Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of un-
Meaning of un- by Wiktionary Dictionary

un-


    Etymology 1

    From Middle English un-, from Old English un- ( “un-” ), from Proto-Germanic *un- ( “un-” ), from Proto-Indo-European *n̥- ( “un-, not” ). Cognate with Scots un-, on- ( “un-” ), North Frisian ün- ( “un-” ), Eastern Frisian ûn- ( “un-” ), West Frisian ûn-, on-, Dutch on- ( “un-” ), Low German un- ( “un-” ), German un- ( “un-” ), Danish u- ( “un-” ), Swedish o- ( “un-” ), Norwegian u- ( “un-” ), Icelandic ó- ( “un-” ). Related also to Latin in-, Ancient Greek ἀ- ( modern Greek α- ) and Sanskrit अ- ( a- ) .

    Preposition

    un-

    1. ( added to adjectives or past participles ) not
      unannounced — “not being announced”
      uneducated — “not educated”
      unattractive — “not attractive”
      unconstitutional — “not constitutional”
    2. ( added to nouns ) absent, lacking, not
      unrest ( “a lack of rest ( peace ); war” )
      unhope ( “despair” )
      unfriend ( “enemy” )
      unrepair
      unluck ( “misfortune” )
    Usage notes
    Derived terms
    [+] English words prefixed with un-

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English on-, from Old English ond-, and-. More at and- .

    Preposition

    un-

    1. ( added to verbs and nouns to form verbs ) reverse, opposite
      to undress — “to take one's clothes off”
      to unwind — “to reverse a winding”
      to unlock — “to undo the locking of”
    2. release, free, remove, extract .
      to uncage — “to release from a cage”
      to untangle — “to remove the tangling of”
    Usage notes
    Synonyms

    Etymology 3

    From Latin ūnus .

    Preposition

    un-

    1. Used to form temporary names of elements ( such as ununbium ) whose existence has been predicted, and have not yet been given a systematic name .
    Synonyms
    • -un-

    See also

    • Definition of un- - Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

    Pronunciation

    • IPA: /un/

    Etymology 1

    Proto-Germanic *un-, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥-, a prefix use of the particle *ne ( “not” ). Cognate with Old Saxon un- ( Dutch on- ), Old High German un- ( German un- ), Old Norse ó- ( Swedish o-, Norwegian u ), and Gothic ����- ( un- ). The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek α- ( a- ), αν- ( an- ), Latin in-, and Old Irish in- .

    Preposition

    un-

    1. ( added to nouns and adjectives ) negation, privation, or absence of
    2. bad, used to denote a pejorative sense ( compare mis-, mal- )
      undǣd "un-deed, a bad deed"
      unlǣċe ( “bad physician” )
    3. ( added to verbs ) down
      unsettan ( “to set down, put down” )

    Etymology 2

    Originally identical with and-, from Proto-Germanic *and-. Cognate with Old Frisian und-, Old Saxon ant-, Old High German ant- ( German ent- ) .

    Alternative form

    • on-

    Preposition

    un-

    1. Forming verbs from verbs, with an opposite or reversive sense .

    'un

    By Wiktionary ( 2011/08/13 12:34 UTC Version )

    Pronoun

    'un ( plural: 'uns )

    1. ( colloquial ) one ( a thing ) .
      Give me one of those round 'uns .
    2. ( colloquial, facetious, 主にUK ) one ( a person ) .
      We've got a clever 'un here!

    Derived terms

    Anagrams

    • nu , Nu, NU

    -un-

    By Wiktionary ( 2011/06/06 22:21 UTC Version )

    Etymology

    From Latin ūnus ( “one” )

    接辞

    -un-

    1. ( chemistry ) Used in the systematic names of chemical elements, standing for a 1 in the atomic number

    UN

    By Wiktionary ( 2012/04/13 06:19 UTC Version )

    Initialism

    UN

    1. United Nations

    Related terms

    • UNO

    Anagrams

    • nu , Nu, NU



Definition of un- by GCIDE Dictionary

un-


  1. Un-. [OE. un-, on-, the unaccented form of the accented prefix and- ( cf. Answer ); akin to D. ont-, G. ent-, OHG. int-, Goth. and-. See Anti-.] An inseparable verbal prefix or particle. It is prefixed: To verbs to express the contrary, and not the simple negative, of the action of the verb to which it is prefixed; as in unbend, uncoil, undo, unfold. To nouns to form verbs expressing privation of the thing, quality, or state expressed by the noun, or separation from it; as in unchild, unsex. Sometimes particles and participial adjectives formed with this prefix coincide in form with compounds of the negative prefix un- ( see 2d Un- ); as in undone ( from undo ), meaning unfastened, ruined; and undone ( from 2d un- and done ) meaning not done, not finished. Un- is sometimes used with an intensive force merely; as in unloose.

    ☞ Compounds of this prefix are given in full in their proper order in the Vocabulary.

  2. Un-. [OE. & AS. un-; akin to OFries. un-, D. on-, OS., OHG., & G. un-, Icel. ō-, ū-, Sw. o-, Dan. u-, W. an-, L. in-, Gr. , , Skr. an-, a-. √193. Cf. A- not In- not, No, adv.] An inseparable prefix, or particle, signifying not; in-; non-. In- is prefixed mostly to words of Latin origin, or else to words formed by Latin suffixes; un- is of much wider application, and is attached at will to almost any adjective, or participle used adjectively, or adverb, from which it may be desired to form a corresponding negative adjective or adverb, and is also, but less freely, prefixed to nouns. Un- sometimes has merely an intensive force; as in unmerciless, unremorseless.

    I. Un- is prefixed to adjectives, or to words used adjectively. Specifically: --

    To adjectives, to denote the absence of the quality designated by the adjective; as, --