disguise. South.

        You'd doubt his sex, and take him for a girl. Tate.

        To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; -- used in general senses; as, “to take a form or shape”.

        I take thee at thy word. Rowe.

        Yet thy moist clay is pliant to command; . . .

        Not take the mold. Dryden.

        3. To make a picture, photograph, or the like, of; as, “to take a group or a scene”. [Colloq.]Take, v. t. [imp. Took ( tk ); p. p. Taken ( tāk'n ); p. pr. & vb. n. Taking.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. tēkan to touch; of uncertain origin.]
        1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or otherwise; to grasp; to get into one's hold or possession; to procure; to seize and carry away; to convey. Hence, specifically: --

        To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; as, “to take an army, a city, or a ship”; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; -- said of a disease, misfortune, or the like.

        This man was taken of the Jews. Acts xxiii. 27.

        Men in their loose, unguarded hours they take;

        Not that themselves are wise, but others weak. Pope.

        They that come abroad after these showers are commonly taken with sickness. Bacon.

        There he blasts the tree and takes the cattle

        And makes milch kine yield blood. Shak.

        To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm.

        Neither let her take thee with her eyelids. Prov. vi. 25.

        Cleombroutus was so taken with this prospect, that he had no patience. Wake.

        I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, -- a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, -- which took me more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions. Moore.

        To make selection of; to choose; also, to turn to; to have recourse to; as, “to take the road to the right”.

        Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was taken. 1 Sam. xiv. 42.

        The violence of storming is the course which God is forced to take for the destroying . . . of sinners. Hammond .
      3. Take , v. i.
        1. To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; as, “he was inoculated, but the virus did not take”. Shak.

        When flame taketh and openeth, it giveth a noise. Bacon.

        In impressions from mind to mind, the impression taketh, but is overcome . . . before it work any manifest effect. Bacon.

        2. To please; to gain reception; to succeed.

        Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake,

        And hint he writ it, if the thing should take. Addison.

        3. To move or direct the course; to resort; to betake one's self; to proceed; to go; -- usually with to; as, “the fox, being hard pressed, took to the hedge”.

        4. To admit of being pictured, as in a photograph; as, “his face does not take well”.

        To take after. To learn to follow; to copy; to imitate; as, “he takes after a good pattern”. To resemble; as, “the son takes after his father”. -- To take in with, to resort to. [Obs.] Bacon. -- To take on, to be violently affected; to express grief or pain in a violent manner. -- To take to. To apply one's self to; to be fond of; to become attached to; as, “to take to evil practices”. “If he does but take to you, . . . you will contract a great friendship with him.” Walpole. To resort to; to betake one's self to. “Men of learning, who take to business, discharge it generally with greater honesty than men of the world.” Addison. -- To take up. To stop. [Obs.] “Sinners at last take up and settle in a contempt of religion.” Tillotson. To reform. [Obs.] Locke. -- To take up with. To be contended to receive; to receive without opposition; to put up with; as, “to take up with plain fare”. “In affairs which may have an extensive influence on our future happiness, we should not take up
        with probabilities.” I. Watts. To lodge with; to dwell with. [Obs.] L'Estrange. -- To take with, to please. Bacon.

      4. Take, n.
        1. That which is taken, such as the quantity of fish captured at one haul or catch, or the amouont of money collected during one event; as, “the box-office take”.

        [1913 Webster +PJC]

        2. ( Print. ) The quantity or copy given to a compositor at one time.