Dictionary > English Dictionary > Definition, synonym and antonym of Way
Meaning of way by Wiktionary Dictionary

Way


    Proper noun

    ( the ) Way

    1. Christianity ( in translations of texts from the 1st century AD, notably the Acts of the Apostles )
    2. ( Sussex ) the South Downs Way
      We're walking along the Way now .

    Anagrams



Explanation of way by Wordnet Dictionary

Way


    Adverb
    1. to a great degree or by a great distance

    2. way over budget
      way off base
    Noun
    1. how a result is obtained or an end is achieved

    2. the true way to success
    3. a journey or passage

    4. they are on the way
    5. a course of conduct

    6. we went our separate ways
    7. any artifact consisting of a road or path affording passage from one place to another

    8. he said he was looking for the way out
    9. how something is done or how it happens

    10. a lonely way of life
    11. the property of distance in general

    12. it's a long way to Moscow
      he went a long ways
    13. doing as one pleases or chooses

    14. if I had my way
    15. a general category of things

    16. they didn't have much in the way of clothing
    17. a line leading to a place or point

    18. didn't know the way home
    19. a portion of something divided into shares

    20. they split the loot three ways
    21. space for movement

    22. make way for
    23. the condition of things generally

    24. that's the way it is
      I felt the same way


    Definition of way by GCIDE Dictionary

    Way


    1. Way adv. [Aphetic form of away.] Away. [Obs. or Archaic] Chaucer.

      To do way, to take away; to remove. [Obs.] “Do way your hands.” Chaucer. -- To make way with, to make away with. See under Away. [Archaic]

    2. Way, n. [OE. wey, way, AS. weg; akin to OS., D., OHG., & G. weg, Icel. vegr, Sw. väg, Dan. vei, Goth. wigs, L. via, and AS. wegan to move, L. vehere to carry, Skr. vah. √136. Cf. Convex, Inveigh, Vehicle, Vex, Via, Voyage, Wag, Wagon, Wee, Weigh.]

      1. That by, upon, or along, which one passes or processes; opportunity or room to pass; place of passing; passage; road, street, track, or path of any kind; as, “they built a way to the mine”. “To find the way to heaven.” Shak.

      I shall him seek by way and eke by street. Chaucer.

      The way seems difficult, and steep to scale. Milton.

      The season and ways were very improper for his majesty's forces to march so great a distance. Evelyn.

      2. Length of space; distance; interval; as, “a great way; a long way.”

      And whenever the way seemed long,

      Or his heart began to fail. Longfellow.

      3. A moving; passage; procession; journey.

      I prythee, now, lead the way. Shak.

      4. Course or direction of motion or process; tendency of action; advance.

      If that way be your walk, you have not far. Milton.

      And let eternal justice take the way. Dryden.

      5. The means by which anything is reached, or anything is accomplished; scheme; device; plan.

      My best way is to creep under his gaberdine. Shak.

      By noble ways we conquest will prepare. Dryden.

      What impious ways my wishes took! Prior.

      6. Manner; method; mode; fashion; style; as, “the way of expressing one's ideas”.

      7. Regular course; habitual method of life or action; plan of conduct; mode of dealing. “Having lost the way of nobleness.” Sir. P. Sidney.

      Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace. Prov. iii. 17.

      When men lived in a grander way. Longfellow.

      8. Sphere or scope of observation. Jer. Taylor.

      The public ministers that fell in my way. Sir W. Temple.

      9. Determined course; resolved mode of action or conduct; as, “to have one's way”.

      10. ( Naut. ) Progress; as, “a ship has way”. pl. The timbers on which a ship is launched.

      11. pl. ( Mach. ) The longitudinal guides, or guiding surfaces, on the bed of a planer, lathe, or the like, along which a table or carriage moves.

      12. ( Law ) Right of way. See below.

      By the way, in passing; apropos; aside; apart from, though connected with, the main object or subject of discourse. -- By way of, for the purpose of; as being; in character of. -- Covert way. ( Fort. ) See Covered way, under Covered. -- In the family way. See under Family. -- In the way, so as to meet, fall in with, obstruct, hinder, etc. -- In the way with, traveling or going with; meeting or being with; in the presence of. -- Milky way. ( Astron. ) See Galaxy, 1. -- No way, No ways. See Noway, Noways, in the Vocabulary. -- On the way, traveling or going; hence, in process; advancing toward completion; as, “on the way to this country; on the way to success”. -- Out of the way. See under Out. -- Right of way ( Law ), a right of private passage over another's ground. It may arise either by grant or prescription. It may be attached to a house, entry, gate, well, or city lot, as well as to a country farm. Kent. -- To be under way, or To have way ( Naut. ), to be in motion, as when a ship begins to move. --
      To give way. See under Give. -- To go one's way, or To come one's way, to go or come; to depart or come along. Shak. -- To go one's way to proceed in a manner favorable to one; -- of events. -- To come one's way to come into one's possession ( of objects ) or to become available, as an opportunity; as, “good things will come your way”. -- To go the way of all the earth or to go the way of all flesh to die. -- To make one's way, to advance in life by one's personal efforts. -- To make way. See under Make, v. t. -- Ways and means. Methods; resources; facilities. ( Legislation ) Means for raising money; resources for revenue. -- Way leave, permission to cross, or a right of way across, land; also, rent paid for such right. [Eng] -- Way of the cross ( Eccl. ), the course taken in visiting in rotation the stations of the cross. See Station, n., 7 -- Way of the rounds ( Fort. ), a space left for the passage of the rounds between a rampart and the wall of a fortified town. -- Way pane, a pane for cartag
      e in irrigated land. See Pane, n., 4. [Prov. Eng.] -- Way passenger, a passenger taken up, or set down, at some intermediate place between the principal stations on a line of travel. -- Ways of God, his providential government, or his works. -- Way station, an intermediate station between principal stations on a line of travel, especially on a railroad. -- Way train, aWay, n. [OE. wey, way, AS. weg; akin to OS., D., OHG., & G. weg, Icel. vegr, Sw. väg, Dan. vei, Goth. wigs, L. via, and AS. wegan to move, L. vehere to carry, Skr. vah. √136. Cf. Convex, Inveigh, Vehicle, Vex, Via, Voyage, Wag, Wagon, Wee, Weigh.]

      1. That by, upon, or along, which one passes or processes; opportunity or room to pass; place of passing; passage; road, street, track, or path of any kind; as, “they built a way to the mine”. “To find the way to heaven.” Shak.

      I shall him seek by way and eke by street. Chaucer.

      The way seems difficult, and steep to scale. Milton.

      The season and ways were very improper for his majesty's forces to march so great a distance. Evelyn.

    3. Way v. t. To go or travel to; to go in, as a way or path. [Obs.] “In land not wayed.” Wyclif.

    4. Way, v. i. To move; to progress; to go. [R.]

      On a time as they together wayed. Spenser.