Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of to-
Meaning of to- by Wiktionary Dictionary

to-


    Etymology 1

    From Middle English, from Old English tō-, te- ( “apart, away” ), from Proto-Germanic *twiz- ( “apart, in two”, prefix ), from Proto-Indo-European *dis- ( “apart, asunder” ), *dwis- ( “two-ways, in twain” ). Cognate with Dutch toe-, te-, German zu-, zer-, Latin dis- ( “apart” ). More at dis- .

    Preposition

    to-

    1. ( no longer productive, except dialectally ) Prefix meaning "apart", "away", "asunder", "in pieces", or expressing separation, negation, or intensity[1] .
    Derived terms
    Related terms

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English to ( “to” ), from Old English tō ( “to” ). More at to .

    Preposition

    to-

    1. ( rare, dialectal or no longer productive ) Particle ocurring in various words meaning to, toward, at, or on ( this ) .
      today
      tomorrow
      tonight
      together
    Derived terms

    See also

    1. ^ Whitney, The Century dictionary and cyclopedia, to-

    See also

    [+] English words prefixed with to-

    Alternative forms

    • te-, ti-

    Etymology

    From Proto-Germanic *twiz-, from Proto-Indo-European *dwis-. Cognate with Old Frisian ti-, te-, Old Saxon ti-, Old High German zi-, zir-, zar-, zur- ( German zer- ), Gothic ������- ( dis- ), and with Latin dis- .

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /toː/

    Preposition

    tō-

    1. ( as unstressed te-, ti- or stressed tō- ) forming ( mainly ) verbs from verbs, with a sense of ‘in pieces, apart, asunder’, or with intensive force
      tefeallan, tōfeallan ( “to fall apart” )
      titwǣman, tōtwǣman ( “to separate” )
      tetorfian, tōtorfian ( “to toss about” )
    2. ( stressed prefix ) used to form substantives from other nouns
      tōtalu ( “reputation” )
      tōsprǣċ ( “conversation” )

    Usage notes


    T.O.

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/03/26 11:15 UTC Version )

    Abbreviation

    T.O .

    1. ( Canada, informal ) The Canadian city of Toronto. ( Also TO )

    Synonyms

    • Big Smoke
    • Hogtown

    Anagrams

    • OT

    to

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/09/18 17:12 UTC Version )

    Etymology

    From Middle English to ( “to” ), from Old English tō ( “to” ), from Proto-Germanic *tō, *ta ( “to” ), from Proto-Indo-European *de, *do ( “to” ). Cognate with Low German to ( “to” ), Dutch toe ( “to” ), German zu ( “to” ), West Frisian ta ( “to” ). Non-Germanic cognates include Albanian te ( “to, at” ), tu ( “while, for, to” ) .

    Pronunciation

    Stressed

    • ( UK ) IPA: /tuː/, X-SAMPA: /tu:/
    • ( US ) IPA: /tu/, X-SAMPA: /tu/
    • Rhymes: -uː
    • Homophone: too, two

    Unstressed

    Particle

    to

    1. A particle used for marking the following verb as an infinitive .
      I want to leave .
      He asked me what to do .
      I don’t know how to say it .
      I have places to go and people to see .
    2. As above, with the verb implied .
      "Did you visit the museum?" "I wanted to, but it was closed."
      If he hasn't read it yet, he ought to .

    Usage notes

    Derived terms

    Preposition

    to

    1. Indicating destination: In the direction of, and arriving at .
      We are walking to the shop .
    2. Used to indicate purpose .
      He devoted himself to education .
      They drank to his health .
    3. Used to indicate result of action .
      His face was beaten to a pulp .
    4. Used after an adjective to indicate its application .
      similar to ..., relevant to ..., pertinent to ..., I was nice to him, he was cruel to her, I am used to walking .
    5. ( arithmetic ) Used to indicate ratios; in informal use the ratios are not reduced to smallest terms .
      one to one = 1:1
      ten to one = 10:1 .
    6. ( arithmetic ) Used to indicate that the preceding term is to be raised to the power of the following value; indicates exponentiation .
      Three squared or three to the second power is nine .
      Three to the power of two is nine .
      Three to the second is nine .
    7. Used to indicate the indirect object .
      I gave the book to him .
    8. ( time ) Preceding .
      ten to ten = 9:50; We're going to leave at ten to ( the hour ) .
    9. ( Canada, UK, Newfoundland, West Midlands ) at
      Stay where you're to and I'll come find you, b'y .

    See also

    • at

    Adverb

    to ( not comparable )

    1. Common misspelling of too .
    2. Toward a closed, touching or engaging position .
      Please would you push the door to .
    3. ( nautical ) Into the wind .

    Synonyms

    Antonyms

    See also

    • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

    Statistics

    • frequency based on Project Gutenberg corpus">Most common English words before 1923: the · of · and · #4: to · in · I · that

    Anagrams

    • OT

    Etymology

    From Proto-Germanic *tō, *ta ( “to” ), from Proto-Indo-European *de, *do ( “to” ). Cognate with Old Saxon tō ( “to” ), Old High German zuo ( “to” ) .

    Preposition

    1. to, into
    2. at
    3. ( grammar ) used to mark the infinitive ( supine ) of the verb
      tō drīfenne ( “to drive” )

    Adverb

    1. besides
    2. in addition, also, too; moreover

    Descendants

    • English: to, too



Definition of to- by GCIDE Dictionary

to-


  1. To- ( ?, see To, prep. ), [AS. to- asunder; akin to G. zer-, and perhaps to L. dis-, or Gr. ] An obsolete intensive prefix used in the formation of compound verbs; as in to-beat, to-break, to-hew, to-rend, to-tear. See these words in the Vocabulary. See the Note on All to, or All-to, under All, adv.